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Printed from https://www.writing.com/main/newsletters/action/archives/id/6797-Nailing-that-Dramatic-Essence.html
Drama: January 28, 2015 Issue [#6797]

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Drama


 This week: Nailing that Dramatic Essence
  Edited by: Lonewolf
                             More Newsletters By This Editor  

Table of Contents

1. About this Newsletter
2. A Word from our Sponsor
3. Letter from the Editor
4. Editor's Picks
5. A Word from Writing.Com
6. Ask & Answer
7. Removal instructions

About This Newsletter

There is something powerful about a story that just wraps around you and sucks you in, making you forget your own problems and forces you to care about those of an often fictional character or at least someone to whom you have no personal connection. There’s something powerful about a story that can reduce you to tears. There’s special about a good story that can make you think, reflect, feel, and react emotionally. A good drama is a combination of character and plot development.

Word from our sponsor

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Letter from the editor

When we describe a situation or a person’s behavior as “dramatic,” we usually mean that it is intense, exciting, striking, or vivid. The works of drama that we write share those elements. For example, if you are watching a television show, and feelings of tension and anticipation arise it's because you are wondering what will happen between the characters. Will they shoot each other? Will they finally confess their undying love for one another? When you are reading a drama, you may have similar questions.

Drama is the backbone of any short story, or novel. Even comedies must have some type of drama, or the plot won't move forward. Drama doesn't always mean that people are arguing or physically fighting. Drama simply means that tension or conflict exists. This tension can come in the form of uncomfortable silence, a revelation that adversely affects another character or a lie being told. However, the drama is created, it needs to move the plot along, and shouldn't feel artificial. Don't try to force drama where there is none. Conflict should make the reader want to keep turning the page.

For readers to get emotionally invested in your story, they have to feel for your characters just as they would for real people. Before you can convince your reader that your characters are real, you must get to know them so well that they become real to you. What I suggest is to take the time to create a biography for your character. The bio can be however long as you want it to be. This can be done for all of the main characters and secondary that will have any impact on the story line to help flesh out why they are the way they are. As with anything, do what you feel is right and have fun writing.


Editor's Picks

 All Of Tomorrow She Sings  (18+)
It was a peace she didn't expect
#1239468 by kjo just groovin'

 
STATIC
Rocks for Mama  (ASR)
A little girl's faith saves her mother.
#863665 by Nikola has a Soul

 Watershed  (13+)
A woman in a failing marriage stands at the edge of an affair
#785044 by outlander

 Millions of Reasons  (ASR)
What would a woman do with a million dollars?
#870177 by Vivian

 Invalid Item 
This item number is not valid.
#188382 by Not Available.

 
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Word from Writing.Com

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Ask & Answer


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