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My personal recommended places to submit
Cosmos Guide to where to submit

For my writer friends who are just getting started submitting works to literary journals, here are my suggestions and advice based on my four years of submitting to literary magazines and being published in over 150 places so far.
My advice for anyone starting on the submission game is to get the fundamentals down first.

Blog page and author email are essential

Before you submit anything, you need to set up a blog, make a preliminary spreadsheet for tracking, set up an author email., (including an email tracking system) a cover letter template, a folder to store your writing and an offsite backup - I use one drive and an external hard drive and back up every Sunday or before taking a trip.

Tracking System is a must

You need to set up a tracking system. Duotrope can handle it all for you but I double-track it with my spreadsheet. See attached for suggested headers. I use Google docs. There are several others out there but that's enough for now. Please feel free to let me know if you find out other useful sites.

Then put together whatever you want to submit, then look at the various market research sites I have included. and sign up for Duo trope - they will track your submission and send out a weekly market list. And finally, after submitting the update Duo trope and your spreadsheet.

Regarding the spreadsheet, I give each submission a topic so I can track my work. I have found that Microsoft word and One drive search engines are not very good so it is important to be able to track your work by topic.

The headers (columns) I use are

Status (rejected, accepted, withdrawn, re-write, the second submission? Sim okay? Deadline due)
vendor
additional vendors
topic
title
what submitted
format copied from web page submission guidelines
date of entry
date of submission
follow up due - default to three months
response date
response time
Duotrope entry date
update the date as needed
SIM ( note if the simultaneous submission is okay or not, Yes/No )
prior publication (note if prior publication is okay or not and what constitutes "unpublished, Yes/No, default to No if unclear )
re-submission date
prior submission date
title result
(copy from duo trope)
email
URL
address
POS
type of submission
–(email, online, submittable, duotrope. other)
Paid
Cost
source of info location
university affiliation
comments received
notes
additional comments received

I use google docs, Excel had too many bugs in it but any spreadsheet works fine, or access if you know how to use that. Duotrope will track things for you but I prefer to double-track my submissions. And I also post reminders on my daily to-do list as things come in. It is also important to track your submissions and writings in your email and your folders.
I try to save all items by category as I write them as I have found that Microsoft search feature to be not useful nor is One Drive any better.

Oh and one final point - pay attention to whether a site accepts reprints = most don't but they are pretty good at spelling out the rules - follow them!

The bottom line is don't submit until you have completed these preliminary steps.

If you don't have an author web page and an author Facebook page no one will take you seriously. Same thing if you don't have an author email. Once you start submitting you will soon be overwhelmed with emails. All the emails allow you to create more than one account. I use authorjakecosmosaller@gmail.com for my writing and jakecaller@gmail for everything else. The most common email is a simple author or writer followed by the rest of your email handle. The good thing is that if you have more than one account you will get additional storage space. I use one drive for my back-ups but have a G drive account where I store my spreadsheets.

Social Media as well

You also need a Twitter account, a LinkedIn account, and an Instagram account, but not a Pinterest, tumbler, TikTok, or YouTube account, but if you have them, include them.

The good news is if you use word press and install the social media share plug it, your work will be replicated on Twitter, tumbler, and LinkedIn for free, with additional sites available if you purchase the upgrade.

Duotrope A must

Duotrope is a great resource. I subscribed for 50 dollars a year.

You get the weekly market lists and they also keep track of your submissions,

The grinder is good as well and tracks as well.

There are other programs out there, Author Publish, Cathy's prompts, Publishing and Other Forms of Insanity are all good sources of market research as well as Facebook calls for submissions. I copy all these lists to a separate spreadsheet to keep track of them all, then copy them to my main spreadsheet as I get ready to submit.

The most recent duotrope email list follows


[Legend: F=Fiction P=Poetry N=Nonfiction]
Paying publication listings added:

The International Amy MacRae Award for Memoir fee-based (N) TEMP
Museum Piece Anthology [Metaphorosis Publishing] (F)
New Rivers Press Chapbook Contest [New Rivers Press] fee-based (NPF)
Noema Magazine (NF)
Palette Chapbook Prize [Palette Poetry] fee-based (P)
Sublingua Prize for Poetry [Inverted Syntax] fee-based (P)
Superlative Flash Fiction Competition [Superlative: The Short Story Literary Journal] fee-based (F)
Superlative Mini Saga Competition [Superlative: The Short Story Literary Journal] (F)
Superlative Short Story Competition [Superlative: The Short Story Literary Journal] fee-based (F)
Superlative: The Short Story Literary Journal (NF)
Writing Battle fee-based (F) TEMP CLOSED
Non-paying publication listings added:
Daytona Sex (NPF)
Pocket Fiction (PF)
Black Sunflowers Poetry Press (P - fee-based)
Digging Through the Fat: A Journal for Cultural Omnivores (F - fee-based)
Eye to the Telescope (P)
Eyelands Book Awards (FNP - fee-based)
Intrepidus Ink (FN)
Liquid Imagination Ezine (FP)
Poetry Birmingham Literary Journal (P)
Prize Americana for Poetry (P - fee-based)
Riddled with Arrows Ars Poetica Prize (P - fee-based)
Riddled With Arrows Literary Journal (FNP)
Socrates on the Beach (FN)
Solarpunk Magazine (FNP)
Solarpunk Magazine Monthly Micro-Fiction Contest (F)
Tolsun Books (FNP - fee-based)
Wizards in Space Literary Magazine (FNP)
Non-paying publications that have recently opened to submissions:
Broken Glass (FN)
Coin-Operated Press Zines (FNP)
Hayden's Ferry Review (HFR) (FNP - fee-based)
Ice Lolly Review (FNP)
Mason Street: The Literary Magazine of Newark Public Library (FNP)
Pigeon Review (F)
Revue évolution (FNP)
Sad Girl Review (NP)
Untenured Magazine (FNP)
Upcoming Themed Deadlines

(6/24/2022) Hindsight: Black Lives Matter (N)
(6/24/2022) NEW! Sine Theta Magazine: Ember (NPF)
(6/24/2022) Hindsight: Presidential Election 2020 (N)
(6/24/2022) NEW! Coin-Operated Press Zines: Pride is a protest! (NPF)
(6/26/2022) Retreat West Themed Flash Fiction Competition: Margins (F - fee-based)
(6/27/2022) Focus on the Family: Tricky Kids (N)
(6/28/2022) Scottish Book Trust 50-Word Fiction Competition: Write a story featuring sunglasses (F)
(6/30/2022) Kit Sora Flash Fiction Photography Contest: "Burn" photo (F)
(6/30/2022) Hedgehog Poetry Press Pamphlet Competitions: A Slim Volume of One's Own (P - fee-based)
(6/30/2022) Tangled Locks Journal: Abortion (N - fee-based)
(6/30/2022) Azathoth: Ordo ab Chao Anthology: Azathoth (F)
(6/30/2022) redrosethorns Magazine: Connection/Community (NPF)
(6/30/2022) Dangerous Waters: Deadly Women of the Sea Anthology: Dangerous Waters: Deadly Women of the Sea (PF)
(6/30/2022) Flora Fiction Literary Magazine: Desire (PF)
(6/30/2022) Fiery Scribe Review Magazine: Dust (NPF)
(6/30/2022) Capsule Stories: Falling Leaves (NPF)
(6/30/2022) THE POET Anthology Series: Family (P)
(6/30/2022) 3cents Magazine: Growth (NPF)
(6/30/2022) Parhelion Literary Magazine: Halloween (F - fee-based)
(6/30/2022) Strange Aeon Anthology Series: Hopeful Monsters (NPF)
(6/30/2022) Didcot Writers Writing Competition: Just one word (NPF)
(6/30/2022) Lifespan Series: Marriage (NPF)
(6/30/2022) The Quarter(ly): Myths, Fables, and Folklore (NPF)
(6/30/2022) Dark Matter Presents: Monsters Series: NEar Future Monsters (F)
(6/30/2022) Dark Moments: Night of the Killer Flamingos (F)
(6/30/2022) The Vincent Brothers Review: Old Teachers (NF - fee-based)
(6/30/2022) The Gentian Journal: Postcards (P)
(6/30/2022) Isele Magazine: Queer Joy (NPF)
(6/30/2022) Negative Space Anthology Series: Return to Survival Horror (F)
(6/30/2022) Boston Review Annual Poetry Contest: Speculation (P - fee-based)
(6/30/2022) Aura Estrada Short Story Contest: Speculation (F)
(6/30/2022) Best Asian Speculative Fiction Anthology Series: Speculative stories set in an Asian country with Asian main characters (F)
(6/30/2022) Kids Are Hell Anthology: Stories of innocent youngsters turned malevolent (F)
(6/30/2022) The Librarian Anthology: The Librarian (F)
(6/30/2022) Fairy Tale Review: The Rainbow Issue: queer fairy tales written by queer writers (NPF)
(6/30/2022) Funny Pearls: Humour by Women: The World of Statistics (NF)
(6/30/2022) Coffin Bell: The Zodiac (NPF)
(6/30/2022) inScribe: Journal of Creative Writing: Time (NPF)
(6/30/2022) The Spoon Knife Anthology Series: Transitions (NPF)
(6/30/2022) Cast of Wonders: Young Authors (19 or younger) (F)
(7/1/2022) The Twin Bill: All-Star Game (NPF)
(7/1/2022) Through Lines Magazine: Belonging (NPF)
(7/1/2022) Eerie River Publishing Folk Horror Series: Folk Horror (F)
(7/1/2022) Updated! Kaleidoscoped Magazine: Ghosts & Gossip (NPF)
(7/1/2022) Still Point Arts Quarterly: Immersed in Books (NPF)
(7/1/2022) Up the Staircase Quarterly: Odes (NP)
(7/1/2022) English Journal: Our Américas (N)
(7/1/2022) Quagmire Fiction Contest: Quagmire (F)
(7/1/2022) Big Bend Literary Magazine: Rain Dance (NPF)
(7/1/2022) Substantially Unlimited: Stigma (NPF)
(7/1/2022) Still of Winter: An Unsettling Reads Anthology: Still of Winter (PF)
(7/1/2022) THEMA: The Crumpled Yellow Paper (NPF)
(7/1/2022) It Came from the Trailer Park Anthology Series: Trailer Park (F)
(7/1/2022) The ALAN Review: Using YAL as a Disruptor (N)
(7/3/2022) Moss Piglet Zine: Funny Pages (NPF)
(7/3/2022) Luna Press Publishing: Haunted Novel (F)
(7/3/2022) Havok: Pride/Humility (F)
(7/3/2022) Liars' League: Women & Girls (F)
(7/4/2022) Pulp Modern: Horror and Weird Fiction only (F)
(7/4/2022) ACU Prize for Poetry: Hope (P - fee-based)
(7/4/2022) HauntedMTL Anthology Series: Horror with a feminine twist (F)
(7/4/2022) Solarpunk Magazine: Solarpunk at Work subs only (NPF)
(7/5/2022) Focus on the Family: Mother's Day (N)
(7/6/2022) Imitation Fruit Literary Journal: Connection (NPF)
(7/6/2022) Moss Piglet Zine: Mishaps and Misadventures (NPF)
(7/9/2022) Southern Cultures: Black Geographies (N)
(7/10/2022) Whiptail: Journal of the Single-line Poem: Personal Transitions (P)
(7/10/2022) swim meet lit mag: Submerge (NPF)
(7/12/2022) Focus on the Family: Resurrection Day (N)
(7/14/2022) Apparition Lit Flash Fiction Challenge: Coreen Simpson (F)
(7/15/2022) Border Arts Beyond Barriers Anthology: Border Arts Beyond Barriers (NPF)
(7/15/2022) Riptide: Breath (F)
(7/15/2022) NEW! Sad Girl Review: Cat Lady (NP)
(7/15/2022) Waco Cultural Arts Wordfest Anthology: Earth (P)
(7/15/2022) The Amphibian Literary Journal: Family/Ancestors (PF)
(7/15/2022) the winnow magazine: Home and/or Liminal Spaces (NPF)
(7/15/2022) Plum Tree Tavern: Homelessness (P)
(7/15/2022) Youth Speaks: Human Rights in Verse Anthology: Human Rights and Social Justice (NPF)
(7/15/2022) Snapdragon: A Journal of Art & Healing: Innovation (NP)
(7/15/2022) Never Cheat a Witch Anthology: Never Cheat a Witch (F)
(7/15/2022) CHEAP POP: Nostalgia (NF)
(7/15/2022) Writing Magazine Competitions: Shelley Poetry Competition (PF - fee-based)
(7/15/2022) Blink-Ink: Storm (F)
(7/15/2022) Updated! Kosmos Journal Quarterly: The Families We Make (NP)
(7/15/2022) Atticus Review: The Internet (NPF - fee-based)
(7/15/2022) Harbor Anthologies: The intersection of queerness and disability (NP)
(7/15/2022) Sasee Magazine: There is no "I" in "Team (N)
(7/15/2022) Ask Magazine: Unmentionables (N)
( (7/20/2022) NEW! Shima Journal: Coastal waterways, cultural heritage and environmental planning (NN)
(7/20/2022) Burrow e-journal: What does mental health (good or otherwise) look like through the prism of place? (P)
(7/24/2022) Green Ink Poetry: Furrows (P): Speculative Fiction/(F)
(7/31/2022) Hedgehog Poetry Press Pamphlet Competitions: A Baker's Dozen (P - fee-based)
(7/31/2022) Defunkt Magazine: Anatomy (NPF)
(7/31/2022) Amsterdam Quarterly: City and/or Country (NPF)
(7/31/2022) The Cellar Door: A Themed Anthology Series: Dark Highways (F)
(7/31/2022) Eastern Iowa Review: Elven Fiction (F)
(7/31/2022) Fiends in the Furrows Folk Horror Anthology Series: Final Harvest (F)
(7/31/2022) Allegro Poetry Magazine: Freedom (P)
(7/31/2022) NEW! Superlative: The Short Story Literary Journal: Futures (N)
(7/31/2022) NEW! Superlative Short Story Competition: Futures (F - fee-based)
(7/31/2022) NEW! Superlative Flash Fiction Competition: Futures (F - fee-based)
(7/31/2022) NEW! Superlative Mini Saga Competition: Futures (F)
(7/31/2022) NEW! Superlative: The Short Story Literary Journal: Futures (F)
(7/31/2022) ShufPoetry: Graphic Poetry (P)
(7/31/2022) Last Leaves Magazine: Growth (P)
(7/31/2022) FIYAH: Magazine of Black Speculative Fiction: Hauntings and Horrors (NPF)
(7/31/2022) NonBinary Review: In Motion (NPF)
(7/31/2022) Jellyfish Review: Little Sayings (NF)
(7/31/2022) Funny Pearls: Humour by Women: Love at Second Sight (NF)
(7/31/2022) Of Rust and Glass Anthology Series: Midwest LGBTQIA Fiction (PF)
(7/31/2022) NEW! Museum Piece Anthology: Museum (F)
(7/31/2022) The A-Z of Horror Anthology Series: P is for Poltergeist (F)
(7/31/2022) Our Pandemic Anthology: Pandemic (N)
(7/31/2022) Brink Literary Journal: Reverence (NPF)
(7/31/2022) Ring of Fire Anthology: Ring of Fire (F)
(7/31/2022) Lucky Jefferson: Sonder (NPF)
(7/31/2022) Datableed: Sonnets (P)
(7/31/2022) Bloodless: An Anthology of Blood-Free Horror: Stories or poems where no blood is mentioned, nor any associated gore, grue & guts (F)
(7/31/2022) Trembling With Fear: Summer Holiday Special (F)
(7/31/2022) The Walter Swan Poetry Prize: The Audience (P - fee-based)
(7/31/2022) NewMyths.com: The Growers (NPF)
(7/31/2022) Fragmented Voices Big Book Anthology: The Ones Who Make the World Better (P)
(7/31/2022) Bound in Flesh: An Anthology of Trans Body Horror: Trans Body Horror (F)
(7/31/2022) The Ilanot Review: Want (NPF)
(7/31/2022) The MockingOwl Roost: Yugen (NPF)
(8/1/2022) The Avenue: A Mid-Atlantic Literary Journal: Anticipation (NPF)
(8/1/2022) The Place Where Everyone's Name is Fear Anthology: Charity anthology to support women's reproductive health (NPF)
(8/1/2022) Halfway Down the Stairs: Cities (NPF)
(8/1/2022) Last Girls Club: Dark Shadows: The Gay 90s (NPF)
(8/1/2022) Saddlebag Dispatches: Dusty Richards (NP)
(8/1/2022) Embers of Corsari Anthology: Embers of Corsari (F)
(8/1/2022) little somethings press: Ephemera (NPF)
(8/1/2022) The First Line: First line: Lily unlocked the back door of the thrift store using a key that didn't belong to her (PF)
(8/1/2022) Grimoire: Goth Narcissus (NPF)
(8/1/2022) Central Texas Writers Society Anthology: Light and Darkness (NPF)
(8/1/2022) Sydney Hammond Memorial Short Story Writing Competition: Water Under the Bridge (F - fee-based)
(8/2/2022) Focus on the Family: Gifts for Dad (N)
(8/5/2022) Updated! Brute: Raunch, Scares, and Rough Trade Anthology: Gay sexuality, desire, masculinity, and the aesthetics of "rough trade" (F)
________________________________________
Open Submissions on Duosuma
There are 63 projects with 104 open calls for submissions on Duosuma, Duotrope's submission manager.

Open Submissions on Duosuma

There are 63 projects with 104 open calls for submissions on Duosuma, Duotrope's submission manager.

The Alchemy Spoon
The Alchemy Spoon Issue 7
Apple in the Dark
Fall 2022
Best Spiritual Literature Awards (Orison Books)
Best Spiritual Literature Award - Fiction (Charges fees.) / Best Spiritual Literature Award - Nonfiction (Charges fees.) / Best Spiritual Literature Award - Poetry (Charges fees.)
Bright Flash Literary Review
Flash and Short Fiction, Memoir, Rolling Submissions, No Theme
Bristol Noir
Flash Fiction (Charges fees.) / Poetry (Charges fees.)
CafeLit
Ongoing submissions
Children's Books for ages 7–10 (CafeLit)
Children#s 7–10
Children's Picture Books for writer / illustrator teams (CafeLit)
Children's Picture Books
Children's Picture Books for writers (CafeLit)
Children's Picture Books - writers
The Decadent Review
Aesthetics and Abstraction / Criticism and Reviews / Meta on Meta
Degenerate Art
Poetry / Prose - Fiction / Prose - Non-Fiction
Diet Milk Magazine
FALL/WINTER
The Dirty Spoon Radio Hour & Journal
Season 5 - Full Manuscripts / Season 5 - Pitches
Dismantle Magazine
Fall Issue
Dream of Shadows
Website and Anthology
Dream Pop Journal (Dream Pop Press)
Poetry / Reviews / Speculative Diary / Visual Art (Non-Poetry) / Visual Poetry & Erasure
The Echo
Intersections
Ember Chasm Review
Fiction & Nonfiction - Print and Online Issues (Charges fees.) / Poetry - Print and Online Issues (Charges fees.) / Visual Art (Charges fees.)
Embryo Concepts Zine and Collective
Issue #6: Splendor
Emergent Reader Books for Children (CafeLit)
Emergent reader texs and texts upt to 20,000 words for children
Featured Poets (osamasetorbest.com)
Poetry Submission
Feisty Women - Fiction (CafeLit)
Feisty Women Fiction
Feisty Women Non- Fiction (CafeLit)
Feisty Women Non-Ficition
Flash Fiction Collections (CafeLit)
Flash Fiction Collections Open Call
FlowerSong Press
Manuscript Submissions Now Open
Free Radicals Quarterly (Free Radicals Magazine (Quarterly))
Rolling Submissions for Free Radicals Quarterly
Grand Little Things
Poetry
HauntedMTL - Anthology
Women's Charity Anthology
The Headlight Review
Book Reviews
Hidden Villains Anthology Series (Inkd Publishing)
Hidden Villains: Arise
Horror Reviewers Needed! (HauntedMTL)
Horror Reviewers Needed!
KAIROS Literary Magazine
2022 Chapbook Contest (Charges fees.) / 2022 KAIROS Editors' Prizes in Fiction and Poetry (Charges fees.) / CREATIVE NON-FICTION (Charges fees.) / FLASH FICTION (<1000 words) (Charges fees.) / OPINION/EDITORIAL & CRITICAL ESSAYS (Charges fees.) / POETRY (Charges fees.) / SHORT FICTION (>1000 words) (Charges fees.)
Limit Experience Journal (Limit Experience Media)
Sexual Transitions (Charges fees.) / Travel & Sexuality (Charges fees.)
Litbop: Art and Literature in the Groove
Issue 2 Art/Photography/Cartoons / Issue 2 Poetry / Issue 2 Short Story
MacroMicroCosm (Vraeyda Literary)
Hockey Stick Galaxy Volume 8 Issue III / The Siege Perilous: A Philosopher's Throne / Virgo Volume 8 Issue II
Maximus Magazine (Maximus Books)
Issue 2
The Metaworker Literary Magazine
General Call for The Metaworker / Micro Call for The Metaworker
The New York Quarterly
General Poetry Submission (Charges fees.)
The Orison Chapbook Prize (Orison Books)
Chapbook (Charges fees.)
Our Pandemic (The Writer's Workout)
CNF: experiences and tributes
Pen & Publish
Editorial internship / Marketing internship
Please Welcome to the Stage…: A Drag Literary Anthology (House of Lobsters Literary)
Please Welcome to the Stage…
The Plentitudes
The Plentitudes - Call for Poems: Fall 2022 (Charges fees.) / The Plentitudes - Call for Short Stories & Essays (Charges fees.)
Radix Magazine
Radix Magazine Summer 2022 (Charges fees.)
Red Ogre Review
August 2022 - Poetry & Art / Short Genre Fiction Contest (Charges fees.)
The Red Telephone YA books (CafeLit)
YA Novels / YA Novels 45,000 to 105,000 words
River River Books
2022 Manuscript Open Reading Period
A Sad Girls Club Lit
Sad Girls Club $500 Summer Poetry Contest (Charges fees.)
A Sad Girls Club Literary Blog
$300 Short Story, Fiction, & Non-Fiction Contest (Charges fees.)
San Antonio Review
Art
Single author short story collections (CafeLit)
Single author collections
Slant Books
Manuscript Submission (Charges fees.)
Still of Winter: An Unsettling Reads Anthology (Unsettling Reads, LLC)
Still of Winter: An Unsettling Reads Anthology
Still Point Arts Quarterly (Shanti Arts LLC)
1. Immersed in Books - Writing Submission / 2. Immersed in Books - Art Submission / 3. Cities - Writing Submission / 4. Cities - Art Submission / 5. Minimalist Wisdom - Writing Submission / 6. Minimalist Wisdom - Art Submission / 7. Fires and Floods - Writing Submission / 8. Fires and Floods - Art Submission
Sunspot Lit Rigel Contest: $250 for Fiction, NF, Poetry, Art, Graphic Novel (Sunspot Literary Journal)
Rigel 2022 (Charges fees.)
Tales (The Writer's Workout)
Theme: The Deep
Twelve Winters Journal (Twelve Winters Press)
Twelve Winters Journal (Charges fees.)
Volney Road Review
Issue 5 (Charges fees.)
Vraeyda Literary
Poetry Collection / Sci-Fi/Magic Realism/Fantasy Novels
Willows Wept Review
Poetry / Prose / Visual Art
Word Poppy Press
Issue Four / Word Poppy Blog
The Writers Circle Anthology Series (Prime Press)
Campfire Stories / Theme: Purgatory

Author publisher latest list of markets
25 Magazines Accepting Creative Nonfiction

Blue Earth Review

This literary journal is published by Minnesota State University, Mankato. They accept nonfiction of up to 3,000 words, fiction, and poetry. "We are interested in creative nonfiction (memoir and personal essay) with contemporary themes. No literary criticism. …. We love nonfiction that works on more than just a narrative level. Surprise us with metaphor and layers of meaning." Details here.

Mangoprism

They accept both pitches and submissions - for personal essays, cultural criticism, long-form interviews with interesting people, short fiction; album, book, movie and product reviews; original reporting; radical political screeds; and unexpected recipes. Only, "your piece must be at least as enjoyable as eating a morsel of mango, the most succulent of fruits." Pay is at least $0.10 for work of 1,000–3,000 words. Details here.

