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Printed from https://www.Writing.Com/view/1694761
Rated: 13+ · Interview · Experience · #1694761
Fictional interview with "Carly" - an introduction to character and conflict.
Carleton Townsend Brown


fumbling thumps
“...have to use that thing, seriously?”
“I need it, dude. Settle down.”
“So...what, do I have to say like, 'off the record, I'm a Saturday-night whore' now?”
Are you a Saturday-night whore, now?”
“Off the record?”
laughter
“Alright, alright...”
another series of thumps
“Six years with the same characters and you still need a...recordey-thing to interview me.”
“Hang on, I don't even know how to get the damned thing to reco...”
beep.

clatter
“Ha, ack, get off, wait – wait, look! The light's on. Quiddit!”
“Ok, put it down on the table and it should pick up both of us...”
“TESTING, TWO, THREE. SIBILANT. SIBILANT-T-T-T.”
distant; muffled “Carly, for frick-sake, you're gonna eat that thing, I swear it.”
“TESTES, TESTES...SYPHILIS, ONE-TWO.”
laughter; muffled cursing
“I'm seriously gonna stash this thing in your...”
beep.

Begin Official Transcription, CB-Interview, 7.12.2010

ATB:
“Good morning, Drew here - joined by my good friend, Mr. Carleton Townsend Brown – lead character in the “Eternity in an Hour” collection...Carly, say hi to Writing.Com.”

CB:
“Hey-o WDC.”

ATB:
“So Carly, tell me how you feel for starters, heading up the cast of such a...such a, um...”

Carly:
“Endless undertaking?”

ATB: laughing
“Sure, that'll work. How's that going for you?”

CB:
“I should ask you the same question.”

ATB:
“Ooh, snap, dude.”

CB:
“It's interesting, for the most part. I mean, we aren't really done at this point, so I don't know how much to give away about it...”

ATB:
“Nah, man, it's cool. Go crazy; just win me something.”

CB:
“Aight, well. It's work, you know? You've been around for a while, so it isn't like it used to be. Like, suburban National Geographic, twenty-four hours a day.”

ATB:
“And how was that?”

CB:
“At first? It kinda sucked, honestly. You weren't really doing anything, just staring at us and typing crap into your laptop.”

ATB:
“Yeah, it took a while to figure you guys out...”

CB:
“That's what I mean, man. We all felt a little bit like Bigfoot. Pretty unnerving. Especially...you know, in the sack."

ATB:
“How is Richie, by the way?"

CB: laughing
“He's fine, fine. Still at Yale, last time I spoke to him.”

ATB:
“Are you guys still...”

CB:
“What, screwing? Nah, well, not 'til later, right?”

ATB:
“At this point, yeah. I might change that.”

CB:
“For better or...”

ATB:
“I have no idea.”

CB:
“Of course you don't. Didn't I hear you're working on some fairy-book, anyway?”

ATB:
“Elves, Carly. Elves.”

CB:
“Right, right. Gay elves, that's it.”

ATB:
“He isn't gay necessarily, it's just part of the elven...forget it; you know what? Let's talk about that, actually.”

CB:
“Gay elf-sex?”

incoherent grumbling

ATB:
“Jesus wept...”

CB:
“Oh that, well, a couple thousand years ago, an angel came to Mary in the...”

ATB:
“...Carly.”

CB:
“What? We're gay, Drew. I'm gay, you're gay...the whole collection's pretty gay, actually. I mean...right, roll your eyes...but seriously, you're dealing with pretty rich themes. Homosexuality, drugs, parental abuse, suicide...at least we aren't promiscuous, you know? One way or another you're working around a lot of stereotypes that could pigeonhole you long before you publish. I like the idea of saintly sinners; we're all sinners, some of us are just able to accept that and work toward something better despite it. But, all in all, with the characters and conflicts, yeah, I'd have to say it's a pretty gay book...so why the look?”

ATB:
“I'm sorry, it's just that a 'gay book' to me is just a book that still can't get married in North Carolina. What makes the work as a whole 'gay' anyway? Does it start blasting Lady Gaga at every chapter break?”

CB:
“Nah, Streisand.”

ATB:
“Funny girl...”

CB: singing
“People who need people...”

ATB: joining
“...are the luckiest people...”

Both: harmony
“...in the world...”

CB:
“You know, that's really not half-bad. And I'm sorry I called your book gay; I know the whole point is to tell a story to an audience, no matter who they wake up with.”

ATB:
“Thank you. That's funny about the singing, though. You were going to be my singer/songwriter at first.”

CB:
“What happened with that?”

ATB:
“It's a long story, but...well, I gave that bit to Richie to ground him a little. The movie in my head kept bouncing around from p.o.v. to p.o.v. and everyone else had something...you know?”

CB:
“Richie's already good at everything...”

ATB:
“Except being alone...”

CB:
“Ah...”

ATB:
“...and in those shots – scenes, I mean – you're all occupied with something.”

CB:
“Later in the timeline.”

ATB:
“Right. There's this scene that just...ricochets between characters, and I had to fight the urge to have him just staring out the window into the rain.”

CB:
“This is during the Hurricane What's-His-Name bit, right?”

ATB:
“Exactly. So I just threw a guitar at him to see if it stuck. I didn't know if it would, but it did.”

