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Rated: E · Article · Educational · #1973787
An attempt to improve the ability of teachers to write content for distance delivery.
https://www.amazon.com/Scholastic-Educational-Research-Technology-Mathematics/dp...
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Improving the Ability of Teachers to Write Content for Distance Course Delivery

Problem Statement:
The problem to be solved in this dissertation is that faculty is experiencing difficulty transitioning content from face-to-face to distance course delivery.
 

Goal Statement:
The goal is that faculty will not experience difficulty transitioning content from face-to-face to distance course delivery.


Evidence of the Problem:
Some of the evidence result from forty returned questionnaires administered to forty-five teachers at the project institution in February 20xx indicated that:

•          7 of the 40 teachers used the Internet for teaching purposes.
•          6 out of 40 teachers communicated with the use of Email for teaching purposes.
•          8 out of 40 teachers possessed the necessary word processing skills to enter content accurately, effectively, and efficiently.
•          5 out of 40 teachers had the necessary practice in transitioning content from face-to-face to distance mode.
•          38 out of 40 teachers stated that they would have difficulty selecting the most appropriate medium to deliver the instruction via distance mode.
•          From interviews 4 out of 40 teachers stated that they are comfortable with the forms of assessment tools to use in the distance mode.
•          From records, a survey done by the Joint Board of Teacher Education (JBTE) on Technology Needs Assessment (TNA) and a Front End Analysis (FEA) indicated that 35 of the 40 teachers at the writer's institution would need training in the use of computers to support online course delivery.




Expected Outcomes:

•          At the end of the implementation period, an examination of the courses taught by the 40 teachers will indicate that at least 38 of the 40 teachers used the Internet for teaching purposes as measured by a task checklist (See Appendix A).
•          At the end of the implementation period, an examination of the courses taught by the 40 teachers will indicate that at least 38 of the 40 teachers communicated with the use of Email for teaching purposes as measured by a task checklist (See Appendix B).
•          At the end of the implementation period all 40 teachers will acquire the necessary word processing skills so as to enter content accurately, effectively, and efficiently as measured by a task checklist (See Appendix C).
•          At the end of the implementation period all 40 teachers will get the necessary practice and exposure in the transitioning of content from face-to-face to distance mode.
•          At the end of implementation all 40 teachers will be able to select the most appropriate medium to deliver instruction via distance mode.
•          At the end of the implementation period, at least 38 of the 40 teachers will be comfortable and certain as to the form of assessment tools to use for distance mode as measured by assessment tools checklist (See Appendix D).
•          At the end of the implementation period, all 40 teachers will use the computer to support online course delivery as measured by a competency 10-point scale checklist (See Appendix E).


Causes:

•          Teachers have high anxiety level with the use of technological tools (Senyshyn, Y, 1999).
•          Teachers do not utilize communication technologies to aid in teaching (Simonson, M.R. & Thompson, A. 1997).
•          Teachers are not motivated to use word processing. The college depends too much on hand written document for its record keeping (Motivation, Keller's ARCS Model pp. 260-264. Smith, P.L., & Ragan, T.J. 1999).
•          Teachers are not exposed to writing content for distance delivery (Simonson, M.R. & Thompson, A. 1997).
•          Teachers do not know how to select media for instructional delivery.
•          Teachers are not familiar with the assessment tools for distance education.
•          Teachers do not understand the importance of computer based instruction to support distance instructional delivery.


Solutions:

•          Incorporate technology in teaching.  (Jonassen, D.H., 1996)
•          Incorporate media use in teaching.  (Heinch, Molenda, Russell & Smaldino, 1999).
•          Provide training for teachers in word processing.  (Simonson, M.R. & Thompson, A. 1997).
•          Workshop and training for writing and planning Instructional Events.  (Driscoll, M.P. 2000).
•          Teachers would be exposed to a variety of media during implementation both physical and theoretical media selection. (Hirumi, A. 2000).
•          Provide training for teachers in using assessment tools.  (Simonson, M., Smaldino, S., Albright, M.,& Zvacek, S. 2000).
•          Computer Based Instruction. (Kulik, J.E. & Kulik, C.C. 1987).
Distance Education.  (Byron, I. & Gagliardi, R. 1998).


References

Evidence:

Nordenberg, T. (1999).  Social phobias, traumas, and treatments.  FDA consumer, 33, pp.27-32.

Yang, H.H., Mohamed, D.A. & Beyerbach, B.A. (1999).  An investigation of computer anxiety among vocational-technical teachers, Journal of Industrial Teacher Education, 37, pp.64-81.
 