Channel Magazine

They publish writing from an environmental perspective - "work that engages with the natural world. We have a particular interest in work which encourages reflection on human interaction with plant and animal life, landscape and the self." Essays (up to 6,000 words) and essay pitches are accepted year-round - including creative nonfiction, reportage, commentary, and criticism. They also publish translations. There are submission periods for fiction and poetry, which are closed now. Pay is €50 per page for prose, up to €150. Details here.

(Also see The Willowherb Review, which publishes nature writing, very broadly interpreted, by writers of color; pay is £250 for prose; deadline 30 June 2022. There's also the UEA/Willowherb Speculative Nature Writing Call for Essay Proposals, a mentorship/publishing opportunity, in collaboration with the University of East Anglia, for three new/emerging writers of colour on nature writing; deadline 15 July 2022.)

Reckoning

They want creative writing, including translations, and art about environmental justice. "the nonfiction is more creative than journalistic … the heart of what we want is your searingly personal, visceral, idiosyncratic understanding of the world and the people in it as it has been, as it is, as it will be, as it could be, as a consequence of humanity's relationship with the earth." See the editors' preferences for Issue 7. Send 3–5 poems, and up to 20,000 words of prose. Pay is $0.08/word for prose and $30/page for poetry. The annual deadline is usually Earth Day (22 September 2022). Details here.

New York Times: Modern Love and Tiny Love Stories
These are nonfiction columns. For both, they especially welcome work from historically underrepresented writers, and from those outside the US.
 - Modern Love: They want "honest personal essays about contemporary relationships.

We seek true stories on finding love, losing love and trying to keep love alive. We welcome essays that explore subjects such as adoption, polyamory, technology, race and friendship - anything that could reasonably fit under the heading "Modern Love." Ideally, essays should spring from some central dilemma you have faced. It is helpful, but not essential, for the situation to reflect what is happening in the world now." Also, "Love may be universal, but individual experiences can differ immensely and be informed by factors including race, socio-economic status, gender, disability status, nationality, sexuality, age, religion and culture." Send essays of 1,500–1,700 words.
The Account

They publish creative nonfiction of up to 6,000 words, as well as fiction and poetry. All work has to be accompanied by an account. "An account of a specific work traces its arc - through texts and world - while giving voice to the artist's approach. … We are most interested in how you are tracking the thought, influences, and choices that make up your aesthetic as it pertains to a specific work." At the time of writing, they were reading for their Fall 2022 issue. Details here and here.

So Textual

Their website says, "So Textual is a community and online platform for bookish individuals who seek a smart conversation about literature, creative practice, and a considered lifestyle. We celebrate books alongside the contemporary reader." Among the topics they're always looking for, are personal essays about a single book or author that changed your life. Also see a recent Twitter thread on the kind of pitches they want - "We're always looking for evergreen essays, lists related to reading culture, city guides, and bookstore pilgrimages. We love: overlooked writers, art making, meaning-making, in media res, epistolary, riposte, plot twists, besotted characters, offline considerations, literary props, mythmaking, associate thinking, fragments, synthesis as mastery, the classics, films for the literary". Rates start at $200 for essays and $75 for lists. Details here (Twitter thread) and here (pitching guidelines).

Brick

This Canadian magazine only accepts literary nonfiction submissions, though they also publish some fiction and poetry. "Love has led Brick to publish essays of every description: on reading, the writing life, literature, art, ideas, travel, science, photography, the perfect ending, dance, sport, music, city-building, food, bathrooms, history . . . and we are always looking for new terrain. We are interested in the singular obsessions that compel you to write. We welcome humour, we welcome depth, we welcome the unclassifiable, and we welcome playfulness with the non-fiction form." Their essays are usually 1,000–5,000 words. Their annual reading periods are September 1 to October 31, and from March 1 to April 30. Pay is CAD55–660. Details here.

…ongoing…

They publish writing and music based on prompts; each month, they will publish a prompt (or two); for music, writers have to respond with a prose piece of 50–1,000 words in any genre, and for written prompts, musicians have to respond with a piece of music. They have two musical prompts now, and invite writers to respond to these. The deadline for this month's prompts is 26 June 2022, and pay is CAD30. Details here and here.

Empty House Press

Their website says, "We are looking for writing that addresses the way narrative and presence adhere to place and the way they vanish. We encourage broad interpretations of what the idea or image of an empty house might evoke. This includes but is not limited to writing about home, landscape, place, memory, and of course, the atmosphere of previously inhabited spaces." Apart from nonfiction (up to 2,000 words), they also publish fiction, poetry, and photo series. Details here.
The Iowa Review
This well-regarded literary magazine, associated with the University of Iowa and published for 50-plus years, publishes nonfiction, fiction, poetry, and translations. There's a fee for online submissions for non-subscribers, but postal submissions are free. For prose, length guidelines are up to 25 pages, and pay is $0.08/word. Their annual reading period is 1 September-1
November. Details here.

Good River Review

This journal is associated with Spalding University in Louisville, Kentucky. They publish two issues a year and feature book reviews, craft essays, and other literary news on their website. The magazine "is a home for writing that launches quickly, speaks to the universal through the particular, and is layered with meaning. We also love work that doesn't fit neatly into genre categories. Our editors are attracted to writing that blurs boundaries, and so contributors will find their work published as prose, lyrics, or drama. In addition, we want to publish the most compelling writing for children and young adults that we can find." Prose writers should submit one story, one longer-form essay, memoir, or immersive journalism (up to 5,000 words), or two shorter pieces. Details here.

Riddle Fence

This is a Canadian magazine of arts and culture. They publish contemporary writing, four times a year. They accept creative nonfiction (up to 3,000 words), features and reviews, poetry, fiction, and contemporary art. "For nonfiction, we're looking for essays on the arts or on particular artists, or on aspects of culture and art as an idea or as a specific practice. We are also seeking creative non-fiction with a strong narrative drive." Details here.

Scrawl Place

Their website says, "Scrawl Place is part visitor's guide, part travelogue, part literary journal. It's meant for readers who prefer Bashō to Lonely Planet." Also, "I'm looking for submissions about "places in the places" where you live or where you've visited.

My only fixed criteria is that your submission be about or connected to or associated with a specific, physical place that someone could visit. … The place you write about could be a Wonder of the World, a random street corner that means something to you, or anything in between." They accept creative nonfiction, fiction, poetry, and hybrid works of up to 900 words. Writers can send up to 3 pieces. Pay is $35. Details here.

Empty Mirror

They publish nonfiction - essays, reviews, articles, features, interviews, personal essays, of up to 20,000 words (see guidelines). They also publish poetry and visual art. They publish work every Friday. Details here.

The Sun Magazine

They publish personal essays, fiction, poetry, and photography. "Personal stories that touch on political and cultural issues are welcome." Pay is $300–2,000 for prose, for print. There's also a themed Readers Write section, which publishes only nonfiction - "Feel free to submit your writing under "Name Withheld" if it allows you to be more honest." They have a few upcoming themes for this section, including Anniversaries, due 1 July; and The Phone, due 1 August 2022. Payment for Readers Write is magazine subscription.
Details here and here.

Molecule - A Tiny Lit Mag
They publish prose - fiction and creative nonfiction, poetry, plays, interviews, reviews, and visual art twice annually. All work should be 50 words or fewer (including titles and interview questions). They also want visual art of tiny
things like tea bags and toothpicks, or tiny paintings. Details here.

Dream Pop Journal

They publish work every Tuesday. They welcome submissions in experimental, non-narrative forms. Apart from poetry, reviews, visual art, and visual poetry & erasure, they publish a Speculative Diary, of up to 2,500 words - "Speculative diary is a subgenre of creative non-fiction that incorporates science fiction, fantasy, and horror elements into diary writing. Diary is anything from "Dear Diary" style writing to journaling, to sketches, vignettes, fragments, scintillae, or notes. What makes diary diary for this call is work that is concerned with chronology and kairology. For this specific call, speculative can include any sort of SF/F/Horror mythos, tropes, or archetypes. Speculative will also encompass the paranormal, supernatural, mythic, dystopian, alternate histories, retrofutures, Afrofuturism, dreampunk, Ethno/Southern Gothic, and hi-tech mystery/thriller. The point is to bring genre fiction ideas and aesthetics into one's processing of the real world and memories." Details here.

Points in Case

They want creative, thematic, and entertaining literary humor. They accept many formats, including essays and lists. Pay is $10–35 for submissions up to 1,000 words. Details here.

Pithead Chapel

They want personal, memoir, lyric, flash (short-shorts), hybrid, and experimental essays, of up to 4,000 words. They also accept fiction and prose poetry. Details here.

Autofocus

Autofocus is a literary publisher of artful autobiographical writing. They have a literary journal, a podcast, and now, a press. For the journal, they want "personal essay, memoir, confessional poetry, curated journal/diary, curated letters/e-mail, hybrid explorations of the self, and any writing that makes art from your life." Prose can be a single piece up to 2,000 words, or two shorter flash pieces. Details here.

(The Submittable page also has details of their craft anthology, 'How to Write a Novel.' "I'm looking for essays about brainstorming and drafting and experimenting and workshopping and revising and all the other different stages and elements of writing a novel… even though they probably won't use those words." Pay for the craft anthology essays is $50, and the deadline is 30 June 2022.)

Creative Nonfiction: True stories by (or about) nurses; and more
Creative Nonfiction regularly issues themed submission calls, and normally, these have a submission fee for non-subscribers. However, for their call on true stories by (or about) nurses, they're not charging a fee, nor for pitches on creative nonfiction as a genre. See all the magazine's calls here. For the nurses call, "We're looking especially for pandemic-era stories, which examine the complex and essential role nurses of all kinds have played in providing care and guidance for patients and families, as well as the ways in which the pandemic has affected both individuals and the healthcare system.
We are looking for writers who can write dramatically and vividly about their work. Essays can be from 1,000 to 4,000 words and should be previously unpublished and written in a narrative form, with scenes, description, vivid characters, and a distinctive voice. … All submissions will be considered for the book and might also be considered for other CNF projects." The deadline for this call is 27 June 2022. Details here.

(They're also always open for pitches on writing about creative nonfiction. "We're looking for writing about writing - smart and insightful ideas related to the art, craft, history, or philosophy of creative nonfiction." They're open to these kinds of stories, see guidelines for examples: then & now stories or timelines; explorations of specific subgenres, considering the work of more than one writer; arguments or research or ideas about why/how true stories matter; craft pieces, particularly related to structure, voice, or finding inspiration; pieces that explore connections between creative nonfiction and other fields/forms; in-depth interviews with prominent voices in the field; or, generally, work that engages deeply in some way with creative nonfiction as a form or practice. For upcoming issues, they are specially interested in pitches on voice in creative nonfiction, and flash nonfiction. These pieces are generally 1,000–3,000 words. Details here.)

Night Shift Radio: The Storyteller Series

Night Shift Radio podcast has The Storyteller Series and they choose two stories to publish each month. One story will be chosen for the Full Cast Audiobook treatment; that author will receive $50 for audio rights and non-exclusive print rights. A second piece will be chosen for their mid-month print only piece. The author of that piece will be offered $25. They publish fiction, nonfiction, memoir - anything that reads with tension and excitement. They have short, week-long submission windows during certain months: for 2022, they'll read submissions during 21st to 28th of August, and of November. Please send submissions only during the reading period. Length guidelines are 7,000–10,000 words. Details here (episodes) and here (guidelines).

Pleiades

They are open for regular submissions until 30 June, of nonfiction, reviews, fiction, and poetry. "…we are particularly interested in creative nonfiction that gazes out at the world rather than into the self. This is to say nothing against memoir, only that our publishing aesthetic leans towards the exterior in order to balance what we often see as a focus on memoir and interiority in many literary journals. Essays that perform a weave of the personal with an outward gaze are very welcome. We do not only consider externally-focused creative nonfiction, but this is our taste preference. Limit creative nonfiction submissions to 6,000 words."
And during 1–31 July 2022, they will open submissions for a special folio, 'Silences of War: Erasure within Conflict'. They want nonfiction, poetry, fiction, and hybrid work "that engages with the untold or silenced side of "war" in all its variations - from global to national to domestic conflict. What and who is erased by violence? What sounds do these silences make, and how can they be honored and represented? How can destruction take the form of creation and utterance? Send us your writing about historical and recent conflicts, forms of resistance and persistence, and the silences upheld by oppressive systems, structures, and individuals. We especially welcome creative work from historically marginalized perspectives." Details here.
(There's also Consequence Forum, which accepts work, including narrative nonfiction, on the consequences of war and geopolitical violence. Pay is $20–200, and the submission period is 15 July-15 October 2022.)
5 Paying Literary Magazines to Submit to in June 2022
These magazines accept fiction, nonfiction, and poetry. They're a mix of literary and genre markets, and not all of them are open through the month.
Extra Teeth

This is a Scottish magazine with an international outlook; they publish fiction and nonfiction. "We look for short stories that stick with you, lingering in the memory long after reading, and essays that explore specific interests or issues from a new perspective. We offer a space for writers to be strange, bold and experimental, and to express their unique style however they see fit." They also commission one guest illustrator per issue, whom they pay £500.
Deadline: 14 June 2022
Length: 800–4,000 words
Pay: £100
Details here.
(And Mud Season Review is open for fiction, nonfiction, and poetry. Pay is $50, and the deadline is 30 June 2022, or until filled, for fee-free submissions.)
The Puritan

This Canadian literary magazine publishes fiction, nonfiction, interviews, reviews, and poetry. They accept a limited number of fee-free submissions every month.
Deadline: 25 June 2022 for Summer issue; reads year-round
Length: Up to 10,000 words for fiction, up to 4 poems; various for nonfiction (see guidelines)
Pay: CAD200 per essay; CAD150 for fiction; CAD100 per interview or review; CAD25 per poem (or page, capped at CAD80)
Details here.
Mythic

This is a quarterly speculative fiction magazine seeking diverse sci-fi and fantasy fiction. They also accept reprints. They read during March, June, September, and December.
Deadline: 30 June 2022
Length: 2,000–5,000 words
Pay: $0.01/word
Details here.
(And Fusion Fragment will open a very short submission window in June. They want "Science fiction or SF-tinged literary fiction stories and novelettes ranging anywhere from 2,000 to 15,000 words. Although any science fiction subgenre is fair game, our tastes lean towards slipstream, cyberpunk, post-apocalypse, and anything with a little taste of the bizarre." Pay is CAD3.5c/word, up to CAD300. Reading period is 10th to 12th June 2022. Details here.)
Palette Poetry

They publish poems from writers at all stages of their careers, and especially encourage emerging poets to submit. Send up to 5 poems. (They're also running a fee-based contest for women poets.)
Deadline: Ongoing
Length: Up to 5 poems
Pay: $50/poem, up to $150
Details here. (scroll down)
Grub Street: Now Accepting Manuscript Queries
An award winning niche publisher. No agent required.
Keep Reading…
More…

The Dread Machine: Now Seeking Submissions
Now seeking short stories. They pay all their authors.
Keep Reading…
The Writing Project That Took a Quarter of a Century to Complete
Just after giving up - this author got an email that changed her life. Here's what happened.
Keep Reading…
Announcing The 2022 Poetry Marathon! Write 24 poems in 24 hours with hundreds of writers from around the world. Learn more here.
Cathy's Comp's also provides a great list of markets
Here they are:
https://compsandcalls.com/wp/2022/06/01/comps-and-calls-for-june-2022/
Cathy x
Erica Dreifus also publishes a good market summary at the Praticing Writer website.
https://email.mg-d1.substack.com/c/eJxVkd1uhCAQhZ9G7tbwo4gXXDRp9jUIwujSVTD8tPHti...

The Practicing Writer 2.0: June 2022
55+ carefully curated calls and competitions for poets, fictionists, & writers of cnf. No fees. Paying opportunities only. Nothing that's limited to residents of a single city/state/province.

Erika Dreifus
May 31


Welcome, new readers, and welcome back to the regulars!

For updates and additional opportunities between newsletters, please check the "Practicing Writing" blog and follow Erika Dreifus on Twitter (@ErikaDreifus) and/or Facebook.

If you are accessing this newsletter via email, you may find a "Message Clipped" warning as you continue reading. That's due to the length of this info-packed missive. Please be sure to click as appropriate to view the complete text.
Please share this newsletter with your networks! If you'd like to share individual listings with others, PLEASE CREDIT THE PRACTICING WRITER (ideally with a link - a working one, I somehow find it necessary to add) back to this newsletter.
Thanks for respecting your editor's volunteer efforts.

IN THIS ISSUE:
1. Editor's Note
2. Success Stories
3. Featured Resource
4. Current Contests, Competitions, and Other Opportunities (NO ENTRY OR APPLICATION FEES; PAYING OPPORTUNITIES ONLY; NOTHING THAT'S LIMITED TO WRITERS IN A SINGLE CITY/STATE/PROVINCE)
5. Submission Alerts (NO SUBMISSION/READING FEES; PAYING CALLS ONLY; NOTHING THAT'S LIMITED TO WRITERS IN A SINGLE CITY/STATE/PROVINCE)
6. Blog Notes
7. Newsletter Matters

1. EDITOR'S NOTE
Welcome, practicing writers:
I wish that May had been a better month.
I wish that we lived in a better, less-wounded world.
I wish that I had healing words to offer here. I don't.
But we are writers. And we work with words.
And if and when you have words to share that relate to recent events, perhaps some of the information in this newsletter will help you share and amplify them.
With hopes for better times,
ERIKA

2. SUCCESS STORIES
From Marsheila (Marcy) Rockwell:
#Writers, you should totally check out @erikadreifus's The Practicing Writer. I've sold at least 3 pieces to markets that probably wouldn't have been on my radar if not for her newsletter. [ED note: Click through for links!]
From Anca Szilágyi:
Thanks to your posting The Fiddlehead's calls for submissions in your newsletter, last year I sent them my essay "Boiled Boot," about my grandmother's childhood starvation during the Shoah and integenerational trauma, and it is now in their spring issue. Since it's in print only, I put a bit about the essay on my blog too. I so appreciate all that you do for the literary community!
From Allison Floyd:
I just had a (paid!) blog post accepted for "The Growlery," Run Amok Books' new blog about writers and writing. I became aware of this opportunity via the May edition of The Practicing Writer. It probably wouldn't have ended up on my radar without your fantastic newsletter. Thank you!
Please share news from your writing practice that may be connected with this newsletter or our other resources. I love to celebrate such successes in this space!

3. FEATURED RESOURCE
In preparation for a couple of recent presentations, I've updated a list titled "Where to Read (And Publish) Writing on Jewish Themes": bit.ly/JewishWriting

As noted in introductory text, this resource is not limited to no-fee/paying publications, so bear that fact in mind.

4. CURRENT CONTESTS, COMPETITIONS, AND OTHER OPPORTUNITIES
• RUTH LILLY AND DOROTHY SARGENT ROSENBERG FELLOWSHIPS
Deadline June 2 (11:59pm Chicago time). Awards $25,800 each "to five young poets through a national competition sponsored by the Poetry Foundation. Established in 1989 by the Indianapolis philanthropist Ruth Lilly and increased in 2013 with a gift from the Dorothy Sargent Rosenberg Memorial Fund, the fellowships are intended to encourage the further study and writing of poetry." Note that applicants "must reside in the U.S. or be U.S. citizens" and "must be at least 21 years of age and no older than 31 years of age as of April 30, 2022."
• LETRAS BORICUAS FELLOWSHIP
Deadline: June 13 (4pm Eastern). Sponsored by The Mellon Foundation and The Flamboyan Foundation's Arts Fund, this program provides 40 writers (20 selected in 2021 and 20 to be selected in 2022) with $25,000 each. "Recipients will also participate in a gathering of all forty Fellows to be hosted in Puerto Rico, tentatively scheduled for April 2023. While fellowship award funds are unrestricted, the hope is to help writers in Puerto Rico and across the diaspora, pursue their writing, amplify their work to a broader audience, and create work that celebrates Puerto Rican life and culture. It is also the aim that each Fellowship cohort will include writers of different genres [poetry, fiction, creative nonfiction, and children's literature] and writers who live in Puerto Rico, as well Puerto Ricans who may live in the United States. Applications will be accepted in Spanish and/or English."
• ANONYMOUS WAS A WOMAN ENVIRONMENTAL ART GRANTS
Deadline: June 14 (5pm Eastern). "This program provides up to $20,000 for projects led by women-identifying artists in the United States and U.S. Territories," supporting "environmental art projects that inspire thought, action, and ethical engagement. Projects should not only point at problems, but aim to engage an environmental issue at some scale." Note that "selected projects must benefit the public in some way, and are required to have a public engagement component by June 30, 2023."
• BARD FICTION PRIZE
Deadline: June 15 (received). For "a promising emerging writer who is an American citizen aged 39 years or younger at the time of application. In addition to a $30,000 cash award, the winner receives an appointment as writer in residence at Bard College for one semester, without the expectation that he or she teach traditional courses. The recipient gives at least one public lecture and meets informally with students." Application must include "three copies of the published book they feel best represents their work."
• JANE BRINKLEY SUMMER FELLOWSHIP
Deadline: June 15. "The Poetry Society of New York is seeking a generous, creative, thoughtful, open-minded, and hardworking young artist for our 2022 Jane Brinkley Fellowship. This fellowship is named after and was founded in memory of our former intern who we tragically lost at the beginning of this year….With this fellowship, we want to grant the opportunity for a college student like Jane to move to New York City for the summer and help produce the New York City Poetry Festival from September 10th-11th….This fellowship will last from July 1st to September 15th. The awardee will receive $5000 for these three months, as well as support from the Poetry Society of New York re: finding housing and acclimating to the New York area."
• CHRISTOPHER HEWITT AWARD
Deadline: June 15. Honoring A&U Magazine's first literary editor, "the award showcases outstanding responses to the AIDS pandemic and the realities of individuals living with or affected by HIV/AIDS in the genres of fiction, poetry, drama, and creative nonfiction." Awards $75 (per category) and publication. Judges: Philip F. Clark (poetry), Raymond Luczak (fiction), Jay Vithalani (creative nonfiction), Bruce Ward (drama).

• #HIPPOCAMP22 CONFERENCE SCHOLARSHIPS
Deadline: June 15. "Hippocampus Magazine is pleased to announce that it's offering an increased number of scholarships to HippoCamp: A Conference for Creative Nonfiction Writers this year, including three donor-supported (two of which are new this year). HippoCamp 2022 is an in-person conference, scheduled for Aug. 12–14 in Lancaster, PA. All conference scholarships cover full registration and entrance into a pre-conference workshop; the Friends and WOC scholarships also include a $200 travel stipend." Funding opportunities include scholarships open to all writers; scholarships open to all and to unpublished writers of color; a scholarship open to all neurodiverse writers; and a scholarship open to all writers of flash creative nonfiction.

• NORTON WRITER'S PRIZE
Deadline: June 15. "Recognizes outstanding original nonfiction by undergraduates. The contest is open to students age 17 and above who are enrolled in an accredited 2- or 4-year college or university during the 2021–2022 academic year. Three cash prizes of $1,000 apiece will be awarded in 2022 for coursework submitted during the academic year," one in each category (first-year student in a 2- or 4-year college or university; student in a 2-year college/university; student in a 4-year college/university). Instructor nomination required.

• EUGENE C. PULLIAM FELLOWSHIP FOR EDITORIAL WRITING
Deadline: June 20. "Awards $75,000 to an outstanding editorial writer or columnist to help broaden his or her journalistic horizons and knowledge of the world. The annual award can be used to cover the cost of study, research and/or travel in any field. The fellowship results in editorials and other writings, including books."

• MOLLY KEANE CREATIVE WRITING AWARD
Deadline: June 22 (noon, Irish time). Competition "for people resident on the island of Ireland" for an unpublished short story. Prize: "€250 cash plus a course of the winners choice in the Molly Keane Writers Retreat, Ardmore in 2023 to the value of €250." NB: "It is highly advisable that entries are not currently submitted elsewhere for consideration."

• DAVE GREBER FREELANCE WRITER AWARDS
Deadline: June 24. Two awards for social justice writing: "The book award is set at $5,000 and the magazine award is set at $2,000. Since the awards can be given before publication and book and magazine publishing timelines can differ, so do the requirements for each award." Limited to writers who are "a continuing resident of Canada and at the date of application lived in Canada for the last twelve months" and "working a minimum of seventy per cent of their work time as a self-employed freelance writer."