CB:
“I'm glad it did...I can remember him practicing as a kid. For hours. And that '74 Guild D44 that he beat all to hell Senior year.”

ATB:
“Yeah, I still dunno why I put that in there. That's one of my dream guitars...”

CB:
“So we all got different aspects of you as some point, then?”

ATB:
“For the most part, yeah. You got the writing, Richie got the music, Puck got the live theater.”

CB:
“So the writing...was it just that Richie needed the music and theater is Puck's whole premise?”

ATB:
“Um. No, not so much – you would've had the writing regardless. Times of Trial was actually the first scene I ever wrote for this entire 500+ page project, so it only makes sense with you already taking a fiction class in college.”

CB:
“So the first scene you wrote was halfway through the collection?”

ATB:
“Basically. I knew the story long before I was able to start writing. You just always stood out as a character, and I had a bit of a beef with academia at the time...win-win, I guess. I still think it's one of the stronger stories in the entire collection."

CB:
“I'd have to disagree with that. I mean, it's good character but I'd say the strongest writing comes in with David or Joey. Things just get otherworldly; I felt completely insane, and I loved every minute of it."

ATB:
“That's because you're head over heels with both of them, Carly.”

CB:
“I know! Why can't it all be like that?”

ATB:
“I wish it could...I remember saying the same thing to David once. This would be a gorgeous romance, but Eternity in an Hour just isn't a love story. It's about love, yes, but it's also about loss, malice, vengeance, and loneliness."

CB:
“And hindsight...”

ATB:
“Dear God, yes, and hindsight. Do you remember the line in one of your interludes, the one that goes something like, 'For we never really asked, did we, when we needed it most?' ”

CB:
“ 'We left it to those too young to know, or to our elders – those oughta-know-betters that never knew nor asked, themselves.' ”

ATB:
That's as close as I can come to your particular Eternity in an Hour, I'm afraid.”

CB:
“Yeah, I don't think a lot of people really understand that idea...unless...”

ATB:
“Unless they, too, came to that realization at some point. If the premise misses with some, it'll hit that much harder with those like yourself.”

CB:
“That nobody knows, essentially. Being an adult doesn't mean you know best – especially when it comes to growing up gay – and the childhood friends you cling to only know what works for the time being.”

ATB:
“Then throw in love and that ever-present adolescent desperation...nothing makes sense; everything is seen in absolutes. Time is vicious...”

CB:
“ 'Life has never been about time,' Drew...”

ATB:
“Ah, reposte! Clever...I'd forgotten all about that quote.”

CB:
“The book's called Eternity in an Hour and you're forgetting all your Time gimmicks?”

ATB:
Themes, Carly. Pfft, some writer. A motif, if you will...but let's go back a bit, since we're getting deeper into the time aspect. I'd also like my interview back, if it's not too much of a bother.”

CB:
“Aww, but that was good entertainment right there...”

ATB:
“Tell me about your family – your father and mother, especially.”

CB:
“That's more than a bit, but yeah. My father died when I was a toddler, too young to remember him. I think I dream about him sometimes, but I dunno. I look like him in the photographs that my mom still has; she says I'm split between them when it comes to personality, though.”

ATB:
“How so?”

CB:
“I lose control pretty quickly. I don't necessarily see 'red' as they say, but I've been in trouble a couple of times over it...I protect my family, though, and my friends are more than family. My father would never hurt anyone; he grew up in a different world. Etiquette and manners, football and Nixon...”

ATB:
“Wealthy?”

CB:
“A handful of Ivy League libraries wealthy...”

ATB:
“Ah. Philanthropy Fancy wealthy.”

CB:
“Ha, right, exactly. His family collected favors until they soured into a grudge. They ruined people over breakfast and then praised the marmelade. My father was different, though. My mother got pregnant with me and the two of them eloped. There was a lot of strife in those years...a lot of lawyers over some trust my father had set up before he died. I think you call him a financial gardener at some point...a hedge-funder...so he knew his way around a dollar bill. I always figured he'd taken them for as much as he could get before getting married. At least I hope he did; it's not like they'd notice a half-million growing legs here and there. We were definitely ok though, when I was little. It was actually Richie's parents and their firm that put an end to it, finally. They flip Fortune 500 companies between trips to St. Croix, so...yeah, my dad's family collected favors, Richie's collects litigators. There's always an undercurrent of power with them...like a benign hum inside the walls. The Family never caught on to the whole 'undercurrent' ideal...they just used it whenever they could get their hands on it. I feel worst for my mom, 'cause I know there were years when she was up against them alone. But that's most of what I know...she hasn't told me everything yet.”

ATB:
“She will.”

CB:
“Will she?”

ATB:
“Like I said, the story's done. It just isn't written yet.”

CB:
“Will I like it?”

ATB:
“You'll have a lot more respect for your parents, I think. It's not all a tragedy.”

CB:
“Then I guess I'm looking forward to being finished...”

ATB:
“You and me both, Carly. Thanks for stopping by...don't be a stranger, now.”

CB:
“Always a pleasure, except when it ain't.”

ATB:
“ 'No more let Life divide what Death can join together...' ”

CB:
“You just can't go more than ten minutes without quoting Shelley, can y...”

beep.

*Exclaim*1831 words
© Copyright 2010 A.T.B: It'sWhatWeDo (andrew1982 at Writing.Com). All rights reserved.
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