Causes:

Senyshyn, Y. (1999).  Perspectives on performance and anxiety and their implications for creative teaching, Canadian Journal of Education, 24, pp.30-41.

Simonson, M.R. & Thompson, A. (1997).  Teaching with computers.  An overview of
computer-based learning.  In D.A. Stollenwerk (Ed.), Education computing foundations
(pp.112-113). New Jersey: Prentice-Hall, Inc.

Simonson, M.R. & Thompson, A. (1997).  Managing computers.  Selecting software and hardware. In D.A. Stollenwerk (Ed.), Education computing foundations (pp. 263-266).
New Jersey: Prentice-Hall, Inc.

Smith, P.L. & Ragan, T.J. (1999).  Strategies for attitude change, motivation, and interest.  In P.L. Smith, &T.J. Ragan (Eds.), Instructional design (pp.260-264). New York: John Wiley & Sons, Inc.
 

Solutions:

Byron, I. & Gagliardi, R. (1998).  Communities and the information society: The role of information and communication technologies in education.  [On-line], p8. Available: http://www.idrc.ca/acacia/studies/ir_unes1.htm.

Driscoll, M.P. (2000).  Gagne's theory of instruction.  In P.A. Smith (Ed.), Psychology of learning for instruction (pp.363-372).  Massachusetts: Allyn and Bacon.

Heinch, R., Molenda, M., Russell, J.D. & Smaldino, S.E. (1999).  Instructional media and
technologies for learning.  New Jersey: Prentice-hall, Inc.

Hirumi, A. (2000).  Media selection. In A. Hirumi (Ed.), Enhancing the Dick & Carey model for instructional systems design (pp. 73-93).  Clear lake: University of Houston.

Jonassen, D.H. (1996).  Learning from, learning about, and learning with computing.  In D.A. Stollenwerk (Ed.), Computers in the classroom (p.13).  New Jersey:
Prentice-Hall, Inc.

Kulik, J.E. & Kulik, C.C. (1987, Feb. 26).  Computer-based instruction: What 200 evaluations say. Paper presented at the annual convention of the association for educational communications and technology.  Atlanta, GA.

Simonson, M., Smaldino, S., Albright, M., & Zvacek, S. (2000).  Distance education foundations. New Jersey:  Prentice-Hall, Inc.

Simonson, M.R. & Thompson, A. (1997).  Taeching with computers.  An overview of
computer-based learning.  In D.A. Stollenwerk (Ed.), Education computing foundations (p.112). New Jersey: Prentice-Hall, Inc.
 
 





TASK IN PROGRESS

MODEL

•          Skills to update:
          Training for teachers to acquire and apply skills in utilizing the computer and its application software to write content for online course(s).
 
Purpose:
        To enhance teachers' competence in transitioning content to a software platform (such as blackboard.com).

Structure:
        6 to 10 sessions (2 hr/session) covering learning processes  -  how to use the blackboard course platform and application software (word processing - word 97/2000).


Process:
        Participation in 6 to 10 sessions and completion of required skill practices.
 
Curricula Production Team (CPT):

        Subject matter experts/media specialists/administrators.

Purpose:
        To assist teachers in organizing courseware and select media that is most appropriate to enhance learning.

Structure:
        Consists of subject matter experts (lecturers/teachers), curriculum designers, and media specialists.

Process:
        CPT work together to organize courseware.

NOTE:    subject matter expert(s)  - Education Officer/lecturer/teacher
              media specialist(s)  -  Lecturer in technology/media specialist from  .                                                  Ministry of Education.                                               
              administrator(s)  -  Principal and /or Vice Principal from College.
 
•          Online Completion Compensation (OCC)

Purpose:
        Provide compensation for reorganizing, converting, and writing technology mediated course(s) for distance delivery.

Structure:
        US$150 for successful conversion of course to distance platform.

Process:
        Compensation will be provided upon successful completion and trial run of
technology-motivated course(s).
•          Web site for courses:

Purpose:
        For teachers and students to get necessary information about courses.

Structure:
        A site will be developed for the courses available 'General Course Site'.  This site will serve as a valid information base for teachers and students.

Process:
        Teachers will link respective courses' URL to the Web site for courses.
 
 
•          Calendar:

•          Begins March, 20xx ends April, 20xx
•          Skills update:  March, 20xx to Oct. 20xx
•          Curricular Production Team: Ongoing
•          Online Completion Compensation:Apr., 20xx   
•          Web site for courses: October, 20xx

Note: Appendices are not included.


 
   
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 



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