• GREAT LAKES COLLEGE ASSOCIATION NEW WRITERS AWARD
Deadline: June 25. "For the 53rd year this group of thirteen independent Midwestern colleges will confer recognition on a volume of writing in each of three literary genres: poetry, fiction, and creative non-fiction. Publishers submit works on behalf of their authors; a defining criterion for this award is that a work must be an author's first–published volume in the genre." The winning writers "receive invitations to visit several GLCA member colleges, where they will read from their works and engage with students and faculty members in a variety of contexts." Authors "receive an honorarium of $500 from each of the colleges they visit. In addition, writers are reimbursed for all travel, lodging, and food costs they might incur in visits to GLCA member colleges." Limited to writers resident in the U.S. and Canada; publishers may submit only one entry per category. This year's competition will consider works "that bear a publication imprint of 2021 or 2022."

• BLUE MOUNTAIN ARTS POETRY CONTEST
Deadline: June 30. Biannual contest awards cash prizes ($350/$200/$100). "In addition, the winning poems will be displayed on our website." Tips: "Poems can be rhyming or non-rhyming, although we find that non-rhyming poetry reads better. We suggest that you write about real emotions and feelings and that you have some special person or occasion in mind as you write."

• ZACHARY DOSS FRIENDS IN LETTERS MEMORIAL FELLOWSHIP
Deadline: June 30. Posted by Ryan Bollenbach/Heavy Feather Review: "In thinking about my relationship with my late friend and fellow writer Zach Doss, I often feel nostalgic about my lunches with him (and our subsequent conversations on the walk home); we would talk about writing, publishing, submissions (when we worked together at Black Warrior Review), campy TV series we were watching at the time, gossip about our MFA, or life in general. It was a significant aspect of our friendship. Though we rarely critiqued each other's work in class, these meals and conversations were important to our relationship as friends and writers. It is with this kind of friendship in mind that I (along with the generous donation of an anonymous donor) am offering a small sum of $50 to four pairs of friend-artists who submit portfolios of work (with a short introduction) intended to be used for the winners to get a meal together, see a movie, get a few drinks together at a conference, etc. The key is being together. In this way, the offering is low stakes - with no expectation of production - yet I also hope to encourage writers to look beyond ideas of individual work and success that most competitions encourage and toward a deliberate investment in their relationship with their creative partner."

• DRUE HEINZ LITERATURE PRIZE
Deadline: June 30. "Eligible submissions include an unpublished manuscript of short stories; two or more novellas (a novella may comprise a maximum of 130 double-spaced typed pages); or a combination of one or more novellas and short stories. Novellas are only accepted as part of a larger collection. Manuscripts may be no fewer than 150 and no more than 300 pages." Open to those writing in English "who have published a book-length collection of fiction or at least three short stories or novellas in magazines or journals of national distribution. Digital-only publication and self-publication do not count toward this requirement." Confers $15,000, publication by the University of Pittsburgh Press, and promotional support.

• BROOKLYN CARIBBEAN LITERARY FESTIVAL (BCLF) SHORT FICTION STORY CONTEST
Deadline: July 1. The 2022 contest "will award US$1750 in cash for each of the two prizes [the BCLF Elizabeth Nunez Caribbean-American Writer's Prize and the BCLF Elizabeth Nunez Award for Writers in the Caribbean] for the best piece of unpublished short fiction." Judges: Katia D. Ulysse and Ifeona Fulani for the Caribbean-American Writer's Prize and Ayesha Gibson-Gill and Tanya Savage-Batson for the Award for Writers in the Caribbean.

• RICHARD MARGOLIS AWARD
Deadline: "Applications are accepted year-round but must be received by July 1 for consideration for the current-year award." For "a promising new journalist or essayist whose nonfiction work combines warmth, humor and wisdom and sheds light on issues of social justice. The award honors the life of Richard J. Margolis (1929–1991), a renowned journalist, essayist and poet who gave eloquent voice to the rural poor, migrant farmworkers, Native Americans, aging adults and others whose voices are seldom heard. He also wrote several books for children." Award combines a one-month residency at Blue Mountain Center and a $10,000 prize.

• MARLBOROUGH LIT FEST LOVE BOOKS COMPETITION
Deadline: July 1. "We want you to tell us why you love your favourite book, poem or play. Your response can be in the form of a piece of text of up to 750 words, or through a video of no more than four minutes. Entrants should explain what they love about their chosen read, highlighting key areas of interest, and why they think others should try it. We are looking for creative, passionate, and engaging responses which celebrate your love of reading." Prizes (£300 for a winner and £100 for a runner-up) will be awarded in each of three age-group categories: "13–16 years, 17–19 years, 20+ years." Open to entrants outside the UK, "but you need a UK bank account to receive your prize money if you win." (Hat tip: Sian Meades-Williams's Freelance Writing Jobs newsletter.)

• KINGSLEY AND KATE TUFTS POETRY AWARDS
Deadline: July 1. Based at Claremont Graduate University and given for poetry volumes published in the preceding year, these prizes confer $100,000 (Kingsley Tufts Poetry Award) and $10,000 (Kate Tufts Discovery Award). The current cycle will recognize works published between July 1, 2021, and June 30, 2022; the Kingsley Tufts award is for a mid-career poet while the Kate Tufts Discovery Award is for "a first book"; the Kingsley Tufts award also requires the winner to spend, within six months of the award presentation, "one week in residence at Claremont Graduate University for lectures, workshops, and poetry readings in Claremont and Greater Los Angeles." NB: Self-published books are eligible. Note also: "Work must be original poetry written originally in English by a poet who is a citizen or legal resident alien of the United States."

• POETRY COALITION FELLOWSHIPS
Deadline: July 3. "The Poetry Coalition, a network of 25+ poetry organizations coordinated by the Academy of American Poets, is pleased to announce the 2022–2023 Poetry Coalition Fellowships, which are paid fellowship positions for five individuals who will each assist a different Poetry Coalition organization for twenty hours per week over the course of a forty-week period. The fellows will also receive professional development opportunities. The five organizations hosting Poetry Coalition Fellows this year are Letras Latinas, Mass Poetry, Urban Word, Woodland Pattern, and Youth Speaks….The positions will begin on September 5, 2022 and end on June 30, 2023. Interested individuals that are 21 or older are encouraged to apply, including those who are enrolled in or have recently graduated from an MFA program in creative writing."
REMINDER: Some opportunities listed in last month's newsletter remain open.

5. SUBMISSION ALERTS

• From quarterly zine STANCHION: "Three separate submission windows for Issue 8 will open in early June." No theme. Pays: "$10, one complimentary copy of that issue of Stanchion, and a discount code to order extra copies." Windows: June 1–3 for poetry; June 5–7 for "non-poetry": June 9–11 for visual art.
• Opening June 1 (and remaining open for the rest of the month): BATH MAGG, "a magazine of new poetry," for its summer issue. No simultaneous submissions. Payment: £20.

• "CUTLEAF will be opening to fiction submissions on June 1. We're limiting the call to 100 submissions for this reading period, so if you have a piece yo''d like to submit, get it ready!" From the guidelines: "Cutleaf is interested in fiction of all shapes and sizes, although we are generally interested in work less than 6,000 words. Longer work must be exceptionally compelling, and we may publish longer works in installments. Short excerpts from longer works are more likely to be accepted when they stand alone as a discrete work. We will read one long piece or up to three short pieces at a time per author. We are also interested in flash fiction with a limit of 1,000 words. Cutleaf will pay from $100 to $400 for published fiction."

• THE MCNEESE REVIEW will open June 1 (and will remain so until August 31) "for submissions of poetry, fiction, and nonfiction for our 2023 print issue." Payment: "All print contributors receive one contributor copy. We are pleased to also offer a $50 honorarium to print contributors within the U.S. Contributors outside of the U.S. will receive two additional author copies in lieu of the honorarium."
• Vermont-based international journal MUD SEASON REVIEW will be open during the month of June, though "we may close the reading period early by genre if volume demands." They're seeking "deeply human work that will teach us something about life, but also about the craft of writing or visual art, and work that is original in its approach and that in some way moves us." Payment: "$50 for work that appears in our issues. For artists whose images are paired with writing, and for poets whose work appears in The Take: Mud Season Review, we offer payment of $15." (Hat tip here goes to the markets newsletter from WOW! Women on Writing.)

• TACO BELL QUARTERLY has announced: "TBQ6 will be open June 1st to September 5th for a winter issue. Will pay $100."
• Also opening June 1, Ontario-based THE /TEMZ/ REVIEW. They pay $20 (presumably CAD) for poetry and prose.
• I've been alerted that in honor of Juneteenth, THE MAINE REVIEW will run a fee-free submissions window from June 13 to June 19. (Another no-fee window, honoring Pride Month, will run from June 27 to July 3.) They publish "contemporary fiction, nonfiction, and poetry, including works in translation and hybrid forms." Pay rates: "Fiction and Nonfiction writers receive a $25 honorarium per published flash (1,000 words or fewer) and a $50 honorarium for work 1,001 words or more. Poets receive a $25 honorarium per published poem."

• Until June 15, BELL PRESS welcomes submissions for several projects, including two anthologies (one on "Rituals" and the other on "Framework of the Human Body"), paying royalties and "an advance of $15 Canadian prior to publication." They're also receiving submissions for a 2023 Poetry Day Planner, for which payment is "a flat amount of $15 Canadian."

• CHANNEL, an Ireland-based litmag "born out of the climate crisis, publishing poetry and prose with an environmentalist perspective," will close for submissions of fiction and poetry on June 15. (According to their guidelines, "essay submissions, which will be considered for online publication as well as for our next print issue, are open year-round.") Payment: "€50 per poem and €50 per page of prose up to a total maximum fee of €150. Contributors will also receive a copy of whichever issue their work appears within."

• Another one closing June 15: GRAIN, "an internationally acclaimed literary journal that publishes engaging, surprising, eclectic, and challenging writing and art by Canadian and international writers and artists." Send poetry, fiction, or literary nonfiction (query for other genres). Pays: "All contributors, regardless of genre, are paid $50 per page to a maximum of $250, plus two copies of the issue in which their work appears" (the payment is presumably in Canadian dollars). NB: They do have a Submittable cap.

• Also closing June 15: KALEIDOSCOPED, "a new literary magazine formed by MFA students at UC San Diego," which is currently seeking submissions on the theme of "Ghosts and Gossip." Pays: $20. (Hat tip: @Duotrope.)
• FOYER, a UK-based "independent magazine celebrating and exploring untold stories from people of mixed, third culture and second-generation cultural heritage," welcomes pitches and submissions for its first issue, on the theme of "Connect," until June 17. Pays: £75.

• THE PURITAN seeks submissions "all year round, from anywhere in the world," but work received by June 25 will be considered for the summer issue. NB: "Please note that we can only issue payments using PayPal or a cheque in the mail. We also pay in CAD." Pay rates range from $25-$200. "Please note that we can only issue payments using PayPal, Canadian bank e-transfer, or a cheque in the mail. We also pay in CAD. We can pay using Western Union [except to Nigeria] if no other option is available."

• Until June 27, CREATIVE NONFICTION/IN FACT BOOKS seeks "essays by and about nurses for an expanded anniversary edition of I Wasn't Strong Like This When I Started Out: True Stories of Becoming a Nurse. "We're looking especially for pandemic-era stories, which examine the complex and essential role nurses of all kinds have played in providing care and guidance for patients and families, as well as the ways in which the pandemic has affected both individuals and the healthcare system." Payment is unspecified, but "this is a paying market. All submissions will be considered for the book and might also be considered for other CNF projects."

• Attention, Canadians! CLOUD LAKE LITERARY seeks submissions. "We currently publish fiction, creative nonfiction, poetry, and children's literature (ages up to and including YA)." Receives submissions year-round, but work received by June 30 will be considered for the fall issue. Payment: $50 CAD per page to a maximum of $150 CAD.

• The Rainbow Issue of FAIRY TALE REVIEW "will be dedicated to queer fairy tales written by queer writers" and will remain open for submissions until June 30. "While The Rainbow Issue will be dedicated to queer fairy-tale poetry and prose written by writers who self-identify as members of the LGBTQIA+ community, we are especially interested in submissions by writers working at the intersection of queerness, including women and nonbinary writers, BIPOC, writers with disabilities, and writers from other marginalized and underrepresented groups in mainstream publishing." Pays: "Contributors will receive two (2) issues of The Rainbow Issue and a $50 honorarium upon publication."

• FREEZE FRAME FICTION also remains open for submissions until June 30. Submissions should be "1000 words or less, any genre, no content restrictions. We want your science fiction, fantasy, horror, mystery, drama, literary works, satire, bizarre fiction, or anything else you can come up with or mix together. The more original, the better. The weirder, the better." Pays: "$10 per accepted piece."

• June 30 is the deadline for pamphlet submissions at NEON BOOKS: "Neon Books publishes a selection of paper broadsides and pamphlets, which are sent out for free with print orders….We're looking for short works, such as individual poems, small sets of very short poems, or short pieces of fiction. Hybrid works, comics and illustrated pieces are also very welcome….We really enjoy pieces that can be presented in an interesting or unusual way. If you can think of an interesting way of presenting your work, please do include a note describing this in your cover letter. There's no need to format your work ready for printing." Will consider reprints. Payment: "a one-off fee of £25 on acceptance."

• June 30 is also the deadline for submissions for NEW GOTHIC REVIEW, which seeks "previously unpublished short stories that reimagine Gothic fiction for the 21st century." Pays: "a flat $65 for stories (paid within 30 days of acceptance)."
• THREADCOUNT, too, remains open until June 30. This publication "accepts original and previously unpublished works of prose, poetry, fiction, nonfiction, and hybrid text, but we prefer writing that resists such classifications. Primarily we focus on hybrid works between prose poetry and flash fiction." Pays: $25. (Thanks to FlashFictionFlash for introducing me to this one.)

• THE WILLOWHERB REVIEW, which "aims to provide a digital platform to celebrate and bolster nature writing by emerging and established writers of colour," is open for submissions until June 30 ("23.59[BST]"). "We're looking for previously unpublished prose - non-fiction especially, but we will consider fiction and poetry - on nature, place, and environment." Pays: "£250 for prose, £100 for poetry."
• Closing to poetry submissions July 1: Canada-based MINOLA REVIEW, which welcomes work "from all those who identify as women and non-binary writers." Pays: $25 per published poem presumably in Canadian dollars). Note also that they're open to book review pitches and, beginning with their September issue, will pay $20 per published 250–500 word review. (Thanks to WOW! Women on Writing's Markets Newsletter for the reminder about this one.)

• SUBSTANTIALLY UNLIMITED, which "welcomes submissions from anyone who considers themselves disabled, or substantially limited, socially, emotionally, cognitively, or mentally," remains open for submissions on the theme of "stigma" until July 1. Pays: "$15 per published piece via Venmo or Paypal." (Hat tip: @Duotrope.)

• Australia-based podcast PILLOW TALKING "is always looking for first person, narrative/creative nonfiction stories of real-life bedroom conversations. In fact, this podcast wouldn't exist without people choosing to share their intimate conversations. Whether they are thought-provoking, funny, heart-breaking or silly this takes trust, vulnerability and some guts, and I consider receiving each story a huge privilege and responsibility. You can submit from wherever in the world you happen to be." Upcoming themes include "Blue" (with a June 4 deadline); "Suddenly Strangers" (June 18); and "Sanctuary" (July 2). Payment: "$25AUD, paid via PayPal or Stripe, within 1 week of the episode going to air."

• From new journal BROKEN GLASS: "Do you write poetry? Tell stories? Conduct interesting interviews? If so, send us your work. We are starting a new digital magazine and want to hear from you! We focus on moments that embody change that help readers experience perspective-altering inspiration, with an emphasis on show over tell. Art, video, fiction, non-fiction, interviews, investigative reporting, fashion, design, book reviews and more - if it fits our focus, we'd love to see your work. Submissions are free, and we offer honoraria of $50–200 for each piece selected to be published." No deadline explicitly stated, but "submissions will be reviewed starting July 1."

• It may seem that lots of journals close for subs during the northern hemisphere's summer, and, yes - many do! But some remain open year-round. CRAFT is one. Pays: "$100 for original flash and $200 for original short fiction and creative nonfiction." They also publish "essays on writing craft, critical literary analyses, book annotations/reviews, and interviews….All work in this section is concerned with fiction or creative nonfiction. Please do not send critical work about poetry, film, or any other genres….We pay $50 for craft and critical essays, and we pay $50 for most standard interviews and $100 for hybrid interviews (a critical essay paired with a Q&A)."

• Similarly, FRACTURED LIT "is open year-round and is available to all writers. We currently feature two separate submission categories, based on the length of the work submitted: Micro Fiction, for work under 400 words; and Flash Fiction, for work 401–1,000 words." Pays: "$50 for original micro fiction and $75 for original flash fiction."

• Reminder from THE MASTERS REVIEW: "Our New Voices category is open year round to any new or emerging author who has not published a work of fiction or narrative nonfiction of novel length with a wide distribution. Authors with short story collections are free to submit, as are writers with books published by indie presses." Pays: "We pay New Voices authors $200 for short fiction and narrative non-fiction, and $100 for flash-length narratives (up to 1,000 words)."

• Likewise, at FRONTIER POETRY "submissions for our New Voices poetry category are open year round to any new and emerging poet who has not published more than one full-length collection of poetry. New Voices are published online only and will feature a number of poems from new authors each month." Payment: "$50 per poem, up to $150."

• THE SUN welcomes submissions of personal essays, fiction, and poetry. "Personal stories that touch on political and cultural issues are welcome." Pay rates: $300-$2,000 for essays and fiction; $100-$250 for poetry.

• Another one that's open year-round: THE WEST REVIEW, "a literary journal founded on the West Coast that seeks to promote and publish quality literature from our local, national, and international communities, which pays $10/poem and prose piece (via Paypal). NB: "We are primarily a poetry journal & only very rarely publish fiction. Prior to submitting, please read the prose included in prior issues to see if your work would be a good match."

• ORCA, which "publishes short stories and flash fiction, and a limited amount of nonfiction," offers space for 100 free submissions each month. "If the fee-free submission forms do not appear, it means the 100 free submissions have been used for that month, and the free portals will reopen at the start of the next month." They publish three issues each year: "two literary issues and one literary-speculative." Payment: "$50 for published short stories and $25 for flash fiction." (Thanks to Nancy Ludmerer for alerting me to the fee-free submissions policy.)

• From CREATIVE NONFICTION: "We're looking for writing about writing - smart and insightful ideas related to the art, craft, history, or philosophy of creative nonfiction." Check the guidelines for details on what they're looking for (and what they're not looking for), and note that they seem especially interested right now in pitches addressing "voice in creative nonfiction" and flash nonfiction. "This is a paying market," but pay rates aren't specified; no deadline is specified, either.

• Reminder: SHORT STORY, which aims to "revive the art of the short story, support artists, and produce something wonderful," selects one story for publication each month and considers reprints. Pays: "base pay of $100 for the chosen story + 50% of subscription revenue to be sent by Paypal, Zelle, or check."
• And another reminder: Make it a habit to check the CHICKEN SOUP FOR THE SOUL website, where titles in development are posted. "If this is your first time, please visit our Story Guidelines page." Pays: $200 plus 10 free copies.
REMEMBER: Some venues listed in last month's newsletter remain open for submissions.

6. BLOG NOTES

The newsletter is published just once each month, but there's always something new on the Practicing Writing blog:
• (Monday) Markets and Jobs for Writers (including opportunities that don't make it into the monthly newsletter)
• Midweek Notes from a Practicing Writer
• (Friday) Finds for Writers
• Sunday Sentence
Please visit, comment, and subscribe!
Interested in matters of specifically Jewish literary and cultural interest? Please also visit the My Machberet blog ("machberet" is the Hebrew word for "notebook").

7. NEWSLETTER MATTERS

Information contained in The Practicing Writer is researched carefully but readers should always verify information. The Practicing Writer and its editor disclaim any liability for the use of information contained within. Thank you for following/reading.
We value our subscribers, and we protect their privacy. We keep our subscriber list confidential.
About the editor: Erika Dreifus is a writer, teacher, and literary consultant whose books include Birthright: Poems and Quiet Americans: Stories. A Fellow in the Sami Rohr Jewish Literary Institute and an adjunct associate professor at Baruch College/CUNY, she lives in New York. Please visit ErikaDreifus.com to learn more about her work and follow her on Facebook and/or Twitter, where she tweets "on matters bookish and/or Jewish."

Funds for Writers's Latest List
Message from Hope
Book Riot, a daily newsletter of sorts, recently put out a piece about DIY reading retreats. Not writing retreats, mind you, but getaways where you read to your heart's content.
I swear, I drooled over that article. Then I started taking notes. Then I decided somewhere I'm writing an article on this . . . but of course, I might have to practice doing my DIY reading retreat and write from personal experience first.
I want to do that so badly, and while I've spoken of writing retreats, for the life of me I do not understand why I've never contemplated one to purely read. I started listing what to do:
1) designate the time/days
2) pick a place, whether your back porch, spare bedroom, or a trip elsewhere
3) pick the clothes, socks, and cozy-factor
4) pick the books, with a variety
5) pick the snacks, drinks, and meals
6) restrict the social media and phone usage (i.e., set the times you use them)
7) pack a special notebook and a very special pen or two
8) pick the seat, blanket, pillow, chair, etc.
9) isolate and bring it all, or have things brought to you, like in a B&B
Give yourself time frames or an agenda . . . or go rogue with no time constraints.
To a lot of us writer-types, seclusion is pure heaven, being sequestered in the place of your dreams just reading stories. We're always squeezing in our reading and writing time. Imagine being untethered by obligations or writing deadlines. Just you and the words in your hand.
C. Hope Clark
Editor, FundsforWriters
Email Hope | Visit Website | Sign up for Newsletter
Newsletter: ISSN: 1533–1326
FFW has proudly been on the Writer's Digest's 101 Best Websites for Writers list every year since 2001
Our subscriber list is NOT made available to others. Use information listed at your own risk. FundsforWriters gives no warranty to completeness, accuracy, or fitness of the markets, contests, and grants although research is done to the best of our ability.
TWITTER - http://twitter.com/hopeclark
AUTHOR SITE - http://www.chopeclark.com
FACEBOOK - http://www.facebook.com/chopeclark
GOODREADS - http://www.goodreads.com/hopeclark
BOOKBUB - https://www.bookbub.com/authors/c-hope-clark
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Jane Friedman publishes Electric Speed which has lots of market and writing resources.


Recently I was speaking on a panel about email newsletters when I realized I was a significant outlier compared to my fellow panelists. I don't send as frequently as most, I don't study my metrics, and I don't follow best practices on email length or subscriber retention.

Could I be doing better if I modified my practices? Maybe. Probably. (OK, certainly.)
But what's more important to me is sustainability. I'm only willing to do what I can reasonably sustain for years. I alone am responsible for staving off my own burnout. If I get tired of doing my work, there is no one else to step in. (For the most part. I have my husband, Mark, to thank for freeing up my time to focus on writing and teaching. But he can't write or teach for me if I grow tired of it.)

Recently, I saw this tweet from Ben Orenstein: "I got asked for some advice about starting a podcast. My #1 tip: there's a 95% chance you'll quit within a year, so spend ~all your effort avoiding that outcome. Everything else rounds to unimportant."
What does that mean?

You can ignore best practices. You can ignore all the things you "must" do. Instead, set up your own parameters that make it likely you will stick with your new activity.

Later on, when you have better footing - and valuable experience in the trenches - you can decide how to level up your game and what additional effort might be worthwhile.

But don't make the game so hard to continue that you stop before you've even really started. "Bias for survival," as Orsentein said.
Jane

P.S. The most popular blog post at my site this month:

Why Agents Don't Give Feedback - And Where to Get It Instead
P.P.S. There is more to this newsletter. Keep scrolling!

ISSUE SPONSOR

Get a top-tier writing education.

At our distinguished low-residency creative writing MFA, you'll thrive in a flexible, encouraging environment while you receive more faculty feedback than in less rigorous programs. Stay in the historic Brown Hotel near campus or study abroad. Affordable tuition; financial aid. www.Spalding.edu/mfa

Learn more at a virtual open house June 26.
Sponsorships help support Electric Speed.
Jane's Electric Speed List

Here are some of the latest things I've discovered. (I am not paid to mention any of these resources; there are no affiliate links.)

Accidentally write a whole paragraph in ALL CAPS?
Yep, it happens to the best of us. And then you have to retype the whole thing. Unless you have Convertcase. Quickly and easily fix your shouting.

Search for specific phrases in movies

This is pretty magical: Type in a phrase of any kind, and PlayPhrase will play movie scenes featuring that phrase. I tried "Stop bothering me." (I admit my cat, Zelda, was interfering with my keystrokes as I typed this one.) You're limited to five searches for free.

