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Printed from https://www.writing.com/main/view_item/item_id/1827896-Controling-malaria-the-Ghana-example
by AMOUNT
Rated: E · Other · Health · #1827896
Article on the dangers of malaria and how best to control its spread, the Ghanaian way
The world malaria report of 2010 states that there were an amazing 225 million cases of malaria and an estimated 781, 000 deaths in the world in 2009 which makes interesting reading.



This is a staggering statistic and most dangerous in the quest to fight the malaria disease which is the number killer of children worldwide with most of the cases being reported in Africa and in other third world countries.



According to the report, most deaths occurred among children living in Africa where a child dies every 45 seconds with the disease according for approximately 20 per cent of all childhood deaths.



This cannot be accepted in this modern era and measures must be taken to control the spread of the disease which if left unchecked, has the potential of wiping out an entire generation.



The challenge to African governments is to put in measures that would ensure that the dangers of malaria are brought under control and that children who are mostly affected, can have an upbringing worthy of note.



In Ghana, government statistics showed that malaria was the leading cause of death in children under age five and that 45 per cent of all outpatient hospital visits were malaria related.



Records showed that among pregnant women, the disease accounted for 14 per cent of outpatient hospital visits, and 11 per cent of admissions and nine per cent deaths.



Controlling the disease is very high on the agenda of the Ghana government with the Ministry of Health spearheading this challenge.



Ghana has made some progress in this direction and the example could be replicated in other countries especially in Africa.



These have included distributing freely, treated mosquito bed nets to pregnant and nursing mothers nationwide and this has gone some distance in minimizing the spread of the disease.



Official campaigns on how to keep clean environments have been ongoing through radio, television, newspaper posters and billboard advertisements all geared towards creating awareness of the disease and controlling its spread.



Insecticides have also been introduced to control malaria with much of the success due to vector control. This is highly dependent on the use of pyrethroids which are the only class of insecticides used on currently recommended Insecticide Treatment Mosquito Nets or Long Lasting Insecticides nets.



Also, Ghana has introduced the new mousticide biolarvarcides which aims at killing the larvae of the mosquito before it matures.



It contains Trypsin Modulating Ooststic Factor expressed in yeast and can be found in two forms called Rice Husks and Wetable Powder which other biolarvarcides don’t have.



This insecticide has been tested in some mosquito prone areas in Ghana and has showed 100 per cent approval by these communities as the mosquitoes were said to have been reduced by 88 per cent.



The product has been accepted worldwide as the most effective and safest moslarvicide in superior long lasting performance.



It is an established fact that the best way of reducing rate of malaria infection caused by mosquito bites was to attack the larvae of the mosquito to prevent their full growth and this is an ongoing practice in Ghana.



The aim is to reduce and eventually eliminate the burden of malaria in Ghana as the disease contributes immensely to poor productivity especially in the area of agriculture where water is extensively used and serves as a breeding haven for mosquitoes.

The eradication of malaria is being tackled communally in Ghana rather that on individual efforts as this principle has a greater effect in doing away with the mosquito which is the main cause of the disease.



This is an example that if adopted in other mosquito prone nations, would go some distance in doing away with one of the most dangerous killer diseases in the world.





The world malaria report of 2010 states that there were an amazing 225 million cases of malaria and an estimated 781, 000 deaths in the world in 2009 which makes interesting reading.



This is a staggering statistic and most dangerous in the quest to fight the malaria disease which is the number killer of children worldwide with most of the cases being reported in Africa and in other third world countries.



According to the report, most deaths occurred among children living in Africa where a child dies every 45 seconds with the disease according for approximately 20 per cent of all childhood deaths.



This cannot be accepted in this modern era and measures must be taken to control the spread of the disease which if left unchecked, has the potential of wiping out an entire generation.



The challenge to African governments is to put in measures that would ensure that the dangers of malaria are brought under control and that children who are mostly affected, can have an upbringing worthy of note.



In Ghana, government statistics showed that malaria was the leading cause of death in children under age five and that 45 per cent of all outpatient hospital visits were malaria related.



Records showed that among pregnant women, the disease accounted for 14 per cent of outpatient hospital visits, and 11 per cent of admissions and nine per cent deaths.



Controlling the disease is very high on the agenda of the Ghana government with the Ministry of Health spearheading this challenge.



Ghana has made some progress in this direction and the example could be replicated in other countries especially in Africa.



These have included distributing freely, treated mosquito bed nets to pregnant and nursing mothers nationwide and this has gone some distance in minimizing the spread of the disease.



Official campaigns on how to keep clean environments have been ongoing through radio, television, newspaper posters and billboard advertisements all geared towards creating awareness of the disease and controlling its spread.



Insecticides have also been introduced to control malaria with much of the success due to vector control. This is highly dependent on the use of pyrethroids which are the only class of insecticides used on currently recommended Insecticide Treatment Mosquito Nets or Long Lasting Insecticides nets.



Also, Ghana has introduced the new mousticide biolarvarcides which aims at killing the larvae of the mosquito before it matures.



It contains Trypsin Modulating Ooststic Factor expressed in yeast and can be found in two forms called Rice Husks and Wetable Powder which other biolarvarcides don’t have.



This insecticide has been tested in some mosquito prone areas in Ghana and has showed 100 per cent approval by these communities as the mosquitoes were said to have been reduced by 88 pre cent.



The product has been accepted worldwide as the most effective and safest moslarvicide in superior long lasting performance.



It is an established fact that the best way of reducing rate of malaria infection caused by mosquito bites was to attack the larvae of the mosquito to prevent their full growth and this is an ongoing practice in Ghana.



The aim is to reduce and eventually eliminate the burden of malaria in Ghana as the disease contributes immensely to poor productivity especially in the area of agriculture where water is extensively used and serves as a breeding haven for mosquitoes.

The eradication of malaria is being tackled communally in Ghana rather that on individual efforts as this principle has a greater effect in doing away with the mosquito which is the main cause of the disease.



This is an example that if adopted in other mosquito prone nations, would go some distance in doing away with one of the most dangerous killer diseases in the world.





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Printed from https://www.writing.com/main/view_item/item_id/1827896-Controling-malaria-the-Ghana-example