A face search engine that's a bit creepy

I found out about PimEyes from a New York Times article. Basically it's a Google image search for faces. The results are insanely accurate and far reaching, at least when I ran a search on myself.
Quickly turn web content into an ebook

EpubPress is a browser-based tool that gathers up whatever online content you specify, and creates an EPUB (ebook) file out of it. You can then load up your EPUB onto your preferred reading device. I hope it goes without saying, but this tool is for personal use only; do not violate anyone's copyright by publishing and/or distributing the resulting file. H/t Dense Discovery

NEXT ONLINE CLASS

June 29: Query Letter Master Class with Jane Friedman
The query letter has one purpose, and one purpose only: to seduce the agent or editor into reading or requesting your work. Learn the best practices of query writing (in any genre) and submit your work with confidence.

Your turn: search engine hacks

In the last issue, I asked you to tell me about your favorite search engine hacks. Here's what you said:
• Search bangs at DuckDuckGo. It's a shortcut to a site. For instance, if I want to search Wikipedia, I type !wiki Tom Cruise into the search bar and I'll end up at Tom's Wikipedia page. There are thousands of search bangs out there, such as !a for Amazon and !gm for Google Maps. See them all. - Bob Mueller

• I think we get too complacent with Google and forget that it often doesn't immediately provide us the things we really need or want. I've grown to like WebCrawler. It is the oldest search engine that still exists today. Another good one is Dogpile. It aggregates results from the search engines Google, Yahoo, and Yandex. - Cindy Bahl

Next question: Any TikTok users here? Tell me about one of your favorite accounts. Hit reply to this message to let me know, or share on the Discord server for Electric Speed subscribers.

Free resources featuring Jane

• July 12: Niche marketing versus general marketing
• Aug. 9: The role of author websites in the social media era
Upcoming online classes
• June 29: Query Letter Master Class with Jane Friedman
• July 8: Build a Business Model for Your Writing Career with Jane Friedman
• July 13: Analyze Story Like an Editor with Tiffany Yates Martin
• July 21: Build a Powerful Email Newsletter with Jane Friedman
• Aug. 11: Today's Key Book Publishing Paths with Jane Friedman
• Sep. 22: Blogging Strategies That Work in 2022 with Jane Friedman
More than 20,000 people read Electric Speed
Subscribe here | Browse archive | Sponsor an issue
"At electric speed, all forms are pushed to the limits of their potential."
 - Marshall McLuhan

WHQ out of the UK is also a great resource with lots of free classes and contests.
Well hello there Jake

It's Monday, and that means it's time to make a plan for the writing week ahead.
Luckily for you, your WHQ membership gives you access to a whole load of FREE courses, resources and assorted sauces to help you get that story of yours written, edited, and sent out into the world. Yes, we're sliding into your inbox this morning to remind you how GREAT it is to be a WHQ member. Sorrynotsorry.
New round these parts and not sure where to begin? Or maybe you're a seasoned member who needs a little kick up the backside to get going. Either way, get stuck into one of these FREE courses:
• Trying to nail that novel plot? Make a start with your outline using the literary magic of Write a Tiny Novel >>
• Already got a first draft and in need of some help to redraft and betterise your words? (Yes that's a real word, shh, we're writers.) Head on over to Editing 101 >>
• Or maybe flash fiction is more your thing. If so, try this bad boy out for size: Five Days of Flash >>
• And hey, maybe you just want a lil' hand holding to get you over that writing slump and inject some OOMPH into your creative practice again. Let us help you out with The Writers' HQ Guide to Productivity >>
And of course there's the usual host of weekly events to help you stop fucking about and start writing, which are handily listed just down there… 👇 👇 👇

Nate Hoffder publishes a weekly market survey newsletter.

Here are a few stories to read this Monday morning.
• Does Scrabble (or rather, its point system) need to be fixed?
• The UK Society of Authors has come out against hybrid publishers. My position is that authors should understand that they are effectively hiring the hybrid publisher to do work for them, and act accordingly.
• Publishing Contracts 101.
• The Onyx BOOX Poke4 Lite runs Android 11 and costs $150.
• There's a Kickstarter campaign in the UK which wants to print books with Dyslexia-friendly fonts. Given that there is no single font which works for all dyslexics, I think ebooks are the better option.
• Irish libraries are plagued by a whole host of problems related to ebooks - most of which are the fault of publishers.
P.S. If I might have a moment of your time for market research, I was thinking of getting these designs printed as door hangers. Would you buy one? Which one?

Writers Digest has almost daily good articles. They also have a weekly poetry prompt, and two month long poetry challenges in November and April

BUILD MY PLATFORM
Writing Mistakes Writers Make: Not Having an Online Presence

The Writer's Digest team has witnessed many writing mistakes over the years, so we started this series to help identify them for other writers (along with correction strategies). This week's writing mistake is not having an online presence.
BY MORIAH RICHARDJUN 24, 2022
Poetry Superhighway's latest Market newsletter

• Sponsor the 2022 Poetry Super Highway Poetry Contest!
Over 140 prizes have been offered by 50 sponsors so far! We're looking for prize donations for our 25th annual summer poetry contest. If you'd like to donate, books, subscriptions, services, or anything of specific interest to Poets and Writers in exchange for a promotional mention in our classified section and all contest correspondence for the duration of the contest, please CLICK HERE for all the details. (The contest will begin in mid-July and sponsors are eligible to enter.)
________________________________________
• This week features poets from Fort Lauderdale, Florida, and Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.
• 6 New poetry and writing website links were added this week.
• Flame at Door and Raisin and Other Stories by Alex Frankel featured this week in the PSH Bookstore.
• PSH LIVE - June Open Reading archived. Next Show: Conversation with 2022 PSH Poetry Contest Judges, Sunday, July 31 at 2 pm (pacific)
________________________________________POETS OF THE WEEK
This week's featured poets are Elisa Albo and Colin James Croal Jackson:
Elisa Albo (Fort Lauderdale, Florida) was born in Havana. A contributing editor of Grabbed: Poets and Writers on Sexual Harassment, Empowerment, and Healing, her poetry chapbooks are Passage to America, based on her family immigrant story, and Each Day More, a collection of elegies. Her poems have appeared in journals and anthologies such as Alimentum, Bomb Magazine, Crab Orchard Review, InterLitQ, MiPoesias, Notre Dame Review, SWWIM Every Day, and Two-Countries: U.S. Daughters and Sons of Immigrant Parents, Irrepressible Appetites, and Vinegar and Char. Nominated in 2021 for Best of the Net, she is an award-winning professor of English and ESL at Broward College, where she co-produces the Seahawk Writing Conference and teaches a food and film course.
James Croal Jackson (Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania) is a Filipino-American poet who works in film production. He has three chapbooks: Count Seeds With Me (Ethel Zine & Micro-Press, 2022), Our Past Leaves (Kelsay Books, 2021), and The Frayed Edge of Memory (Writing Knights, 2017). He edits The Mantle Poetry.
Read their poetry HERE.
________________________________________NEW POETRY AND WRITING WEBSITE LINKS
Here are all of the new sites added to the Poetry Super Highway's Poetry and Writing links sections:
Find thousands more links to poetry and writing websites in our online Link Directory. Click HERE to add your poetry/writing website to our directory.

New Online Poetry Resources:

Line Rider Press
Line Rider Press is a working-class poetry website and book publisher that seeks to showcase class-conscious, counter-cultural, and human-centered poetry and viewpoints. We feature a new poem on our homepage every week, publish artwork, reviews/essays, interviews with poets, and release poetry books annually.
New Online Publications:
Beacon Press
Beacon Press is an independent publisher of serious non-fiction, poetry and more.
New Online Publications:
International Literary Quarterly, the
The mission of The International Literary Quarterly is to provide a forum for outstanding writers, personally invited by the review, and among the most gifted of their generation.
Awakened Voices Magazine
Awakenings is dedicated to making visible the artistic expression of survivors of sexual violence.
Subnivean
Subnivean never flees from chilling poems, penetrating stories, and words that whip our perspectives around. Housed at the State University of New York at Oswego, where 4x more snow falls on our city than Manhattan, we've learned to persist. When winter comes, we reject migration. We use the cold itself as insulation.
New Individual Poets Pages:
Penofthepeople
It is the website for Jennifer Nuesi's book titled THINGS. It is a journey through heartbreak, depression and loss while dealing with the cruelty that anxiety brings.
Grabbed
An anthology of poets and writers on sexual assault, empowerment, and healing.
Publishing and other Forms of Insanity June market list
106 Calls for Submissions in June 2022 - Paying markets

This June there are more than seven dozen calls for submissions. All of these are paying markets, and none charge submission fees. As always, every genre, style, and form is wanted, from short stories to poetry to essays.
I post calls for submissions a few days prior to the first day of every month. But as I am collecting them, I post them on my page, Calls for Submissions. You can get a jump on next month's calls for submissions by checking that page periodically throughout the month. (I only post paying markets.)

Also see Paying Markets for hundreds of paying markets arranged by form and genre.
Happy submitting!
(Image: Pixabay)
______________________
Vastarien. Genre: Horror. Fiction, nonfiction, poetry, art. Payment: 5 cents/word for prose; $50 for poetry and art. Deadline: Opens June 1. Submissions close when they reach their cap of 300.
Cutleaf. Genre: Fiction of all shapes and sizes. Length: Less than 6,000 words. Payment: $100 to $400. Deadline: Opens June 1. (Will close after first 100 submissions)
Stanchion. Genre: Short stories (3000-ish word max), flash fiction, creative nonfiction, poetry, prose poems, stray thoughts, short screenplays, monologues, experimental work, interviews with inanimate objects, comics, black & white photography (vertical, portrait-oriented images are preferred), black & white drawings, black & white collage art, and other evocative images of mixed media artwork (also, you guessed it, in black and white). Payment: $10. Deadline: POETRY WINDOW (June 1–3) NON-POETRY WINDOW (June 5–7) VISUAL ART WINDOW (June 9–11)
Bethlehem Writers Roundtable. Genre: Short stories and poetry. See themes. Payment: 20.00 USD for featured authors, or $10.00 USD for stories published on their &More page and $5.00 USD for poems. Deadline: June 1, 2022.
Contrary. Genre: Poetry, fiction, CNF. Payment: $20. Deadline: June 1, 2022.
Totally Entwined: Secret Santa. Genre: Novellas, 30,000–50,000 words. Theme: Christmas Secrets. LGBTQ focus. Payment: Royalties. Deadline: June 1, 2022.
The Growlery. Genre: Essays in the 500–1000 word range. Topics: What The Hell Am I Thinking: Writers On Why They Write. Greatest Misses: Writers On Failure. Killer Reviews. Writers love and fear reader reviews at the same time, which is what makes them an interesting topic to explore. Payment: Contributors will receive 3–5 cents per word. Deadline: June 1, 2022.
Fieldnotes is a biannual print journal publishing new writing and artworks with a focus on practices that work between disciplines and against type. Genre: "We are seeking non-conforming submissions: ideas in transition, poetry in translation, collaborations and conversations, works between genres, between fiction and theory, between text and image, new poetic modes and things-in-progress." Payment: £100-£200. Deadline: June 1, 2022.
Consequence Forum. Genre: Flash nonfiction focused on the human consequences and realities of war and geopolitical violence. Length: 500–900 words. Payment: $25. Deadline: June 1, 2022.
Scorched Earth Press: Cars Against Humanity! Genre: Nonfiction pieces whose goal is to illuminate the many ways in which cars, and the infrastructure built to support them, constrict (human) life. "We want the essays in this volume to help readers understand the deadly automotive ecologies that have emerged around the world over the past century." Payment: $50. Deadline: June 1, 2022.
Olit. Restrictions: Strong preference for Orlando based writers/submissions about Orlando and surrounding areas. Genre: Fiction, Nonfiction, Poetry, Hybrid, Artwork, Photography. "Send us all kinds of stuff. We love the artfully weird." Payment: $10. Deadline: June 1, 2022.
Parabola. Genre: Original essays and translations, poetry, reviews. Payment: Not specified. Deadline: June 1, 2022. See themes.
Eternal Haunted Summer. Genre: Poetry, short fiction about Other-Than-Human Realms. Payment: $5. Deadline: June 1, 2022.
Massachusetts Review. Restrictions: Open to writers and poets who identify as D/deaf, disabled, chronically ill, mentally ill, and/or neurodiverse. Genre: Fiction, poetry, hybrid, nonfiction. Payment: $100. Deadline: June 1, 2022.
The Offing: Enumerate. Genre: "Enumerate is our department of cataloging, of naming, of listing. It features work that is hybrid - cross-genre, and work in all genres (fiction, CNF, flash, poetry) - as long as it uses the form of a list (which you may interpret widely). Any length, any subject, any medium (i.e. text, video, photo, music, etc.). The lists should add up to some kind of literary foray, exploration, meditation, commentary, collage." Payment: $25–$100. Deadline: June 1, 2022.
Cosmic Roots and Eldritch Shores. Genre: Speculative stories. Payment: 8 cents/word for original work. 2 cents/word for reprints. Deadline: June 1–2, 2022.
Pillow Talking (Podcast). Genre: First person, narrative/creative nonfiction stories of real-life bedroom conversations. Theme: Blue. Payment: $25AUD. Deadline: June 4, 2022.
Havok. Genre: Flash fiction on Theme of LAZINESS / DILIGENCE. Payment: $10 via PayPal for each story published in an Anthology. Deadline: June 5, 2022.
Mslexia. Restrictions: Open to women writers. Genre: Fiction and poetry on theme: cogs and spindles, locking and unlocking - and what lies inside. Stories must be no longer than 2,200 words (which translates to a 15-minute radio broadcast slot) and poems up to 40 lines (the maximum that can comfortably fit onto a single page of the magazine). There is no lower word or line limit. You may send up to four poems and/or up to two stories on any one theme. Payment: £25. Deadline: June 6, 2022.
Cossmass Infinities. Genre: Science fiction and fantasy short stories. Payment: $0.08/word for original fiction. Deadline: June 7, 2022.
Scum. Genre: Feminist-friendly work of any variety, but as a general rule your piece should be under 2000 words (50 lines for poetry, max. 3 poems) and able to be classified as "fiction", "culture", "memoir", "column", "poetry", and/or "review". Payment: $60 AUD. Deadline: June 7, 2022. Opens to submissions on June 1.
Coastal Shelf. Genre: Fiction, nonfiction, poetry. Payment: $20 - $30. Deadline: June 7, 2022. Opens to submissions on June 1.
Diet Milk Magazine: Gothic. Genre: Gothic fiction, poetry, and art (drawings, paintings, comics, collages). Payment: $0.01/word for fiction (minimum $40); $15/poem; $50/art piece. Deadline: June 8, 2022.
Bright Wall/Dark Room. Genre: Essays on film and TV that engage in some way with the term voyeur. Payment: $50 per essay. Deadline: June 8, 2022.
Antithesis. Genre: Poetry, research articles, art, and short fiction, creative nonfiction, and personal essays up to 3,500 words on the theme of Tender. Payment: $50 AUD. Deadline: June 12, 2022.
Fusion Fragment. Genre: Science fiction or SF-tinged literary fiction stories and novelettes ranging anywhere from 2,000 to 15,000 words. Payment: Both previously unpublished work and reprints pay 3.5 cents (CAD) per word, up to a maximum of $300 (CAD) per story. Deadline: June 12, 2022. Opens June 10.
Mary Celeste. Genre: Horror. "Mutiny? Piracy? Or one of the ocean's greatest ghost stories? That's up to you! We all know of the mystery surrounding the Mary Celeste's 1872 voyage, but how many of us can really guess what happened? For this first volume, we'd love to see your interpretations. Our advice: think outside the box. There's only so many places those crew members could have gone… or is there something we haven't considered?" Payment: $10. Deadline: June 13, 2022.
Extra Teeth. Genre: Short fiction and nonfiction between 800 and 4,000 words. "We look for short stories that stick with you, lingering in the memory long after reading, and essays that explore specific interests or issues from a new perspective. We offer a space for writers to be strange, bold and experimental, and to express their unique style however they see fit." Payment: £100. Deadline: June 14, 2022.
Farmer-ish. Genre: Nonfiction, CNF, poetry related to farming (including recipes). Payment: $25. Deadline: June 14, 2022. See themes.
Plainsongs. Genre: Poetry. Payment: $50. Deadline: June 15, 2022.
Muse Magazine. Genre: Nonfiction articles for children. Payment: Not specified. Deadline: June 15, 2022. See themes.
Baffling. Genre: Speculative flash fiction. Length: Under 1200 words. Payment: 8 cents/word. Deadline: June 15, 2022.
The Dire Dark. Genre: Fantasy Horror. Payment: $.01 for Reprints. $.02 for Originals. Deadline: June 15, 2022.
Home Sweet Horror. Genre: Haunted houses, cursed dwellings, terrors close to home. Payment: Royalties. Deadline: June 15, 2022.
Midnight Echo. Restrictions: Open to Australians. Genre: Horror fiction, poetry, and non-fiction on horror-related subjects. Payment: AU$0.05/word for fiction. Deadline: June 15, 2022.
Medusa Tales. Genre: Speculative stories (sci-fi, fantasy, and horror) of human transformation and immobilization. Payment: 1 cent/word, $10 for reprints. Deadline: June 15, 2022. Accepts reprints.
The Four Faced Liar. Genre: Fiction and creative non-fiction (up to 4000 words); flash fiction (up to 1000 words); poetry (up to 3 pages); visual art (1 piece); translations. Payment: €200 for a short story or CNF piece, €100 for a poem or piece of flash, and €100 for visual art, as well as a copy of the magazine for each contributor. Deadline: June 15, 2022.
Bell Press Books. Genre: Poetry. Payment: $15 CAD, Deadline: June 15, 2022.
Bell Press Books. Genre: Poetry, CNF, art, fiction on theme: Rituals. Payment: $15 CAD, Deadline: June 15, 2022.
Bell Press Books. Restrictions: Canadians only. Genre: Poetry, CNF, art, fiction on theme: Framework of the Human Body. Payment: $15 CAD, Deadline: June 15, 2022.
Bull City Press. Genre: Poetry, Fiction, Nonfiction Chapbooks. Payment: Royalties (?) Deadline: June 15, 2022.
Channel. Genre: Fiction, art, creative non-fiction, and poetry that engages with the natural world, and have a particular interest in work which encourages reflection on human interaction with plant and animal life, landscape and the self. Payment: €40/poem, and €50/page of prose up to €150. Deadline: June 15, 2022.
Fourteen Poems Genre: Poetry. "We want to represent all that's thrilling about the new wave of LGBT+ poets. If you're a poet, even if you've never been published before, we want to read your work. Every issue we publish 14 of the best queer poems we've found, and we want to include you! We publish 4 times a year, but take submissions all year round. To be considered, email up to 5 poems, preferably in a pdf format, with a small paragraph about yourself to hello@14poems.com. Payment: £25 for each poem published. Deadline: June 15, 2022.
Eye to the Telescope. Genre: Speculative poetry. Payment: $0.03/word, up to $25. Deadline: June 15, 2022. See theme.
Grain Literary Magazine is a Canadian publication. Genres: Individual poems, sequences, or suites up to a maximum of 6 pages, fiction, literary nonfiction. Payment: $50 per page up to $250. Deadline: June 15, 2022.
White Enso. Genre: Original, unpublished short fiction, essays, creative non-fiction and artwork that encapsulates the Japan experience. Payment: Between 1000 and 1500 yen (US$10-$15). Deadline: June 15, 2022.
Dracula Beyond Stoker Magazine. Genre: "Stories with Dracula himself as the main focus. His name is on the cover of the book, but he's not the star of the show. Let's change that." Some poetry accepted. Payment: "Compensation will be monetary plus contributor's copies." Deadline: June 15, 2022.
Kaleidoscoped. Genre: Poetry, prose, media. "We are particularly interested in experimental and hybrid work across all mediums: send us your fragments, your experiments, your photographs, your drawn, your multi, your undefinable, your sound, your memory, your written, your stuff of resistance." Payment: "Small sum." Deadline: June 15, 2022.
Archive of the Odd. Genre: Horror. Submissions must relate to the theme of monsters and also be non-traditional prose. Length: 500 to 8,000 words. Payment: $0.01/word for short stories chosen for the zine, and an even split of 50% of the royalties. Deadline: June 15, 2022.
Mythulu Magazine. Genre: Capture an adulthood dilemma so universal it transcends culture and time - -then explain it so a child can understand. Payment: $0.06/word or $15/page. Non-fiction pays $0.08/word. Creative works earn $0.04/word, with short stories capped at $75. Deadline: June 16, 2022.
The Bureau Dispatch. Genre: For 2022, we're in the market for 15 to 20 short stories between 500 to 1,500 words. We want your best work. We want fiction that is compelling and beautifully-crafted; narratives that leave the reader breathless and changed. The kind of story that, when all is said and done, elicits a resounding "sh*t, yeah!" We are open to all narratives, but are currently partial to ones that explore the theme of epistolary stories and/or found things. Payment: $50. Deadline: June 17, 2022.
Foyer. Genre: Nonfiction and art "exploring untold stories from people of mixed, third culture and second-generation cultural heritage" on the theme of "Connect." Payment: £75 - £100. Deadline: June 17, 2022.
Pillow Talking (Podcast). Genre: First person, narrative/creative nonfiction stories of real-life bedroom conversations. Theme: Suddenly, Strangers. Payment: $25AUD. Deadline: June 18, 2022.
Maine Review. Genre: Short fiction, poetry. Payment: Fiction and Nonfiction writers receive a $25 honorarium per published flash (1,000 words or fewer) and a $50 honorarium for work 1,001 words or more. Poets receive a $25 honorarium per published poem. Deadline: June 19, 2022. (Opens June 13)
The Cellar Door: Woodland Terrors. Genre: Horror/thriller stories that take place in or near the woods. Payment: $25. Deadline: June 20, 2022
Flash Fiction Online. Genre: Speculative (science fiction, fantasy, slipstream, and horror) and literary fiction. Payment: $80. Deadline: June 21, 2022. Accept reprints.
Dark Dispatch. Genre: Dark fantasy, sci-fi, horror, and crime short stories on theme: Outsiders. Payment: $25 - $75 depending on length. (up to 5,000 words.) Deadline: June 22, 2022.
Story Seed Vault. Genre: Fiction based on science. Up to 200 characters. Payment: Up to $3AUD per story. Deadline: June 24, 2022.
Black Ocean. Genre: Full-length poetry manuscripts, BIPOC poets only. Payment: Royalties. Deadline: June 24, 2022.
Monster. Genre: Original monster stories. Payment: 1 cent/word and royalties. Deadline: June 24, 2022.
Neon Hemlock. Genre: Speculative novellas by trans women writers and writers of color. Length: Up to 40,000 words. Payment: Royalties. Deadline: June 25, 2022.
The Puritan. Genres: Fiction, nonfiction, poetry. Payment: $100 per nonfiction piece, $50 fiction, $15 per poem. Deadline: June 25, 2022.
ongoing. Genre: Prose in any genre up to 1000 words based on musical prompt. Payment: 30CAD. Deadline: June 26, 2022.
I Wasn't Strong Like This When I Started Out: True Stories of Becoming a Nurse. Genre: Creative Nonfiction essays by and about nurses. "We're looking especially for pandemic-era stories, which examine the complex and essential role nurses of all kinds have played in providing care and guidance for patients and families, as well as the ways in which the pandemic has affected both individuals and the healthcare system." Payment: Unspecified. Deadline: June 27, 2022.
Rough Cut Press. Restrictions: Open to LGBTQIA writers. Genre: Experimental fiction, nonfiction, art poetry. 650 words max. Payment: $25. Deadline: June 27, 2022. See themes.
Metaphysical Times. Genre: Pagan and metaphysical topics, including spirituality, religion, divination, witchcraft, and more. Payment: $0.05 USD per word up to 1200 words after editing. Deadline: June 29, 2022.
Allegory. Genre: Science Fiction, Fantasy and Horror. Payment: $15. Deadline: June 30th, 2022.
Best Asian Speculative Fiction Anthology. Genre: Asian Speculative Fiction. Pieces should be set in an Asian country and must have Asian main characters. Payment: $5. Deadline: June 30th, 2022. Reprints only.
Ripe Literary Journal. Genre: Poetry. Payment: $5. Deadline: June 30th, 2022.
Poetry Birmingham Literary Journal. Genre: Poetry, art. Payment: £25 per page. Deadline: June 30th, 2022.
Quarter Press: Myths Fables, and Folklore. Genre: Stories, art, poetry, nonfiction on theme: Myths Fables, and Folklore. Payment: $5. Deadline: June 30th, 2022.
Cloud Lake Literary. Restrictions: Canadian writers. Genre: Fiction, art. creative nonfiction, poetry, and children's literature (up to and including YA). Payment: $50 CAD/per page to a maximum of $150. Visual Art Submission: $50 /per submission. Deadline: June 30, 2022.
Autonomous Press: Spoon Knife. Genre: Short fiction, short memoir, and poetry The theme for Spoon Knife 7 is transitions. Preference will be given to submissions that are in some way flavored with queerness and/or neuroqueerness. Payment: 1 cent per word. Deadline: June 30, 2022.
Downstate Story. Genre: Short stories. Payment: $50. Deadline: June 30, 2022. Snail mail only.
Dancing Star Press. Genre: Speculative fiction novellas. Payment: Royalties. Deadline: June 30, 2022.
Willowherb. Restrictions: Open to writers of color. Genre: Previously unpublished non-fiction, fiction and poetry on nature, place, and environment. Payment: £250 for prose, £100 for poetry. Deadline: June 30, 2022.
Lovecraft: An Compendium of Eldritch Humor. Genre: Dark speculative humor. "Dark Speculative fiction which combines humor and something from the Cthulhu Mythos." Payment: $0.04/word. Deadline: June 30th, 2022. Open until filled.
Green Writers Press. Genres: Poetry, fiction, short story collections, environmental essay collections, middle-grade, and YA/teen fiction, artwork, and photography. Green Writers Press is an independent, Vermont-based publishing company, is dedicated to spreading environmental awareness and social justice by publishing authors who promulgate messages of hope and renewal through place-based writing and environmental activism. Payment: Royalties. Deadline: June 30th, 2022.
Kernel. Genre: Short stories, poetry, and/or art that imagines the future. "We are invested in understanding how technology and technologists play an active role in doing so." Payment: $50 - $300. Deadline: June 30th, 2022.
Fairy Tale Review. Genre: Queer fairy tales written by queer writers. Poetry, art, drama, and prose. Payment: $50. Deadline: June 30th, 2022.
bath magic. Genre: Poetry. Payment: £20. Deadline: June 30, 2022.
Freeze Frame Fiction. Genre: Flash fiction. "Any genre, no content restrictions. We want your science fiction, fantasy, horror, mystery, drama, literary works, satire, bizarre fiction, or anything else you can come up with or mix. The more original, the better. The weirder, the better." Payment: $10. Deadline: June 30, 2022.
VALRAVN. Genre: "Wyrd fiction" short stories (3,000 to 10,000 words). Horror, Espionage/Thriller, Science Fiction, Fantasy. Payment: $0.10 per word. Deadline: June 30, 2022.
Type house. Restrictions: In honor of Pride Month, no-fee submissions are open for all LGBTQIA2+/Queer creators, not limited to those in the US. Genre: Prose, poetry, art. Payment: $25. Deadline: June 30, 2022.
Haven Speculative. Genre: Speculative fiction and poetry. Payment: 1 cent/word for fiction and $5 - $10 for poetry. Deadline: June 30, 2022.
Mythic. Genre: Science fiction, fantasy short stories. Length: 2,000–5,000 words. Payment: 1 cent/word for original fiction, $25 for reprints. Deadline: June 30, 2022.
The Hudson Review. Genre: Fiction, poetry, essays, book reviews; criticism of literature, art, theatre, dance, film, and music; and articles on contemporary cultural developments. Payment: Not specified. Deadline: June 30th, 2022. (Poetry only)
Dragon Soul Press: Beautiful Darkness. Genre: "In a world where so many dark things go bump in the night, terror awaits around every corner as these authors take horror stories to the next level." Word Count - 5,000–15,000. Payment: Royalties. Deadline: June 30th, 2022.
Chestnut Review. Genre: Poetry, flash fiction, short fiction, creative nonfiction, essays, visual media (art/photography). Payment: $120. Deadline: June 30th, 2022. Submit early in the month to avoid submission fee.
Cast of Wonders. Genre: YA Speculative fiction. Podcast. Payment: $.08/word for original fiction of any length (yes, including flash!). For reprints, a $100 flat rate for Short Fiction, and a $20 flat rate for Flash Fiction. Deadline: June 30th, 2022. Limited Demographic: Young Authors (aged 19 or under at end of June).
Soldiers of the Old Ones. Genre: Lovecraftian horror tales of the people who fight for, sacrifice for, and work toward the takeover of the world by the Old Ones. Payment: $25. Deadline: June 30th, 2022, or until filled.
Kids Are Hell. Genre: Horror on theme: Children. 4K - 10K word count. Payment: $5. Deadline: June 30, 2022.
Rites of Passage: An Anthology of Queer Pagan Fiction. Genre: Fiction. This anthology will explore the theme of coming of age as a queer pagan. Payment: $25-$75. Deadline: June 30, 2022.
Strange Sunrises: Tales from Distant Planets. Genre: Science fiction stories that take place on another planet. Payment: $30USD. Deadline: June 30, 2022.
Strange Aeon. Genre: Stories in a cosmic horror/Lovecraftian vein. Payment: $20 - $35. Deadline: June 30, 2022, or until filled.
The Quarterly. Genre: Poetry, fiction, art, analysis. "Works with fantastical elements: scary, happy, creepy, heartbreaking, bizarre, hilarious, whatever." Payment: $5, Deadline: June 30, 2022. See themes.
New Gothic Review. Genre: Dark, gothic fiction. Word count: 1,500–5,000 words. Payment: $65. Deadline: June 30, 2022.
Threadcount. Genre: Prose, poetry, fiction, nonfiction, and hybrid text. "We prefer writing that resists such classifications. Primarily we focus on hybrid works between prose poetry and flash fiction." Payment: $25. Deadline: June 30, 2022.
Chicken Soup for the Soul: Funny Stories. Genre: True stories. "Share your funny stories about something that happened to you in your life - in your relationship with a partner or spouse, a parent or child, a family member or friend, at work or at home - that made you and the people around you laugh out loud. Did you mean for it to be funny? Did the other person mean to make you laugh? Did a situation just get out of control? Did a misunderstanding turn into a comedy of errors?" Payment: $200. Deadline: June 30, 2022.
Air and Nothingness Press: The Librarian. Genre: Stories about one Librarian's adventures roving through the multiverse. Theme: "The Librarian travels the multiverse (along the timeline - passed through the future - and across planetary systems and universes) helping out people, societies, and those in need, with their questions, problems, and research (as librarians do). Looking for positive, hopeful stories with positive endings, and narratives that celebrate librarians." Ideal story lengths are between 1000–3000 words. Payment: $0.08/word. Deadline: June 30, 2022.
Mud Season Review. Genre: Short stories, art, poetry, CNF. Payment: $50. Deadline: June 30th, 2022.
Game Over Books is a small Black and Queer-owned and operated publisher run collaboratively by a group of writers and working artists. "Our goal is to bust down the gatekeepers of traditional publishing while printing high-quality books by diverse writers. We strive to make our editing and publishing process honest, transparent and inclusive." Genre: Poetry and/or prose (fiction, non-fiction, poetry, essays, hybrid, etc.) manuscripts. Payment: Royalties (?) Deadline: June 30th, 2022.
Dark Matter: Monstrous Futures. Genre: Dark sci-fi with an emphasis on exploring our connection with technology and one another through speculative concepts and backdrops. Word Limit: 2000–4000 words, no exceptions. Payment: 8 cents/word. Deadline: June 30, 2022.
Brigid's Gate: Dangerous Waters: Deadly Women of the Sea. Genre: Short stories, poetry, and drabbles. "Theme: We're looking for horror or dark fantasy stories, poems, and drabbles about malevolent mermaids, sinister sirens, scary selkies, spirits, and other deadly and dangerous women of the sea. Stories including the ocean or sea are the focus of the anthology, but we will consider stories involving rivers as well." Payment: Stories: $0.08 a word; Poems: $50 a poem; Drabbles: $50 a drabble. Deadline: June 30, 2022.
Gollancz (an imprint of Hachette). Genre: Science fiction, fantasy, horror novels. Payment: Royalties, advance. Deadline: June 30, 2022.
Kaleidotrope. Genre: Speculative fiction and poetry - science fiction, fantasy, and horror, but also compelling work that blurs the lines between these and falls outside of neat genre categories. Payment: For fiction, $0.01/word (1 cent a word) USD. For poetry, a flat rate of $5 USD per accepted piece. For artwork, a flat rate of $60 for cover art. Deadline: June 30, 2022.
And a few more…
Les Petites Morts: An Anthology of Erotic Horror Inspired by Fairy Tales, Mythology & Folklore. Opens July 1. Deadline: TBA
Substantially Unlimited. Restrictions: Open to writers who identify as part of the disability community. Genre: Prose, up to 15 pages. Theme: Stigma. Payment: $15. Deadline: July 1, 2022. Reprints accepted.
The Cafe Irreal. Genre: Magical realism. 2,000 words max. Payment: 1 cent/word. Deadline: July 1, 2022.
Totally Entwined: Cupid's Academy. Genre: Novellas, 30,000–50,000 words. Theme: Enemies to lovers. LGBTQ focus. Payment: Royalties. Deadline: July 1, 2022.
The Twin Bill. Genre: Fiction, CNF, poetry, art about baseball. Payment: $10. Deadline: July 1, 2022.
Thema: The Crumpled Yellow Paper. Genre: Fiction, poetry, and art on theme: The Crumpled Yellow Paper. Payment: $10-$25 for short fiction and artwork, $10 for poetry. Deadline: July 1, 2022. Accepts reprints.
Horror Oasis: Darklit Press: The Sacrament. Genre: Religious Horror. Payment: $0.01 per word for new stories and/or $25 for reprints. Deadline: July 1, 2022. Accepts reprints.
It Came From the Trailer Park: Volume 2. Genre: Horror. Theme: Horror Comedy / Creature Feature. Payment: Royalties. Deadline: July 1, 2022.
Eerie River. Genre: Folk Horror. Word count: 1500–7000 firm. Payment: ¢1 per word CAD. Deadline: Deadline: July 1, 2022.
Alien Magazine. Genre: All types of fiction, nonfiction, poetry and visual art. Payment: $20. Deadline: July 1, 2022.
Unsettling Reads: Still of Winter. Genre: Horror, fantasy, scifi stories, poems, art. "Stories that unsettle, unnerve, frighten, discomfit, challenge, and/or just generally entertain on theme of Winter." Payment: $20. Deadline: July 1, 2022.
Minola Review. Restrictions: Open to women and non-binary writers. Genre: Poetry. Payment: $25. Deadline: July 1, 2022
Writer's beware newsletter great resource to research spam
A New Home For the Writer Beware Blog
Author: Victoria Strauss
Categories: Writer Beware
Welcome to the new home of the Writer Beware blog!
After many years on the Blogger platform, we have finally transitioned to WordPress, which offers much greater flexibility in terms of design, control, and ease of use.
We also have a new, easy to remember web address: writerbeware.blog.
I've been dissatisfied with Blogger for a while now. I'm not a web developer, but I'm not helpless, either; I maintain the Writer Beware website on the SFWA site, and I built and maintain two additional websites, my own and another for an organization my husband is part of. But every time I thought about moving to a new platform, the size of the challenge just seemed too daunting. How would I transfer hundreds of posts, not to mention the thousands of comments and images that go with them? What about all the non-working inbound links the move would create? Links wouldn't be a problem if I just started fresh on a brand-new WordPress site - but then the blog would exist on two platforms, with two different web addresses. And what about WB's thousands of followers and subscribers?
The turning point came last summer, when the only email subscription widget supported by Blogger discontinued service. If people couldn't subscribe to the WB blog, there was just no reason to remain on Blogger. But the amount of time and research involved in moving made me want to lie down and go to sleep (you may know that Writer Beware is a volunteer effort: I do this in my off hours).
Enter the Automattic Special Projects Team, which helps noteworthy and/or interesting people and projects with development, design, hosting services, and more. In an amazing bit of synchronicity, they contacted me around the same time that my subscription service disappeared, with an offer to not only build a new WordPress website for the WB blog, but to port all posts, comments, and subscribers to the new site and re-direct all Blogger links. In other words…to do all of the stuff I'd been dreading - and create a better and more functional site than I could have on my own.
After many months of design consults and bug fixes, this is the result. Not just a clean new look and way more administrative control for me, but a better subscription service and a much more robust search function (another peeve I had with Blogger, whose search options suck). I'm deeply grateful to the Special Projects Team for their hard work, and for their support of Writer Beware.
The one thing I'm sad to lose is our old web address: accrispin.blogspot.com. It's a legacy (one of many) of the late Ann Crispin, Writer Beware's co-founder, and my dear friend. Ann started the blog in 2005, originally intending it to be her blog; but after she invited me to join her, it quickly became all Writer Beware, all the time. Looking back at those posts reminds me of how much fun Ann and I had in those early days, and how profoundly her energy, fearlessness, and dedication shaped what Writer Beware has become. We're leaving behind a URL, but Ann is still present in everything we do.
If you've come here from a link on social media, please have a look around our new home and tell me what you think! If you're a subscriber, this is the first newsletter that has landed in your Inbox since last summer. I hope you'll continue to subscribe - and for those of you who are new to Writer Beware, I hope you'll consider signing up via the form below this post.
Don't forget that the blog is just one component of the many-headed beast that is Writer Beware. There's also our website, which provides a wide range of information, cautions, and resources to help writers educate and protect themselves; our Facebook page, which links to items of writerly interest and provides a forum for discussion; my Twitter feed, where I regularly post updates, warnings, and industry news; and our email address, beware@sfwa.org, where you can contact us - in confidence - with reports, complaints, and questions.
Finally, a huge THANK YOU to all the writers, agents, editors, and others who've shared complaints and documentation over the years and helped us build our database; to all the people who send me tips and information; to everyone who spreads the word about Writer Beware (and writing scams in general); and to our fans, followers, and subscribers. We couldn't do it without you, and we are grateful for your support.
Onward!
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Winning writers list


Cosmos Guide to where to submit
Cosmos Guide to where to submit
For my writer friends who are just getting started submitting works to literary journals, here are my suggestions and advice based on my four years of submitting to literary magazines and being published in over 150 places so far.
My advice for anyone starting on the submission game is to get the fundamentals down first.
Blog page and author email are essential
Before you submit anything, you need to set up a blog, make a preliminary spreadsheet for tracking, set up an author email., (including an email tracking system) a cover letter template, a folder to store your writing and an offsite backup - I use one drive and an external hard drive and back up every Sunday or before taking a trip.
Tracking System is a must
You need to set up a tracking system. Duotrope can handle it all for you but I double-track it with my spreadsheet. See attached for suggested headers. I use Google docs. There are several others out there but that's enough for now. Please feel free to let me know if you find out other useful sites.
Then put together whatever you want to submit, then look at the various market research sites I have included. and sign up for Duo trope - they will track your submission and send out a weekly market list. And finally, after submitting the update Duo trope and your spreadsheet.
Regarding the spreadsheet, I give each submission a topic so I can track my work. I have found that Microsoft word and One drive search engines are not very good so it is important to be able to track your work by topic.
The headers (columns) I use are
Status (rejected, accepted, withdrawn, re-write, the second submission? Sim okay? Deadline due)
vendor
additional vendors
topic
title
what submitted
format copied from web page submission guidelines
date of entry
date of submission
follow up due - default to three months
response date
response time
Duotrope entry date
update the date as needed
SIM ( note if the simultaneous submission is okay or not, Yes/No )
prior publication (note if prior publication is okay or not and what constitutes "unpublished, Yes/No, default to No if unclear )
re-submission date
prior submission date
title result
(copy from duo trope)
email
URL
address
POS
type of submission
–(email, online, submittable, duotrope. other)
Paid
Cost
source of info location
university affiliation
comments received
notes
additional comments received
I use google docs, Excel had too many bugs in it but any spreadsheet works fine, or access if you know how to use that. Duotrope will track things for you but I prefer to double-track my submissions. And I also post reminders on my daily to-do list as things come in. It is also important to track your submissions and writings in your email and your folders.
I try to save all items by category as I write them as I have found that Microsoft search feature to be not useful nor is One Drive any better.
Oh and one final point - pay attention to whether a site accepts reprints = most don't but they are pretty good at spelling out the rules - follow them!
The bottom line is don't submit until you have completed these preliminary steps.
If you don't have an author web page and an author Facebook page no one will take you seriously. Same thing if you don't have an author email. Once you start submitting you will soon be overwhelmed with emails. All the emails allow you to create more than one account. I use authorjakecosmosaller@gmail.com for my writing and jakecaller@gmail for everything else. The most common email is a simple author or writer followed by the rest of your email handle. The good thing is that if you have more than one account you will get additional storage space. I use one drive for my back-ups but have a G drive account where I store my spreadsheets.

Social Media as well
You also need a Twitter account, a LinkedIn account, and an Instagram account, but not a Pinterest, tumbler, TikTok, or YouTube account, but if you have them, include them.

The good news is if you use word press and install the social media share plug it, your work will be replicated on Twitter, tumbler, and LinkedIn for free, with additional sites available if you purchase the upgrade.

Duotrope A must
Duotrope is a great resource. I subscribed for 50 dollars a year.

You get the weekly market lists and they also keep track of your submissions,
The grinder is good as well and tracks as well.
There are other programs out there, Author Publish, Cathy's prompts, Publishing and Other Forms of Insanity are all good sources of market research as well as Facebook calls for submissions. I copy all these lists to a separate spreadsheet to keep track of them all, then copy them to my main spreadsheet as I get ready to submit.

The most recent duotrope email list follows

Duotrope Newsletter

You currently have 419 pending submissions. Now's a good time to take a minute to see if any of those reports need to be updated.
________________________________________
New Listings
[Legend: F=Fiction P=Poetry N=Nonfiction]
Paying publication listings added:

The International Amy MacRae Award for Memoir fee-based (N) TEMP
Museum Piece Anthology [Metaphorosis Publishing] (F)
New Rivers Press Chapbook Contest [New Rivers Press] fee-based (NPF)
Noema Magazine (NF)
Palette Chapbook Prize [Palette Poetry] fee-based (P)
Sublingua Prize for Poetry [Inverted Syntax] fee-based (P)
Superlative Flash Fiction Competition [Superlative: The Short Story Literary Journal] fee-based (F)
Superlative Mini Saga Competition [Superlative: The Short Story Literary Journal] (F)
Superlative Short Story Competition [Superlative: The Short Story Literary Journal] fee-based (F)
Superlative: The Short Story Literary Journal (NF)
Writing Battle fee-based (F) TEMP CLOSED
Non-paying publication listings added:
Daytona Sex (NPF)
Pocket Fiction (PF)
Black Sunflowers Poetry Press (P - fee-based)
Digging Through the Fat: A Journal for Cultural Omnivores (F - fee-based)
Eye to the Telescope (P)
Eyelands Book Awards (FNP - fee-based)
Intrepidus Ink (FN)
Liquid Imagination Ezine (FP)
Poetry Birmingham Literary Journal (P)
Prize Americana for Poetry (P - fee-based)
Riddled with Arrows Ars Poetica Prize (P - fee-based)
Riddled With Arrows Literary Journal (FNP)
Socrates on the Beach (FN)
Solarpunk Magazine (FNP)
Solarpunk Magazine Monthly Micro-Fiction Contest (F)
Tolsun Books (FNP - fee-based)
Wizards in Space Literary Magazine (FNP)
Non-paying publications that have recently opened to submissions:
Broken Glass (FN)
Coin-Operated Press Zines (FNP)
Hayden's Ferry Review (HFR) (FNP - fee-based)
Ice Lolly Review (FNP)
Mason Street: The Literary Magazine of Newark Public Library (FNP)
Pigeon Review (F)
Revue évolution (FNP)
Sad Girl Review (NP)
Untenured Magazine (FNP)
Upcoming Themed Deadlines

(6/24/2022) Hindsight: Black Lives Matter (N)
(6/24/2022) NEW! Sine Theta Magazine: Ember (NPF)
(6/24/2022) Hindsight: Presidential Election 2020 (N)
(6/24/2022) NEW! Coin-Operated Press Zines: Pride is a protest! (NPF)
(6/26/2022) Retreat West Themed Flash Fiction Competition: Margins (F - fee-based)
(6/27/2022) Focus on the Family: Tricky Kids (N)
(6/28/2022) Scottish Book Trust 50-Word Fiction Competition: Write a story featuring sunglasses (F)
(6/30/2022) Kit Sora Flash Fiction Photography Contest: "Burn" photo (F)
(6/30/2022) Hedgehog Poetry Press Pamphlet Competitions: A Slim Volume of One's Own (P - fee-based)
(6/30/2022) Tangled Locks Journal: Abortion (N - fee-based)
(6/30/2022) Azathoth: Ordo ab Chao Anthology: Azathoth (F)
(6/30/2022) redrosethorns Magazine: Connection/Community (NPF)
(6/30/2022) Dangerous Waters: Deadly Women of the Sea Anthology: Dangerous Waters: Deadly Women of the Sea (PF)
(6/30/2022) Flora Fiction Literary Magazine: Desire (PF)
(6/30/2022) Fiery Scribe Review Magazine: Dust (NPF)
(6/30/2022) Capsule Stories: Falling Leaves (NPF)
(6/30/2022) THE POET Anthology Series: Family (P)
(6/30/2022) 3cents Magazine: Growth (NPF)
(6/30/2022) Parhelion Literary Magazine: Halloween (F - fee-based)
(6/30/2022) Strange Aeon Anthology Series: Hopeful Monsters (NPF)
(6/30/2022) Didcot Writers Writing Competition: Just one word (NPF)
(6/30/2022) Lifespan Series: Marriage (NPF)
(6/30/2022) The Quarter(ly): Myths, Fables, and Folklore (NPF)
(6/30/2022) Dark Matter Presents: Monsters Series: NEar Future Monsters (F)
(6/30/2022) Dark Moments: Night of the Killer Flamingos (F)
(6/30/2022) The Vincent Brothers Review: Old Teachers (NF - fee-based)
(6/30/2022) The Gentian Journal: Postcards (P)
(6/30/2022) Isele Magazine: Queer Joy (NPF)
(6/30/2022) Negative Space Anthology Series: Return to Survival Horror (F)
(6/30/2022) Boston Review Annual Poetry Contest: Speculation (P - fee-based)
(6/30/2022) Aura Estrada Short Story Contest: Speculation (F)
(6/30/2022) Best Asian Speculative Fiction Anthology Series: Speculative stories set in an Asian country with Asian main characters (F)
(6/30/2022) Kids Are Hell Anthology: Stories of innocent youngsters turned malevolent (F)
(6/30/2022) The Librarian Anthology: The Librarian (F)
(6/30/2022) Fairy Tale Review: The Rainbow Issue: queer fairy tales written by queer writers (NPF)
(6/30/2022) Funny Pearls: Humour by Women: The World of Statistics (NF)
(6/30/2022) Coffin Bell: The Zodiac (NPF)
(6/30/2022) inScribe: Journal of Creative Writing: Time (NPF)
(6/30/2022) The Spoon Knife Anthology Series: Transitions (NPF)
(6/30/2022) Cast of Wonders: Young Authors (19 or younger) (F)
(7/1/2022) The Twin Bill: All-Star Game (NPF)
(7/1/2022) Through Lines Magazine: Belonging (NPF)
(7/1/2022) Eerie River Publishing Folk Horror Series: Folk Horror (F)
(7/1/2022) Updated! Kaleidoscoped Magazine: Ghosts & Gossip (NPF)
(7/1/2022) Still Point Arts Quarterly: Immersed in Books (NPF)
(7/1/2022) Up the Staircase Quarterly: Odes (NP)
(7/1/2022) English Journal: Our Américas (N)
(7/1/2022) Quagmire Fiction Contest: Quagmire (F)
(7/1/2022) Big Bend Literary Magazine: Rain Dance (NPF)
(7/1/2022) Substantially Unlimited: Stigma (NPF)
(7/1/2022) Still of Winter: An Unsettling Reads Anthology: Still of Winter (PF)
(7/1/2022) THEMA: The Crumpled Yellow Paper (NPF)
(7/1/2022) It Came from the Trailer Park Anthology Series: Trailer Park (F)
(7/1/2022) The ALAN Review: Using YAL as a Disruptor (N)
(7/3/2022) Moss Piglet Zine: Funny Pages (NPF)
(7/3/2022) Luna Press Publishing: Haunted Novel (F)
(7/3/2022) Havok: Pride/Humility (F)
(7/3/2022) Liars' League: Women & Girls (F)
(7/4/2022) Pulp Modern: Horror and Weird Fiction only (F)
(7/4/2022) ACU Prize for Poetry: Hope (P - fee-based)
(7/4/2022) HauntedMTL Anthology Series: Horror with a feminine twist (F)
(7/4/2022) Solarpunk Magazine: Solarpunk at Work subs only (NPF)
(7/5/2022) Focus on the Family: Mother's Day (N)
(7/6/2022) Imitation Fruit Literary Journal: Connection (NPF)
(7/6/2022) Moss Piglet Zine: Mishaps and Misadventures (NPF)
(7/9/2022) Southern Cultures: Black Geographies (N)
(7/10/2022) Whiptail: Journal of the Single-line Poem: Personal Transitions (P)
(7/10/2022) swim meet lit mag: Submerge (NPF)
(7/12/2022) Focus on the Family: Resurrection Day (N)
(7/14/2022) Apparition Lit Flash Fiction Challenge: Coreen Simpson (F)
(7/15/2022) Border Arts Beyond Barriers Anthology: Border Arts Beyond Barriers (NPF)
(7/15/2022) Riptide: Breath (F)
(7/15/2022) NEW! Sad Girl Review: Cat Lady (NP)
(7/15/2022) Waco Cultural Arts Wordfest Anthology: Earth (P)
(7/15/2022) The Amphibian Literary Journal: Family/Ancestors (PF)
(7/15/2022) the winnow magazine: Home and/or Liminal Spaces (NPF)
(7/15/2022) Plum Tree Tavern: Homelessness (P)
(7/15/2022) Youth Speaks: Human Rights in Verse Anthology: Human Rights and Social Justice (NPF)
(7/15/2022) Snapdragon: A Journal of Art & Healing: Innovation (NP)
(7/15/2022) Never Cheat a Witch Anthology: Never Cheat a Witch (F)
(7/15/2022) CHEAP POP: Nostalgia (NF)
(7/15/2022) Writing Magazine Competitions: Shelley Poetry Competition (PF - fee-based)
(7/15/2022) Blink-Ink: Storm (F)
(7/15/2022) Updated! Kosmos Journal Quarterly: The Families We Make (NP)
(7/15/2022) Atticus Review: The Internet (NPF - fee-based)
(7/15/2022) Harbor Anthologies: The intersection of queerness and disability (NP)
(7/15/2022) Sasee Magazine: There is no "I" in "Team (N)
(7/15/2022) Ask Magazine: Unmentionables (N)
( (7/20/2022) NEW! Shima Journal: Coastal waterways, cultural heritage and environmental planning (NN)
(7/20/2022) Burrow e-journal: What does mental health (good or otherwise) look like through the prism of place? (P)
(7/24/2022) Green Ink Poetry: Furrows (P): Speculative Fiction/(F)
(7/31/2022) Hedgehog Poetry Press Pamphlet Competitions: A Baker's Dozen (P - fee-based)
(7/31/2022) Defunkt Magazine: Anatomy (NPF)
(7/31/2022) Amsterdam Quarterly: City and/or Country (NPF)
(7/31/2022) The Cellar Door: A Themed Anthology Series: Dark Highways (F)
(7/31/2022) Eastern Iowa Review: Elven Fiction (F)
(7/31/2022) Fiends in the Furrows Folk Horror Anthology Series: Final Harvest (F)
(7/31/2022) Allegro Poetry Magazine: Freedom (P)
(7/31/2022) NEW! Superlative: The Short Story Literary Journal: Futures (N)
(7/31/2022) NEW! Superlative Short Story Competition: Futures (F - fee-based)
(7/31/2022) NEW! Superlative Flash Fiction Competition: Futures (F - fee-based)
(7/31/2022) NEW! Superlative Mini Saga Competition: Futures (F)
(7/31/2022) NEW! Superlative: The Short Story Literary Journal: Futures (F)
(7/31/2022) ShufPoetry: Graphic Poetry (P)
(7/31/2022) Last Leaves Magazine: Growth (P)
(7/31/2022) FIYAH: Magazine of Black Speculative Fiction: Hauntings and Horrors (NPF)
(7/31/2022) NonBinary Review: In Motion (NPF)
(7/31/2022) Jellyfish Review: Little Sayings (NF)
(7/31/2022) Funny Pearls: Humour by Women: Love at Second Sight (NF)
(7/31/2022) Of Rust and Glass Anthology Series: Midwest LGBTQIA Fiction (PF)
(7/31/2022) NEW! Museum Piece Anthology: Museum (F)
(7/31/2022) The A-Z of Horror Anthology Series: P is for Poltergeist (F)
(7/31/2022) Our Pandemic Anthology: Pandemic (N)
(7/31/2022) Brink Literary Journal: Reverence (NPF)
(7/31/2022) Ring of Fire Anthology: Ring of Fire (F)
(7/31/2022) Lucky Jefferson: Sonder (NPF)
(7/31/2022) Datableed: Sonnets (P)
(7/31/2022) Bloodless: An Anthology of Blood-Free Horror: Stories or poems where no blood is mentioned, nor any associated gore, grue & guts (F)
(7/31/2022) Trembling With Fear: Summer Holiday Special (F)
(7/31/2022) The Walter Swan Poetry Prize: The Audience (P - fee-based)
(7/31/2022) NewMyths.com: The Growers (NPF)
(7/31/2022) Fragmented Voices Big Book Anthology: The Ones Who Make the World Better (P)
(7/31/2022) Bound in Flesh: An Anthology of Trans Body Horror: Trans Body Horror (F)
(7/31/2022) The Ilanot Review: Want (NPF)
(7/31/2022) The MockingOwl Roost: Yugen (NPF)
(8/1/2022) The Avenue: A Mid-Atlantic Literary Journal: Anticipation (NPF)
(8/1/2022) The Place Where Everyone's Name is Fear Anthology: Charity anthology to support women's reproductive health (NPF)
(8/1/2022) Halfway Down the Stairs: Cities (NPF)
(8/1/2022) Last Girls Club: Dark Shadows: The Gay 90s (NPF)
(8/1/2022) Saddlebag Dispatches: Dusty Richards (NP)
(8/1/2022) Embers of Corsari Anthology: Embers of Corsari (F)
(8/1/2022) little somethings press: Ephemera (NPF)
(8/1/2022) The First Line: First line: Lily unlocked the back door of the thrift store using a key that didn't belong to her (PF)
(8/1/2022) Grimoire: Goth Narcissus (NPF)
(8/1/2022) Central Texas Writers Society Anthology: Light and Darkness (NPF)
(8/1/2022) Sydney Hammond Memorial Short Story Writing Competition: Water Under the Bridge (F - fee-based)
(8/2/2022) Focus on the Family: Gifts for Dad (N)
(8/5/2022) Updated! Brute: Raunch, Scares, and Rough Trade Anthology: Gay sexuality, desire, masculinity, and the aesthetics of "rough trade" (F)
________________________________________
Open Submissions on Duosuma
There are 63 projects with 104 open calls for submissions on Duosuma, Duotrope's submission manager.
________________________________________
Sponsored Contests
Duotrope is currently sponsoring the following contests:
Tom Howard/Margaret Reid Poetry Contest
Stories That Need To Be Told: The Contest
The Orison Chapbook Prize
________________________________________
Recent Acceptances
Congratulations to the following people, who have reported acceptances since the last newsletter:
Open Submissions on Duosuma
There are 63 projects with 104 open calls for submissions on Duosuma, Duotrope's submission manager.
The Alchemy Spoon
The Alchemy Spoon Issue 7
Apple in the Dark
Fall 2022
Best Spiritual Literature Awards (Orison Books)
Best Spiritual Literature Award - Fiction (Charges fees.) / Best Spiritual Literature Award - Nonfiction (Charges fees.) / Best Spiritual Literature Award - Poetry (Charges fees.)
Bright Flash Literary Review
Flash and Short Fiction, Memoir, Rolling Submissions, No Theme
Bristol Noir
Flash Fiction (Charges fees.) / Poetry (Charges fees.)
CafeLit
Ongoing submissions
Children's Books for ages 7–10 (CafeLit)
Children#s 7–10
Children's Picture Books for writer / illustrator teams (CafeLit)
Children's Picture Books
Children's Picture Books for writers (CafeLit)
Children's Picture Books - writers
The Decadent Review
Aesthetics and Abstraction / Criticism and Reviews / Meta on Meta
Degenerate Art
Poetry / Prose - Fiction / Prose - Non-Fiction
Diet Milk Magazine
FALL/WINTER
The Dirty Spoon Radio Hour & Journal
Season 5 - Full Manuscripts / Season 5 - Pitches
Dismantle Magazine
Fall Issue
Dream of Shadows
Website and Anthology
Dream Pop Journal (Dream Pop Press)
Poetry / Reviews / Speculative Diary / Visual Art (Non-Poetry) / Visual Poetry & Erasure
The Echo
Intersections
Ember Chasm Review
Fiction & Nonfiction - Print and Online Issues (Charges fees.) / Poetry - Print and Online Issues (Charges fees.) / Visual Art (Charges fees.)
Embryo Concepts Zine and Collective
Issue #6: Splendor
Emergent Reader Books for Children (CafeLit)
Emergent reader texs and texts upt to 20,000 words for children
Featured Poets (osamasetorbest.com)
Poetry Submission
Feisty Women - Fiction (CafeLit)
Feisty Women Fiction
Feisty Women Non- Fiction (CafeLit)
Feisty Women Non-Ficition
Flash Fiction Collections (CafeLit)
Flash Fiction Collections Open Call
FlowerSong Press
Manuscript Submissions Now Open
Free Radicals Quarterly (Free Radicals Magazine (Quarterly))
Rolling Submissions for Free Radicals Quarterly
Grand Little Things
Poetry
HauntedMTL - Anthology
Women's Charity Anthology
The Headlight Review
Book Reviews
Hidden Villains Anthology Series (Inkd Publishing)
Hidden Villains: Arise
Horror Reviewers Needed! (HauntedMTL)
Horror Reviewers Needed!
KAIROS Literary Magazine
2022 Chapbook Contest (Charges fees.) / 2022 KAIROS Editors' Prizes in Fiction and Poetry (Charges fees.) / CREATIVE NON-FICTION (Charges fees.) / FLASH FICTION (<1000 words) (Charges fees.) / OPINION/EDITORIAL & CRITICAL ESSAYS (Charges fees.) / POETRY (Charges fees.) / SHORT FICTION (>1000 words) (Charges fees.)
Limit Experience Journal (Limit Experience Media)
Sexual Transitions (Charges fees.) / Travel & Sexuality (Charges fees.)
Litbop: Art and Literature in the Groove
Issue 2 Art/Photography/Cartoons / Issue 2 Poetry / Issue 2 Short Story
MacroMicroCosm (Vraeyda Literary)
Hockey Stick Galaxy Volume 8 Issue III / The Siege Perilous: A Philosopher's Throne / Virgo Volume 8 Issue II
Maximus Magazine (Maximus Books)
Issue 2
The Metaworker Literary Magazine
General Call for The Metaworker / Micro Call for The Metaworker
The New York Quarterly
General Poetry Submission (Charges fees.)
The Orison Chapbook Prize (Orison Books)
Chapbook (Charges fees.)
Our Pandemic (The Writer's Workout)
CNF: experiences and tributes
Pen & Publish
Editorial internship / Marketing internship
Please Welcome to the Stage…: A Drag Literary Anthology (House of Lobsters Literary)
Please Welcome to the Stage…
The Plentitudes
The Plentitudes - Call for Poems: Fall 2022 (Charges fees.) / The Plentitudes - Call for Short Stories & Essays (Charges fees.)
Radix Magazine
Radix Magazine Summer 2022 (Charges fees.)
Red Ogre Review
August 2022 - Poetry & Art / Short Genre Fiction Contest (Charges fees.)
The Red Telephone YA books (CafeLit)
YA Novels / YA Novels 45,000 to 105,000 words
River River Books
2022 Manuscript Open Reading Period
A Sad Girls Club Lit
Sad Girls Club $500 Summer Poetry Contest (Charges fees.)
A Sad Girls Club Literary Blog
$300 Short Story, Fiction, & Non-Fiction Contest (Charges fees.)
San Antonio Review
Art
Single author short story collections (CafeLit)
Single author collections
Slant Books
Manuscript Submission (Charges fees.)
Still of Winter: An Unsettling Reads Anthology (Unsettling Reads, LLC)
Still of Winter: An Unsettling Reads Anthology
Still Point Arts Quarterly (Shanti Arts LLC)
1. Immersed in Books - Writing Submission / 2. Immersed in Books - Art Submission / 3. Cities - Writing Submission / 4. Cities - Art Submission / 5. Minimalist Wisdom - Writing Submission / 6. Minimalist Wisdom - Art Submission / 7. Fires and Floods - Writing Submission / 8. Fires and Floods - Art Submission
Sunspot Lit Rigel Contest: $250 for Fiction, NF, Poetry, Art, Graphic Novel (Sunspot Literary Journal)
Rigel 2022 (Charges fees.)
Tales (The Writer's Workout)
Theme: The Deep
Twelve Winters Journal (Twelve Winters Press)
Twelve Winters Journal (Charges fees.)
Volney Road Review
Issue 5 (Charges fees.)
Vraeyda Literary
Poetry Collection / Sci-Fi/Magic Realism/Fantasy Novels
Willows Wept Review
Poetry / Prose / Visual Art
Word Poppy Press
Issue Four / Word Poppy Blog
The Writers Circle Anthology Series (Prime Press)
Campfire Stories / Theme: Purgatory
Author publisher latest list of markets
25 Magazines Accepting Creative Nonfiction

Blue Earth Review

This literary journal is published by Minnesota State University, Mankato. They accept nonfiction of up to 3,000 words, fiction, and poetry. "We are interested in creative nonfiction (memoir and personal essay) with contemporary themes. No literary criticism. …. We love nonfiction that works on more than just a narrative level. Surprise us with metaphor and layers of meaning." Details here.

Mangoprism

They accept both pitches and submissions - for personal essays, cultural criticism, long-form interviews with interesting people, short fiction; album, book, movie and product reviews; original reporting; radical political screeds; and unexpected recipes. Only, "your piece must be at least as enjoyable as eating a morsel of mango, the most succulent of fruits." Pay is at least $0.10 for work of 1,000–3,000 words. Details here.

Channel Magazine

They publish writing from an environmental perspective - "work that engages with the natural world. We have a particular interest in work which encourages reflection on human interaction with plant and animal life, landscape and the self." Essays (up to 6,000 words) and essay pitches are accepted year-round - including creative nonfiction, reportage, commentary, and criticism. They also publish translations. There are submission periods for fiction and poetry, which are closed now. Pay is €50 per page for prose, up to €150. Details here.

(Also see The Willowherb Review, which publishes nature writing, very broadly interpreted, by writers of color; pay is £250 for prose; deadline 30 June 2022. There's also the UEA/Willowherb Speculative Nature Writing Call for Essay Proposals, a mentorship/publishing opportunity, in collaboration with the University of East Anglia, for three new/emerging writers of colour on nature writing; deadline 15 July 2022.)

Reckoning

They want creative writing, including translations, and art about environmental justice. "the nonfiction is more creative than journalistic … the heart of what we want is your searingly personal, visceral, idiosyncratic understanding of the world and the people in it as it has been, as it is, as it will be, as it could be, as a consequence of humanity's relationship with the earth." See the editors' preferences for Issue 7. Send 3–5 poems, and up to 20,000 words of prose. Pay is $0.08/word for prose and $30/page for poetry. The annual deadline is usually Earth Day (22 September 2022). Details here.

New York Times: Modern Love and Tiny Love Stories
These are nonfiction columns. For both, they especially welcome work from historically underrepresented writers, and from those outside the US.
 - Modern Love: They want "honest personal essays about contemporary relationships.

We seek true stories on finding love, losing love and trying to keep love alive. We welcome essays that explore subjects such as adoption, polyamory, technology, race and friendship - anything that could reasonably fit under the heading "Modern Love." Ideally, essays should spring from some central dilemma you have faced. It is helpful, but not essential, for the situation to reflect what is happening in the world now." Also, "Love may be universal, but individual experiences can differ immensely and be informed by factors including race, socio-economic status, gender, disability status, nationality, sexuality, age, religion and culture." Send essays of 1,500–1,700 words.
The Account

They publish creative nonfiction of up to 6,000 words, as well as fiction and poetry. All work has to be accompanied by an account. "An account of a specific work traces its arc - through texts and world - while giving voice to the artist's approach. … We are most interested in how you are tracking the thought, influences, and choices that make up your aesthetic as it pertains to a specific work." At the time of writing, they were reading for their Fall 2022 issue. Details here and here.

So Textual

Their website says, "So Textual is a community and online platform for bookish individuals who seek a smart conversation about literature, creative practice, and a considered lifestyle. We celebrate books alongside the contemporary reader." Among the topics they're always looking for, are personal essays about a single book or author that changed your life. Also see a recent Twitter thread on the kind of pitches they want - "We're always looking for evergreen essays, lists related to reading culture, city guides, and bookstore pilgrimages. We love: overlooked writers, art making, meaning-making, in media res, epistolary, riposte, plot twists, besotted characters, offline considerations, literary props, mythmaking, associate thinking, fragments, synthesis as mastery, the classics, films for the literary". Rates start at $200 for essays and $75 for lists. Details here (Twitter thread) and here (pitching guidelines).

Brick

This Canadian magazine only accepts literary nonfiction submissions, though they also publish some fiction and poetry. "Love has led Brick to publish essays of every description: on reading, the writing life, literature, art, ideas, travel, science, photography, the perfect ending, dance, sport, music, city-building, food, bathrooms, history . . . and we are always looking for new terrain. We are interested in the singular obsessions that compel you to write. We welcome humour, we welcome depth, we welcome the unclassifiable, and we welcome playfulness with the non-fiction form." Their essays are usually 1,000–5,000 words. Their annual reading periods are September 1 to October 31, and from March 1 to April 30. Pay is CAD55–660. Details here.

…ongoing…

They publish writing and music based on prompts; each month, they will publish a prompt (or two); for music, writers have to respond with a prose piece of 50–1,000 words in any genre, and for written prompts, musicians have to respond with a piece of music. They have two musical prompts now, and invite writers to respond to these. The deadline for this month's prompts is 26 June 2022, and pay is CAD30. Details here and here.

Empty House Press

Their website says, "We are looking for writing that addresses the way narrative and presence adhere to place and the way they vanish. We encourage broad interpretations of what the idea or image of an empty house might evoke. This includes but is not limited to writing about home, landscape, place, memory, and of course, the atmosphere of previously inhabited spaces." Apart from nonfiction (up to 2,000 words), they also publish fiction, poetry, and photo series. Details here.
The Iowa Review
This well-regarded literary magazine, associated with the University of Iowa and published for 50-plus years, publishes nonfiction, fiction, poetry, and translations. There's a fee for online submissions for non-subscribers, but postal submissions are free. For prose, length guidelines are up to 25 pages, and pay is $0.08/word. Their annual reading period is 1 September-1
November. Details here.

Good River Review

This journal is associated with Spalding University in Louisville, Kentucky. They publish two issues a year and feature book reviews, craft essays, and other literary news on their website. The magazine "is a home for writing that launches quickly, speaks to the universal through the particular, and is layered with meaning. We also love work that doesn't fit neatly into genre categories. Our editors are attracted to writing that blurs boundaries, and so contributors will find their work published as prose, lyrics, or drama. In addition, we want to publish the most compelling writing for children and young adults that we can find." Prose writers should submit one story, one longer-form essay, memoir, or immersive journalism (up to 5,000 words), or two shorter pieces. Details here.

Riddle Fence

This is a Canadian magazine of arts and culture. They publish contemporary writing, four times a year. They accept creative nonfiction (up to 3,000 words), features and reviews, poetry, fiction, and contemporary art. "For nonfiction, we're looking for essays on the arts or on particular artists, or on aspects of culture and art as an idea or as a specific practice. We are also seeking creative non-fiction with a strong narrative drive." Details here.

Scrawl Place

Their website says, "Scrawl Place is part visitor's guide, part travelogue, part literary journal. It's meant for readers who prefer Bashō to Lonely Planet." Also, "I'm looking for submissions about "places in the places" where you live or where you've visited.

My only fixed criteria is that your submission be about or connected to or associated with a specific, physical place that someone could visit. … The place you write about could be a Wonder of the World, a random street corner that means something to you, or anything in between." They accept creative nonfiction, fiction, poetry, and hybrid works of up to 900 words. Writers can send up to 3 pieces. Pay is $35. Details here.

Empty Mirror

They publish nonfiction - essays, reviews, articles, features, interviews, personal essays, of up to 20,000 words (see guidelines). They also publish poetry and visual art. They publish work every Friday. Details here.

The Sun Magazine

They publish personal essays, fiction, poetry, and photography. "Personal stories that touch on political and cultural issues are welcome." Pay is $300–2,000 for prose, for print. There's also a themed Readers Write section, which publishes only nonfiction - "Feel free to submit your writing under "Name Withheld" if it allows you to be more honest." They have a few upcoming themes for this section, including Anniversaries, due 1 July; and The Phone, due 1 August 2022. Payment for Readers Write is magazine subscription.
Details here and here.

Molecule - A Tiny Lit Mag
They publish prose - fiction and creative nonfiction, poetry, plays, interviews, reviews, and visual art twice annually. All work should be 50 words or fewer (including titles and interview questions). They also want visual art of tiny
things like tea bags and toothpicks, or tiny paintings. Details here.

Dream Pop Journal

They publish work every Tuesday. They welcome submissions in experimental, non-narrative forms. Apart from poetry, reviews, visual art, and visual poetry & erasure, they publish a Speculative Diary, of up to 2,500 words - "Speculative diary is a subgenre of creative non-fiction that incorporates science fiction, fantasy, and horror elements into diary writing. Diary is anything from "Dear Diary" style writing to journaling, to sketches, vignettes, fragments, scintillae, or notes. What makes diary diary for this call is work that is concerned with chronology and kairology. For this specific call, speculative can include any sort of SF/F/Horror mythos, tropes, or archetypes. Speculative will also encompass the paranormal, supernatural, mythic, dystopian, alternate histories, retrofutures, Afrofuturism, dreampunk, Ethno/Southern Gothic, and hi-tech mystery/thriller. The point is to bring genre fiction ideas and aesthetics into one's processing of the real world and memories." Details here.

Points in Case

They want creative, thematic, and entertaining literary humor. They accept many formats, including essays and lists. Pay is $10–35 for submissions up to 1,000 words. Details here.

Pithead Chapel

They want personal, memoir, lyric, flash (short-shorts), hybrid, and experimental essays, of up to 4,000 words. They also accept fiction and prose poetry. Details here.

Autofocus

Autofocus is a literary publisher of artful autobiographical writing. They have a literary journal, a podcast, and now, a press. For the journal, they want "personal essay, memoir, confessional poetry, curated journal/diary, curated letters/e-mail, hybrid explorations of the self, and any writing that makes art from your life." Prose can be a single piece up to 2,000 words, or two shorter flash pieces. Details here.

(The Submittable page also has details of their craft anthology, 'How to Write a Novel.' "I'm looking for essays about brainstorming and drafting and experimenting and workshopping and revising and all the other different stages and elements of writing a novel… even though they probably won't use those words." Pay for the craft anthology essays is $50, and the deadline is 30 June 2022.)

Creative Nonfiction: True stories by (or about) nurses; and more
Creative Nonfiction regularly issues themed submission calls, and normally, these have a submission fee for non-subscribers. However, for their call on true stories by (or about) nurses, they're not charging a fee, nor for pitches on creative nonfiction as a genre. See all the magazine's calls here. For the nurses call, "We're looking especially for pandemic-era stories, which examine the complex and essential role nurses of all kinds have played in providing care and guidance for patients and families, as well as the ways in which the pandemic has affected both individuals and the healthcare system.
We are looking for writers who can write dramatically and vividly about their work. Essays can be from 1,000 to 4,000 words and should be previously unpublished and written in a narrative form, with scenes, description, vivid characters, and a distinctive voice. … All submissions will be considered for the book and might also be considered for other CNF projects." The deadline for this call is 27 June 2022. Details here.

(They're also always open for pitches on writing about creative nonfiction. "We're looking for writing about writing - smart and insightful ideas related to the art, craft, history, or philosophy of creative nonfiction." They're open to these kinds of stories, see guidelines for examples: then & now stories or timelines; explorations of specific subgenres, considering the work of more than one writer; arguments or research or ideas about why/how true stories matter; craft pieces, particularly related to structure, voice, or finding inspiration; pieces that explore connections between creative nonfiction and other fields/forms; in-depth interviews with prominent voices in the field; or, generally, work that engages deeply in some way with creative nonfiction as a form or practice. For upcoming issues, they are specially interested in pitches on voice in creative nonfiction, and flash nonfiction. These pieces are generally 1,000–3,000 words. Details here.)

Night Shift Radio: The Storyteller Series

Night Shift Radio podcast has The Storyteller Series and they choose two stories to publish each month. One story will be chosen for the Full Cast Audiobook treatment; that author will receive $50 for audio rights and non-exclusive print rights. A second piece will be chosen for their mid-month print only piece. The author of that piece will be offered $25. They publish fiction, nonfiction, memoir - anything that reads with tension and excitement. They have short, week-long submission windows during certain months: for 2022, they'll read submissions during 21st to 28th of August, and of November. Please send submissions only during the reading period. Length guidelines are 7,000–10,000 words. Details here (episodes) and here (guidelines).

Pleiades

They are open for regular submissions until 30 June, of nonfiction, reviews, fiction, and poetry. "…we are particularly interested in creative nonfiction that gazes out at the world rather than into the self. This is to say nothing against memoir, only that our publishing aesthetic leans towards the exterior in order to balance what we often see as a focus on memoir and interiority in many literary journals. Essays that perform a weave of the personal with an outward gaze are very welcome. We do not only consider externally-focused creative nonfiction, but this is our taste preference. Limit creative nonfiction submissions to 6,000 words."
And during 1–31 July 2022, they will open submissions for a special folio, 'Silences of War: Erasure within Conflict'. They want nonfiction, poetry, fiction, and hybrid work "that engages with the untold or silenced side of "war" in all its variations - from global to national to domestic conflict. What and who is erased by violence? What sounds do these silences make, and how can they be honored and represented? How can destruction take the form of creation and utterance? Send us your writing about historical and recent conflicts, forms of resistance and persistence, and the silences upheld by oppressive systems, structures, and individuals. We especially welcome creative work from historically marginalized perspectives." Details here.
(There's also Consequence Forum, which accepts work, including narrative nonfiction, on the consequences of war and geopolitical violence. Pay is $20–200, and the submission period is 15 July-15 October 2022.)
5 Paying Literary Magazines to Submit to in June 2022
These magazines accept fiction, nonfiction, and poetry. They're a mix of literary and genre markets, and not all of them are open through the month.
Extra Teeth

This is a Scottish magazine with an international outlook; they publish fiction and nonfiction. "We look for short stories that stick with you, lingering in the memory long after reading, and essays that explore specific interests or issues from a new perspective. We offer a space for writers to be strange, bold and experimental, and to express their unique style however they see fit." They also commission one guest illustrator per issue, whom they pay £500.
Deadline: 14 June 2022
Length: 800–4,000 words
Pay: £100
Details here.
(And Mud Season Review is open for fiction, nonfiction, and poetry. Pay is $50, and the deadline is 30 June 2022, or until filled, for fee-free submissions.)
The Puritan

This Canadian literary magazine publishes fiction, nonfiction, interviews, reviews, and poetry. They accept a limited number of fee-free submissions every month.
Deadline: 25 June 2022 for Summer issue; reads year-round
Length: Up to 10,000 words for fiction, up to 4 poems; various for nonfiction (see guidelines)
Pay: CAD200 per essay; CAD150 for fiction; CAD100 per interview or review; CAD25 per poem (or page, capped at CAD80)
Details here.
Mythic

This is a quarterly speculative fiction magazine seeking diverse sci-fi and fantasy fiction. They also accept reprints. They read during March, June, September, and December.
Deadline: 30 June 2022
Length: 2,000–5,000 words
Pay: $0.01/word
Details here.
(And Fusion Fragment will open a very short submission window in June. They want "Science fiction or SF-tinged literary fiction stories and novelettes ranging anywhere from 2,000 to 15,000 words. Although any science fiction subgenre is fair game, our tastes lean towards slipstream, cyberpunk, post-apocalypse, and anything with a little taste of the bizarre." Pay is CAD3.5c/word, up to CAD300. Reading period is 10th to 12th June 2022. Details here.)
Palette Poetry

They publish poems from writers at all stages of their careers, and especially encourage emerging poets to submit. Send up to 5 poems. (They're also running a fee-based contest for women poets.)
Deadline: Ongoing
Length: Up to 5 poems
Pay: $50/poem, up to $150
Details here. (scroll down)
Grub Street: Now Accepting Manuscript Queries
An award winning niche publisher. No agent required.
Keep Reading…
More…

The Dread Machine: Now Seeking Submissions
Now seeking short stories. They pay all their authors.
Keep Reading…
The Writing Project That Took a Quarter of a Century to Complete
Just after giving up - this author got an email that changed her life. Here's what happened.
Keep Reading…
Announcing The 2022 Poetry Marathon! Write 24 poems in 24 hours with hundreds of writers from around the world. Learn more here.
Cathy's Comp's also provides a great list of markets
Here they are:
https://compsandcalls.com/wp/2022/06/01/comps-and-calls-for-june-2022/
Cathy x
Erica Dreifus also publishes a good market summary at the Praticing Writer website.
https://email.mg-d1.substack.com/c/eJxVkd1uhCAQhZ9G7tbwo4gXXDRp9jUIwujSVTD8tPHti...

The Practicing Writer 2.0: June 2022
55+ carefully curated calls and competitions for poets, fictionists, & writers of cnf. No fees. Paying opportunities only. Nothing that's limited to residents of a single city/state/province.

Erika Dreifus
May 31
Welcome, new readers, and welcome back to the regulars!
For updates and additional opportunities between newsletters, please check the "Practicing Writing" blog and follow Erika Dreifus on Twitter (@ErikaDreifus) and/or Facebook.
If you are accessing this newsletter via email, you may find a "Message Clipped" warning as you continue reading. That's due to the length of this info-packed missive. Please be sure to click as appropriate to view the complete text.
Please share this newsletter with your networks! If you'd like to share individual listings with others, PLEASE CREDIT THE PRACTICING WRITER (ideally with a link - a working one, I somehow find it necessary to add) back to this newsletter.
Thanks for respecting your editor's volunteer efforts.

IN THIS ISSUE:
1. Editor's Note
2. Success Stories
3. Featured Resource
4. Current Contests, Competitions, and Other Opportunities (NO ENTRY OR APPLICATION FEES; PAYING OPPORTUNITIES ONLY; NOTHING THAT'S LIMITED TO WRITERS IN A SINGLE CITY/STATE/PROVINCE)
5. Submission Alerts (NO SUBMISSION/READING FEES; PAYING CALLS ONLY; NOTHING THAT'S LIMITED TO WRITERS IN A SINGLE CITY/STATE/PROVINCE)
6. Blog Notes
7. Newsletter Matters

1. EDITOR'S NOTE
Welcome, practicing writers:
I wish that May had been a better month.
I wish that we lived in a better, less-wounded world.
I wish that I had healing words to offer here. I don't.
But we are writers. And we work with words.
And if and when you have words to share that relate to recent events, perhaps some of the information in this newsletter will help you share and amplify them.
With hopes for better times,
ERIKA

2. SUCCESS STORIES
From Marsheila (Marcy) Rockwell:
#Writers, you should totally check out @erikadreifus's The Practicing Writer. I've sold at least 3 pieces to markets that probably wouldn't have been on my radar if not for her newsletter. [ED note: Click through for links!]
From Anca Szilágyi:
Thanks to your posting The Fiddlehead's calls for submissions in your newsletter, last year I sent them my essay "Boiled Boot," about my grandmother's childhood starvation during the Shoah and integenerational trauma, and it is now in their spring issue. Since it's in print only, I put a bit about the essay on my blog too. I so appreciate all that you do for the literary community!
From Allison Floyd:
I just had a (paid!) blog post accepted for "The Growlery," Run Amok Books' new blog about writers and writing. I became aware of this opportunity via the May edition of The Practicing Writer. It probably wouldn't have ended up on my radar without your fantastic newsletter. Thank you!
Please share news from your writing practice that may be connected with this newsletter or our other resources. I love to celebrate such successes in this space!

3. FEATURED RESOURCE
In preparation for a couple of recent presentations, I've updated a list titled "Where to Read (And Publish) Writing on Jewish Themes": bit.ly/JewishWriting

As noted in introductory text, this resource is not limited to no-fee/paying publications, so bear that fact in mind.

4. CURRENT CONTESTS, COMPETITIONS, AND OTHER OPPORTUNITIES
• RUTH LILLY AND DOROTHY SARGENT ROSENBERG FELLOWSHIPS
Deadline June 2 (11:59pm Chicago time). Awards $25,800 each "to five young poets through a national competition sponsored by the Poetry Foundation. Established in 1989 by the Indianapolis philanthropist Ruth Lilly and increased in 2013 with a gift from the Dorothy Sargent Rosenberg Memorial Fund, the fellowships are intended to encourage the further study and writing of poetry." Note that applicants "must reside in the U.S. or be U.S. citizens" and "must be at least 21 years of age and no older than 31 years of age as of April 30, 2022."
• LETRAS BORICUAS FELLOWSHIP
Deadline: June 13 (4pm Eastern). Sponsored by The Mellon Foundation and The Flamboyan Foundation's Arts Fund, this program provides 40 writers (20 selected in 2021 and 20 to be selected in 2022) with $25,000 each. "Recipients will also participate in a gathering of all forty Fellows to be hosted in Puerto Rico, tentatively scheduled for April 2023. While fellowship award funds are unrestricted, the hope is to help writers in Puerto Rico and across the diaspora, pursue their writing, amplify their work to a broader audience, and create work that celebrates Puerto Rican life and culture. It is also the aim that each Fellowship cohort will include writers of different genres [poetry, fiction, creative nonfiction, and children's literature] and writers who live in Puerto Rico, as well Puerto Ricans who may live in the United States. Applications will be accepted in Spanish and/or English."
• ANONYMOUS WAS A WOMAN ENVIRONMENTAL ART GRANTS
Deadline: June 14 (5pm Eastern). "This program provides up to $20,000 for projects led by women-identifying artists in the United States and U.S. Territories," supporting "environmental art projects that inspire thought, action, and ethical engagement. Projects should not only point at problems, but aim to engage an environmental issue at some scale." Note that "selected projects must benefit the public in some way, and are required to have a public engagement component by June 30, 2023."
• BARD FICTION PRIZE
Deadline: June 15 (received). For "a promising emerging writer who is an American citizen aged 39 years or younger at the time of application. In addition to a $30,000 cash award, the winner receives an appointment as writer in residence at Bard College for one semester, without the expectation that he or she teach traditional courses. The recipient gives at least one public lecture and meets informally with students." Application must include "three copies of the published book they feel best represents their work."
• JANE BRINKLEY SUMMER FELLOWSHIP
Deadline: June 15. "The Poetry Society of New York is seeking a generous, creative, thoughtful, open-minded, and hardworking young artist for our 2022 Jane Brinkley Fellowship. This fellowship is named after and was founded in memory of our former intern who we tragically lost at the beginning of this year….With this fellowship, we want to grant the opportunity for a college student like Jane to move to New York City for the summer and help produce the New York City Poetry Festival from September 10th-11th….This fellowship will last from July 1st to September 15th. The awardee will receive $5000 for these three months, as well as support from the Poetry Society of New York re: finding housing and acclimating to the New York area."
• CHRISTOPHER HEWITT AWARD
Deadline: June 15. Honoring A&U Magazine's first literary editor, "the award showcases outstanding responses to the AIDS pandemic and the realities of individuals living with or affected by HIV/AIDS in the genres of fiction, poetry, drama, and creative nonfiction." Awards $75 (per category) and publication. Judges: Philip F. Clark (poetry), Raymond Luczak (fiction), Jay Vithalani (creative nonfiction), Bruce Ward (drama).
• #HIPPOCAMP22 CONFERENCE SCHOLARSHIPS
Deadline: June 15. "Hippocampus Magazine is pleased to announce that it's offering an increased number of scholarships to HippoCamp: A Conference for Creative Nonfiction Writers this year, including three donor-supported (two of which are new this year). HippoCamp 2022 is an in-person conference, scheduled for Aug. 12–14 in Lancaster, PA. All conference scholarships cover full registration and entrance into a pre-conference workshop; the Friends and WOC scholarships also include a $200 travel stipend." Funding opportunities include scholarships open to all writers; scholarships open to all and to unpublished writers of color; a scholarship open to all neurodiverse writers; and a scholarship open to all writers of flash creative nonfiction.
• NORTON WRITER'S PRIZE
Deadline: June 15. "Recognizes outstanding original nonfiction by undergraduates. The contest is open to students age 17 and above who are enrolled in an accredited 2- or 4-year college or university during the 2021–2022 academic year. Three cash prizes of $1,000 apiece will be awarded in 2022 for coursework submitted during the academic year," one in each category (first-year student in a 2- or 4-year college or university; student in a 2-year college/university; student in a 4-year college/university). Instructor nomination required.
• EUGENE C. PULLIAM FELLOWSHIP FOR EDITORIAL WRITING
Deadline: June 20. "Awards $75,000 to an outstanding editorial writer or columnist to help broaden his or her journalistic horizons and knowledge of the world. The annual award can be used to cover the cost of study, research and/or travel in any field. The fellowship results in editorials and other writings, including books."
• MOLLY KEANE CREATIVE WRITING AWARD
Deadline: June 22 (noon, Irish time). Competition "for people resident on the island of Ireland" for an unpublished short story. Prize: "€250 cash plus a course of the winners choice in the Molly Keane Writers Retreat, Ardmore in 2023 to the value of €250." NB: "It is highly advisable that entries are not currently submitted elsewhere for consideration."
• DAVE GREBER FREELANCE WRITER AWARDS
Deadline: June 24. Two awards for social justice writing: "The book award is set at $5,000 and the magazine award is set at $2,000. Since the awards can be given before publication and book and magazine publishing timelines can differ, so do the requirements for each award." Limited to writers who are "a continuing resident of Canada and at the date of application lived in Canada for the last twelve months" and "working a minimum of seventy per cent of their work time as a self-employed freelance writer."
• GREAT LAKES COLLEGE ASSOCIATION NEW WRITERS AWARD
Deadline: June 25. "For the 53rd year this group of thirteen independent Midwestern colleges will confer recognition on a volume of writing in each of three literary genres: poetry, fiction, and creative non-fiction. Publishers submit works on behalf of their authors; a defining criterion for this award is that a work must be an author's first–published volume in the genre." The winning writers "receive invitations to visit several GLCA member colleges, where they will read from their works and engage with students and faculty members in a variety of contexts." Authors "receive an honorarium of $500 from each of the colleges they visit. In addition, writers are reimbursed for all travel, lodging, and food costs they might incur in visits to GLCA member colleges." Limited to writers resident in the U.S. and Canada; publishers may submit only one entry per category. This year's competition will consider works "that bear a publication imprint of 2021 or 2022."
• BLUE MOUNTAIN ARTS POETRY CONTEST
Deadline: June 30. Biannual contest awards cash prizes ($350/$200/$100). "In addition, the winning poems will be displayed on our website." Tips: "Poems can be rhyming or non-rhyming, although we find that non-rhyming poetry reads better. We suggest that you write about real emotions and feelings and that you have some special person or occasion in mind as you write."
• ZACHARY DOSS FRIENDS IN LETTERS MEMORIAL FELLOWSHIP
Deadline: June 30. Posted by Ryan Bollenbach/Heavy Feather Review: "In thinking about my relationship with my late friend and fellow writer Zach Doss, I often feel nostalgic about my lunches with him (and our subsequent conversations on the walk home); we would talk about writing, publishing, submissions (when we worked together at Black Warrior Review), campy TV series we were watching at the time, gossip about our MFA, or life in general. It was a significant aspect of our friendship. Though we rarely critiqued each other's work in class, these meals and conversations were important to our relationship as friends and writers. It is with this kind of friendship in mind that I (along with the generous donation of an anonymous donor) am offering a small sum of $50 to four pairs of friend-artists who submit portfolios of work (with a short introduction) intended to be used for the winners to get a meal together, see a movie, get a few drinks together at a conference, etc. The key is being together. In this way, the offering is low stakes - with no expectation of production - yet I also hope to encourage writers to look beyond ideas of individual work and success that most competitions encourage and toward a deliberate investment in their relationship with their creative partner."
• DRUE HEINZ LITERATURE PRIZE
Deadline: June 30. "Eligible submissions include an unpublished manuscript of short stories; two or more novellas (a novella may comprise a maximum of 130 double-spaced typed pages); or a combination of one or more novellas and short stories. Novellas are only accepted as part of a larger collection. Manuscripts may be no fewer than 150 and no more than 300 pages." Open to those writing in English "who have published a book-length collection of fiction or at least three short stories or novellas in magazines or journals of national distribution. Digital-only publication and self-publication do not count toward this requirement." Confers $15,000, publication by the University of Pittsburgh Press, and promotional support.
• BROOKLYN CARIBBEAN LITERARY FESTIVAL (BCLF) SHORT FICTION STORY CONTEST
Deadline: July 1. The 2022 contest "will award US$1750 in cash for each of the two prizes [the BCLF Elizabeth Nunez Caribbean-American Writer's Prize and the BCLF Elizabeth Nunez Award for Writers in the Caribbean] for the best piece of unpublished short fiction." Judges: Katia D. Ulysse and Ifeona Fulani for the Caribbean-American Writer's Prize and Ayesha Gibson-Gill and Tanya Savage-Batson for the Award for Writers in the Caribbean.
• RICHARD MARGOLIS AWARD
Deadline: "Applications are accepted year-round but must be received by July 1 for consideration for the current-year award." For "a promising new journalist or essayist whose nonfiction work combines warmth, humor and wisdom and sheds light on issues of social justice. The award honors the life of Richard J. Margolis (1929–1991), a renowned journalist, essayist and poet who gave eloquent voice to the rural poor, migrant farmworkers, Native Americans, aging adults and others whose voices are seldom heard. He also wrote several books for children." Award combines a one-month residency at Blue Mountain Center and a $10,000 prize.
• MARLBOROUGH LIT FEST LOVE BOOKS COMPETITION
Deadline: July 1. "We want you to tell us why you love your favourite book, poem or play. Your response can be in the form of a piece of text of up to 750 words, or through a video of no more than four minutes. Entrants should explain what they love about their chosen read, highlighting key areas of interest, and why they think others should try it. We are looking for creative, passionate, and engaging responses which celebrate your love of reading." Prizes (£300 for a winner and £100 for a runner-up) will be awarded in each of three age-group categories: "13–16 years, 17–19 years, 20+ years." Open to entrants outside the UK, "but you need a UK bank account to receive your prize money if you win." (Hat tip: Sian Meades-Williams's Freelance Writing Jobs newsletter.)
• KINGSLEY AND KATE TUFTS POETRY AWARDS
Deadline: July 1. Based at Claremont Graduate University and given for poetry volumes published in the preceding year, these prizes confer $100,000 (Kingsley Tufts Poetry Award) and $10,000 (Kate Tufts Discovery Award). The current cycle will recognize works published between July 1, 2021, and June 30, 2022; the Kingsley Tufts award is for a mid-career poet while the Kate Tufts Discovery Award is for "a first book"; the Kingsley Tufts award also requires the winner to spend, within six months of the award presentation, "one week in residence at Claremont Graduate University for lectures, workshops, and poetry readings in Claremont and Greater Los Angeles." NB: Self-published books are eligible. Note also: "Work must be original poetry written originally in English by a poet who is a citizen or legal resident alien of the United States."
• POETRY COALITION FELLOWSHIPS
Deadline: July 3. "The Poetry Coalition, a network of 25+ poetry organizations coordinated by the Academy of American Poets, is pleased to announce the 2022–2023 Poetry Coalition Fellowships, which are paid fellowship positions for five individuals who will each assist a different Poetry Coalition organization for twenty hours per week over the course of a forty-week period. The fellows will also receive professional development opportunities. The five organizations hosting Poetry Coalition Fellows this year are Letras Latinas, Mass Poetry, Urban Word, Woodland Pattern, and Youth Speaks….The positions will begin on September 5, 2022 and end on June 30, 2023. Interested individuals that are 21 or older are encouraged to apply, including those who are enrolled in or have recently graduated from an MFA program in creative writing."
REMINDER: Some opportunities listed in last month's newsletter remain open.

5. SUBMISSION ALERTS
• From quarterly zine STANCHION: "Three separate submission windows for Issue 8 will open in early June." No theme. Pays: "$10, one complimentary copy of that issue of Stanchion, and a discount code to order extra copies." Windows: June 1–3 for poetry; June 5–7 for "non-poetry": June 9–11 for visual art.
• Opening June 1 (and remaining open for the rest of the month): BATH MAGG, "a magazine of new poetry," for its summer issue. No simultaneous submissions. Payment: £20.
• "CUTLEAF will be opening to fiction submissions on June 1. We're limiting the call to 100 submissions for this reading period, so if you have a piece yo''d like to submit, get it ready!" From the guidelines: "Cutleaf is interested in fiction of all shapes and sizes, although we are generally interested in work less than 6,000 words. Longer work must be exceptionally compelling, and we may publish longer works in installments. Short excerpts from longer works are more likely to be accepted when they stand alone as a discrete work. We will read one long piece or up to three short pieces at a time per author. We are also interested in flash fiction with a limit of 1,000 words. Cutleaf will pay from $100 to $400 for published fiction."
• THE MCNEESE REVIEW will open June 1 (and will remain so until August 31) "for submissions of poetry, fiction, and nonfiction for our 2023 print issue." Payment: "All print contributors receive one contributor copy. We are pleased to also offer a $50 honorarium to print contributors within the U.S. Contributors outside of the U.S. will receive two additional author copies in lieu of the honorarium."
• Vermont-based international journal MUD SEASON REVIEW will be open during the month of June, though "we may close the reading period early by genre if volume demands." They're seeking "deeply human work that will teach us something about life, but also about the craft of writing or visual art, and work that is original in its approach and that in some way moves us." Payment: "$50 for work that appears in our issues. For artists whose images are paired with writing, and for poets whose work appears in The Take: Mud Season Review, we offer payment of $15." (Hat tip here goes to the markets newsletter from WOW! Women on Writing.)
• TACO BELL QUARTERLY has announced: "TBQ6 will be open June 1st to September 5th for a winter issue. Will pay $100."
• Also opening June 1, Ontario-based THE /TEMZ/ REVIEW. They pay $20 (presumably CAD) for poetry and prose.
• I've been alerted that in honor of Juneteenth, THE MAINE REVIEW will run a fee-free submissions window from June 13 to June 19. (Another no-fee window, honoring Pride Month, will run from June 27 to July 3.) They publish "contemporary fiction, nonfiction, and poetry, including works in translation and hybrid forms." Pay rates: "Fiction and Nonfiction writers receive a $25 honorarium per published flash (1,000 words or fewer) and a $50 honorarium for work 1,001 words or more. Poets receive a $25 honorarium per published poem."
• Until June 15, BELL PRESS welcomes submissions for several projects, including two anthologies (one on "Rituals" and the other on "Framework of the Human Body"), paying royalties and "an advance of $15 Canadian prior to publication." They're also receiving submissions for a 2023 Poetry Day Planner, for which payment is "a flat amount of $15 Canadian."
• CHANNEL, an Ireland-based litmag "born out of the climate crisis, publishing poetry and prose with an environmentalist perspective," will close for submissions of fiction and poetry on June 15. (According to their guidelines, "essay submissions, which will be considered for online publication as well as for our next print issue, are open year-round.") Payment: "€50 per poem and €50 per page of prose up to a total maximum fee of €150. Contributors will also receive a copy of whichever issue their work appears within."
• Another one closing June 15: GRAIN, "an internationally acclaimed literary journal that publishes engaging, surprising, eclectic, and challenging writing and art by Canadian and international writers and artists." Send poetry, fiction, or literary nonfiction (query for other genres). Pays: "All contributors, regardless of genre, are paid $50 per page to a maximum of $250, plus two copies of the issue in which their work appears" (the payment is presumably in Canadian dollars). NB: They do have a Submittable cap.
• Also closing June 15: KALEIDOSCOPED, "a new literary magazine formed by MFA students at UC San Diego," which is currently seeking submissions on the theme of "Ghosts and Gossip." Pays: $20. (Hat tip: @Duotrope.)
• FOYER, a UK-based "independent magazine celebrating and exploring untold stories from people of mixed, third culture and second-generation cultural heritage," welcomes pitches and submissions for its first issue, on the theme of "Connect," until June 17. Pays: £75.
• THE PURITAN seeks submissions "all year round, from anywhere in the world," but work received by June 25 will be considered for the summer issue. NB: "Please note that we can only issue payments using PayPal or a cheque in the mail. We also pay in CAD." Pay rates range from $25-$200. "Please note that we can only issue payments using PayPal, Canadian bank e-transfer, or a cheque in the mail. We also pay in CAD. We can pay using Western Union [except to Nigeria] if no other option is available."
• Until June 27, CREATIVE NONFICTION/IN FACT BOOKS seeks "essays by and about nurses for an expanded anniversary edition of I Wasn't Strong Like This When I Started Out: True Stories of Becoming a Nurse. "We're looking especially for pandemic-era stories, which examine the complex and essential role nurses of all kinds have played in providing care and guidance for patients and families, as well as the ways in which the pandemic has affected both individuals and the healthcare system." Payment is unspecified, but "this is a paying market. All submissions will be considered for the book and might also be considered for other CNF projects."
• Attention, Canadians! CLOUD LAKE LITERARY seeks submissions. "We currently publish fiction, creative nonfiction, poetry, and children's literature (ages up to and including YA)." Receives submissions year-round, but work received by June 30 will be considered for the fall issue. Payment: $50 CAD per page to a maximum of $150 CAD.
• The Rainbow Issue of FAIRY TALE REVIEW "will be dedicated to queer fairy tales written by queer writers" and will remain open for submissions until June 30. "While The Rainbow Issue will be dedicated to queer fairy-tale poetry and prose written by writers who self-identify as members of the LGBTQIA+ community, we are especially interested in submissions by writers working at the intersection of queerness, including women and nonbinary writers, BIPOC, writers with disabilities, and writers from other marginalized and underrepresented groups in mainstream publishing." Pays: "Contributors will receive two (2) issues of The Rainbow Issue and a $50 honorarium upon publication."
• FREEZE FRAME FICTION also remains open for submissions until June 30. Submissions should be "1000 words or less, any genre, no content restrictions. We want your science fiction, fantasy, horror, mystery, drama, literary works, satire, bizarre fiction, or anything else you can come up with or mix together. The more original, the better. The weirder, the better." Pays: "$10 per accepted piece."
• June 30 is the deadline for pamphlet submissions at NEON BOOKS: "Neon Books publishes a selection of paper broadsides and pamphlets, which are sent out for free with print orders….We're looking for short works, such as individual poems, small sets of very short poems, or short pieces of fiction. Hybrid works, comics and illustrated pieces are also very welcome….We really enjoy pieces that can be presented in an interesting or unusual way. If you can think of an interesting way of presenting your work, please do include a note describing this in your cover letter. There's no need to format your work ready for printing." Will consider reprints. Payment: "a one-off fee of £25 on acceptance."
• June 30 is also the deadline for submissions for NEW GOTHIC REVIEW, which seeks "previously unpublished short stories that reimagine Gothic fiction for the 21st century." Pays: "a flat $65 for stories (paid within 30 days of acceptance)."
• THREADCOUNT, too, remains open until June 30. This publication "accepts original and previously unpublished works of prose, poetry, fiction, nonfiction, and hybrid text, but we prefer writing that resists such classifications. Primarily we focus on hybrid works between prose poetry and flash fiction." Pays: $25. (Thanks to FlashFictionFlash for introducing me to this one.)
• THE WILLOWHERB REVIEW, which "aims to provide a digital platform to celebrate and bolster nature writing by emerging and established writers of colour," is open for submissions until June 30 ("23.59[BST]"). "We're looking for previously unpublished prose - non-fiction especially, but we will consider fiction and poetry - on nature, place, and environment." Pays: "£250 for prose, £100 for poetry."
• Closing to poetry submissions July 1: Canada-based MINOLA REVIEW, which welcomes work "from all those who identify as women and non-binary writers." Pays: $25 per published poem presumably in Canadian dollars). Note also that they're open to book review pitches and, beginning with their September issue, will pay $20 per published 250–500 word review. (Thanks to WOW! Women on Writing's Markets Newsletter for the reminder about this one.)
• SUBSTANTIALLY UNLIMITED, which "welcomes submissions from anyone who considers themselves disabled, or substantially limited, socially, emotionally, cognitively, or mentally," remains open for submissions on the theme of "stigma" until July 1. Pays: "$15 per published piece via Venmo or Paypal." (Hat tip: @Duotrope.)
• Australia-based podcast PILLOW TALKING "is always looking for first person, narrative/creative nonfiction stories of real-life bedroom conversations. In fact, this podcast wouldn't exist without people choosing to share their intimate conversations. Whether they are thought-provoking, funny, heart-breaking or silly this takes trust, vulnerability and some guts, and I consider receiving each story a huge privilege and responsibility. You can submit from wherever in the world you happen to be." Upcoming themes include "Blue" (with a June 4 deadline); "Suddenly Strangers" (June 18); and "Sanctuary" (July 2). Payment: "$25AUD, paid via PayPal or Stripe, within 1 week of the episode going to air."
• From new journal BROKEN GLASS: "Do you write poetry? Tell stories? Conduct interesting interviews? If so, send us your work. We are starting a new digital magazine and want to hear from you! We focus on moments that embody change that help readers experience perspective-altering inspiration, with an emphasis on show over tell. Art, video, fiction, non-fiction, interviews, investigative reporting, fashion, design, book reviews and more - if it fits our focus, we'd love to see your work. Submissions are free, and we offer honoraria of $50–200 for each piece selected to be published." No deadline explicitly stated, but "submissions will be reviewed starting July 1."
• It may seem that lots of journals close for subs during the northern hemisphere's summer, and, yes - many do! But some remain open year-round. CRAFT is one. Pays: "$100 for original flash and $200 for original short fiction and creative nonfiction." They also publish "essays on writing craft, critical literary analyses, book annotations/reviews, and interviews….All work in this section is concerned with fiction or creative nonfiction. Please do not send critical work about poetry, film, or any other genres….We pay $50 for craft and critical essays, and we pay $50 for most standard interviews and $100 for hybrid interviews (a critical essay paired with a Q&A)."
• Similarly, FRACTURED LIT "is open year-round and is available to all writers. We currently feature two separate submission categories, based on the length of the work submitted: Micro Fiction, for work under 400 words; and Flash Fiction, for work 401–1,000 words." Pays: "$50 for original micro fiction and $75 for original flash fiction."
• Reminder from THE MASTERS REVIEW: "Our New Voices category is open year round to any new or emerging author who has not published a work of fiction or narrative nonfiction of novel length with a wide distribution. Authors with short story collections are free to submit, as are writers with books published by indie presses." Pays: "We pay New Voices authors $200 for short fiction and narrative non-fiction, and $100 for flash-length narratives (up to 1,000 words)."
• Likewise, at FRONTIER POETRY "submissions for our New Voices poetry category are open year round to any new and emerging poet who has not published more than one full-length collection of poetry. New Voices are published online only and will feature a number of poems from new authors each month." Payment: "$50 per poem, up to $150."
• THE SUN welcomes submissions of personal essays, fiction, and poetry. "Personal stories that touch on political and cultural issues are welcome." Pay rates: $300-$2,000 for essays and fiction; $100-$250 for poetry.
• Another one that's open year-round: THE WEST REVIEW, "a literary journal founded on the West Coast that seeks to promote and publish quality literature from our local, national, and international communities, which pays $10/poem and prose piece (via Paypal). NB: "We are primarily a poetry journal & only very rarely publish fiction. Prior to submitting, please read the prose included in prior issues to see if your work would be a good match."
• ORCA, which "publishes short stories and flash fiction, and a limited amount of nonfiction," offers space for 100 free submissions each month. "If the fee-free submission forms do not appear, it means the 100 free submissions have been used for that month, and the free portals will reopen at the start of the next month." They publish three issues each year: "two literary issues and one literary-speculative." Payment: "$50 for published short stories and $25 for flash fiction." (Thanks to Nancy Ludmerer for alerting me to the fee-free submissions policy.)
• From CREATIVE NONFICTION: "We're looking for writing about writing - smart and insightful ideas related to the art, craft, history, or philosophy of creative nonfiction." Check the guidelines for details on what they're looking for (and what they're not looking for), and note that they seem especially interested right now in pitches addressing "voice in creative nonfiction" and flash nonfiction. "This is a paying market," but pay rates aren't specified; no deadline is specified, either.
• Reminder: SHORT STORY, which aims to "revive the art of the short story, support artists, and produce something wonderful," selects one story for publication each month and considers reprints. Pays: "base pay of $100 for the chosen story + 50% of subscription revenue to be sent by Paypal, Zelle, or check."
• And another reminder: Make it a habit to check the CHICKEN SOUP FOR THE SOUL website, where titles in development are posted. "If this is your first time, please visit our Story Guidelines page." Pays: $200 plus 10 free copies.
REMEMBER: Some venues listed in last month's newsletter remain open for submissions.

6. BLOG NOTES
The newsletter is published just once each month, but there's always something new on the Practicing Writing blog:
• (Monday) Markets and Jobs for Writers (including opportunities that don't make it into the monthly newsletter)
• Midweek Notes from a Practicing Writer
• (Friday) Finds for Writers
• Sunday Sentence
Please visit, comment, and subscribe!
Interested in matters of specifically Jewish literary and cultural interest? Please also visit the My Machberet blog ("machberet" is the Hebrew word for "notebook").

7. NEWSLETTER MATTERS
Information contained in The Practicing Writer is researched carefully but readers should always verify information. The Practicing Writer and its editor disclaim any liability for the use of information contained within. Thank you for following/reading.
We value our subscribers, and we protect their privacy. We keep our subscriber list confidential.
About the editor: Erika Dreifus is a writer, teacher, and literary consultant whose books include Birthright: Poems and Quiet Americans: Stories. A Fellow in the Sami Rohr Jewish Literary Institute and an adjunct associate professor at Baruch College/CUNY, she lives in New York. Please visit ErikaDreifus.com to learn more about her work and follow her on Facebook and/or Twitter, where she tweets "on matters bookish and/or Jewish."
If you liked this post from The Practicing Writer 2.0: A Newsletter from Erika Dreifus, why not share it?
Funds for Writers's Latest List
Message from Hope
Book Riot, a daily newsletter of sorts, recently put out a piece about DIY reading retreats. Not writing retreats, mind you, but getaways where you read to your heart's content.
I swear, I drooled over that article. Then I started taking notes. Then I decided somewhere I'm writing an article on this . . . but of course, I might have to practice doing my DIY reading retreat and write from personal experience first.
I want to do that so badly, and while I've spoken of writing retreats, for the life of me I do not understand why I've never contemplated one to purely read. I started listing what to do:
1) designate the time/days
2) pick a place, whether your back porch, spare bedroom, or a trip elsewhere
3) pick the clothes, socks, and cozy-factor
4) pick the books, with a variety
5) pick the snacks, drinks, and meals
6) restrict the social media and phone usage (i.e., set the times you use them)
7) pack a special notebook and a very special pen or two
8) pick the seat, blanket, pillow, chair, etc.
9) isolate and bring it all, or have things brought to you, like in a B&B
Give yourself time frames or an agenda . . . or go rogue with no time constraints.
To a lot of us writer-types, seclusion is pure heaven, being sequestered in the place of your dreams just reading stories. We're always squeezing in our reading and writing time. Imagine being untethered by obligations or writing deadlines. Just you and the words in your hand.
C. Hope Clark
Editor, FundsforWriters
Email Hope | Visit Website | Sign up for Newsletter
Newsletter: ISSN: 1533–1326
FFW has proudly been on the Writer's Digest's 101 Best Websites for Writers list every year since 2001
Our subscriber list is NOT made available to others. Use information listed at your own risk. FundsforWriters gives no warranty to completeness, accuracy, or fitness of the markets, contests, and grants although research is done to the best of our ability.
TWITTER - http://twitter.com/hopeclark
AUTHOR SITE - http://www.chopeclark.com
FACEBOOK - http://www.facebook.com/chopeclark
GOODREADS - http://www.goodreads.com/hopeclark
BOOKBUB - https://www.bookbub.com/authors/c-hope-clark
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Jane Friedman publishes Electric Speed which has lots of market and writing resources.
A note from Jane
Recently I was speaking on a panel about email newsletters when I realized I was a significant outlier compared to my fellow panelists. I don't send as frequently as most, I don't study my metrics, and I don't follow best practices on email length or subscriber retention.
Could I be doing better if I modified my practices? Maybe. Probably. (OK, certainly.)
But what's more important to me is sustainability. I'm only willing to do what I can reasonably sustain for years. I alone am responsible for staving off my own burnout. If I get tired of doing my work, there is no one else to step in. (For the most part. I have my husband, Mark, to thank for freeing up my time to focus on writing and teaching. But he can't write or teach for me if I grow tired of it.)
Recently, I saw this tweet from Ben Orenstein: "I got asked for some advice about starting a podcast. My #1 tip: there's a 95% chance you'll quit within a year, so spend ~all your effort avoiding that outcome. Everything else rounds to unimportant."
What does that mean?
You can ignore best practices. You can ignore all the things you "must" do. Instead, set up your own parameters that make it likely you will stick with your new activity.
Later on, when you have better footing - and valuable experience in the trenches - you can decide how to level up your game and what additional effort might be worthwhile.
But don't make the game so hard to continue that you stop before you've even really started. "Bias for survival," as Orsentein said.
Jane
P.S. The most popular blog post at my site this month:
Why Agents Don't Give Feedback - And Where to Get It Instead
P.P.S. There is more to this newsletter. Keep scrolling!
ISSUE SPONSOR
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At our distinguished low-residency creative writing MFA, you'll thrive in a flexible, encouraging environment while you receive more faculty feedback than in less rigorous programs. Stay in the historic Brown Hotel near campus or study abroad. Affordable tuition; financial aid. www.Spalding.edu/mfa
Learn more at a virtual open house June 26.
Sponsorships help support Electric Speed.
Jane's Electric Speed List
Here are some of the latest things I've discovered. (I am not paid to mention any of these resources; there are no affiliate links.)
Accidentally write a whole paragraph in ALL CAPS?
Yep, it happens to the best of us. And then you have to retype the whole thing. Unless you have Convertcase. Quickly and easily fix your shouting.
Search for specific phrases in movies
This is pretty magical: Type in a phrase of any kind, and PlayPhrase will play movie scenes featuring that phrase. I tried "Stop bothering me." (I admit my cat, Zelda, was interfering with my keystrokes as I typed this one.) You're limited to five searches for free.
A face search engine that's a bit creepy
I found out about PimEyes from a New York Times article. Basically it's a Google image search for faces. The results are insanely accurate and far reaching, at least when I ran a search on myself.
Quickly turn web content into an ebook
EpubPress is a browser-based tool that gathers up whatever online content you specify, and creates an EPUB (ebook) file out of it. You can then load up your EPUB onto your preferred reading device. I hope it goes without saying, but this tool is for personal use only; do not violate anyone's copyright by publishing and/or distributing the resulting file. H/t Dense Discovery
NEXT ONLINE CLASS
June 29: Query Letter Master Class with Jane Friedman
The query letter has one purpose, and one purpose only: to seduce the agent or editor into reading or requesting your work. Learn the best practices of query writing (in any genre) and submit your work with confidence.
Your turn: search engine hacks
In the last issue, I asked you to tell me about your favorite search engine hacks. Here's what you said:
• Search bangs at DuckDuckGo. It's a shortcut to a site. For instance, if I want to search Wikipedia, I type !wiki Tom Cruise into the search bar and I'll end up at Tom's Wikipedia page. There are thousands of search bangs out there, such as !a for Amazon and !gm for Google Maps. See them all. - Bob Mueller
• I think we get too complacent with Google and forget that it often doesn't immediately provide us the things we really need or want. I've grown to like WebCrawler. It is the oldest search engine that still exists today. Another good one is Dogpile. It aggregates results from the search engines Google, Yahoo, and Yandex. - Cindy Bahl
Next question: Any TikTok users here? Tell me about one of your favorite accounts. Hit reply to this message to let me know, or share on the Discord server for Electric Speed subscribers.
Free resources featuring Jane
• July 12: Niche marketing versus general marketing
• Aug. 9: The role of author websites in the social media era
Upcoming online classes
• June 29: Query Letter Master Class with Jane Friedman
• July 8: Build a Business Model for Your Writing Career with Jane Friedman
• July 13: Analyze Story Like an Editor with Tiffany Yates Martin
• July 21: Build a Powerful Email Newsletter with Jane Friedman
• Aug. 11: Today's Key Book Publishing Paths with Jane Friedman
• Sep. 22: Blogging Strategies That Work in 2022 with Jane Friedman
More than 20,000 people read Electric Speed
Subscribe here | Browse archive | Sponsor an issue
"At electric speed, all forms are pushed to the limits of their potential."
 - Marshall McLuhan
WHQ out of the UK is also a great resource with lots of free classes and contests.
Well hello there Jake
It's Monday, and that means it's time to make a plan for the writing week ahead.
Luckily for you, your WHQ membership gives you access to a whole load of FREE courses, resources and assorted sauces to help you get that story of yours written, edited, and sent out into the world. Yes, we're sliding into your inbox this morning to remind you how GREAT it is to be a WHQ member. Sorrynotsorry.
New round these parts and not sure where to begin? Or maybe you're a seasoned member who needs a little kick up the backside to get going. Either way, get stuck into one of these FREE courses:
• Trying to nail that novel plot? Make a start with your outline using the literary magic of Write a Tiny Novel >>
• Already got a first draft and in need of some help to redraft and betterise your words? (Yes that's a real word, shh, we're writers.) Head on over to Editing 101 >>
• Or maybe flash fiction is more your thing. If so, try this bad boy out for size: Five Days of Flash >>
• And hey, maybe you just want a lil' hand holding to get you over that writing slump and inject some OOMPH into your creative practice again. Let us help you out with The Writers' HQ Guide to Productivity >>
And of course there's the usual host of weekly events to help you stop fucking about and start writing, which are handily listed just down there… 👇 👇 👇
Nate Hoffder publishes a weekly market survey newsletter.
Here are a few stories to read this Monday morning.
• Does Scrabble (or rather, its point system) need to be fixed?
• The UK Society of Authors has come out against hybrid publishers. My position is that authors should understand that they are effectively hiring the hybrid publisher to do work for them, and act accordingly.
• Publishing Contracts 101.
• The Onyx BOOX Poke4 Lite runs Android 11 and costs $150.
• There's a Kickstarter campaign in the UK which wants to print books with Dyslexia-friendly fonts. Given that there is no single font which works for all dyslexics, I think ebooks are the better option.
• Irish libraries are plagued by a whole host of problems related to ebooks - most of which are the fault of publishers.
P.S. If I might have a moment of your time for market research, I was thinking of getting these designs printed as door hangers. Would you buy one? Which one?
Writers Digest has almost daily good articles. They also have a weekly poetry prompt, and two month long poetry challenges in November and April
BUILD MY PLATFORM
Writing Mistakes Writers Make: Not Having an Online Presence
The Writer's Digest team has witnessed many writing mistakes over the years, so we started this series to help identify them for other writers (along with correction strategies). This week's writing mistake is not having an online presence.
BY MORIAH RICHARDJUN 24, 2022
Poetry Superhighway's latest Market newsletter
• Sponsor the 2022 Poetry Super Highway Poetry Contest!
Over 140 prizes have been offered by 50 sponsors so far! We're looking for prize donations for our 25th annual summer poetry contest. If you'd like to donate, books, subscriptions, services, or anything of specific interest to Poets and Writers in exchange for a promotional mention in our classified section and all contest correspondence for the duration of the contest, please CLICK HERE for all the details. (The contest will begin in mid-July and sponsors are eligible to enter.)
________________________________________
• This week features poets from Fort Lauderdale, Florida, and Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.
• 6 New poetry and writing website links were added this week.
• Flame at Door and Raisin and Other Stories by Alex Frankel featured this week in the PSH Bookstore.
• PSH LIVE - June Open Reading archived. Next Show: Conversation with 2022 PSH Poetry Contest Judges, Sunday, July 31 at 2 pm (pacific)
________________________________________POETS OF THE WEEK
This week's featured poets are Elisa Albo and Colin James Croal Jackson:
Elisa Albo (Fort Lauderdale, Florida) was born in Havana. A contributing editor of Grabbed: Poets and Writers on Sexual Harassment, Empowerment, and Healing, her poetry chapbooks are Passage to America, based on her family immigrant story, and Each Day More, a collection of elegies. Her poems have appeared in journals and anthologies such as Alimentum, Bomb Magazine, Crab Orchard Review, InterLitQ, MiPoesias, Notre Dame Review, SWWIM Every Day, and Two-Countries: U.S. Daughters and Sons of Immigrant Parents, Irrepressible Appetites, and Vinegar and Char. Nominated in 2021 for Best of the Net, she is an award-winning professor of English and ESL at Broward College, where she co-produces the Seahawk Writing Conference and teaches a food and film course.
James Croal Jackson (Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania) is a Filipino-American poet who works in film production. He has three chapbooks: Count Seeds With Me (Ethel Zine & Micro-Press, 2022), Our Past Leaves (Kelsay Books, 2021), and The Frayed Edge of Memory (Writing Knights, 2017). He edits The Mantle Poetry.
Read their poetry HERE.
________________________________________NEW POETRY AND WRITING WEBSITE LINKS
Here are all of the new sites added to the Poetry Super Highway's Poetry and Writing links sections:
Find thousands more links to poetry and writing websites in our online Link Directory. Click HERE to add your poetry/writing website to our directory.
New Online Poetry Resources:
Line Rider Press
Line Rider Press is a working-class poetry website and book publisher that seeks to showcase class-conscious, counter-cultural, and human-centered poetry and viewpoints. We feature a new poem on our homepage every week, publish artwork, reviews/essays, interviews with poets, and release poetry books annually.
New Online Publications:
Beacon Press
Beacon Press is an independent publisher of serious non-fiction, poetry and more.
New Online Publications:
International Literary Quarterly, the
The mission of The International Literary Quarterly is to provide a forum for outstanding writers, personally invited by the review, and among the most gifted of their generation.
Awakened Voices Magazine
Awakenings is dedicated to making visible the artistic expression of survivors of sexual violence.
Subnivean
Subnivean never flees from chilling poems, penetrating stories, and words that whip our perspectives around. Housed at the State University of New York at Oswego, where 4x more snow falls on our city than Manhattan, we've learned to persist. When winter comes, we reject migration. We use the cold itself as insulation.
New Individual Poets Pages:
Penofthepeople
It is the website for Jennifer Nuesi's book titled THINGS. It is a journey through heartbreak, depression and loss while dealing with the cruelty that anxiety brings.
Grabbed
An anthology of poets and writers on sexual assault, empowerment, and healing.
Publishing and other Forms of Insanity June market list
106 Calls for Submissions in June 2022 - Paying markets

This June there are more than seven dozen calls for submissions. All of these are paying markets, and none charge submission fees. As always, every genre, style, and form is wanted, from short stories to poetry to essays.
I post calls for submissions a few days prior to the first day of every month. But as I am collecting them, I post them on my page, Calls for Submissions. You can get a jump on next month's calls for submissions by checking that page periodically throughout the month. (I only post paying markets.)
Also see Paying Markets for hundreds of paying markets arranged by form and genre.
Happy submitting!
(Image: Pixabay)
______________________
Vastarien. Genre: Horror. Fiction, nonfiction, poetry, art. Payment: 5 cents/word for prose; $50 for poetry and art. Deadline: Opens June 1. Submissions close when they reach their cap of 300.
Cutleaf. Genre: Fiction of all shapes and sizes. Length: Less than 6,000 words. Payment: $100 to $400. Deadline: Opens June 1. (Will close after first 100 submissions)
Stanchion. Genre: Short stories (3000-ish word max), flash fiction, creative nonfiction, poetry, prose poems, stray thoughts, short screenplays, monologues, experimental work, interviews with inanimate objects, comics, black & white photography (vertical, portrait-oriented images are preferred), black & white drawings, black & white collage art, and other evocative images of mixed media artwork (also, you guessed it, in black and white). Payment: $10. Deadline: POETRY WINDOW (June 1–3) NON-POETRY WINDOW (June 5–7) VISUAL ART WINDOW (June 9–11)
Bethlehem Writers Roundtable. Genre: Short stories and poetry. See themes. Payment: 20.00 USD for featured authors, or $10.00 USD for stories published on their &More page and $5.00 USD for poems. Deadline: June 1, 2022.
Contrary. Genre: Poetry, fiction, CNF. Payment: $20. Deadline: June 1, 2022.
Totally Entwined: Secret Santa. Genre: Novellas, 30,000–50,000 words. Theme: Christmas Secrets. LGBTQ focus. Payment: Royalties. Deadline: June 1, 2022.
The Growlery. Genre: Essays in the 500–1000 word range. Topics: What The Hell Am I Thinking: Writers On Why They Write. Greatest Misses: Writers On Failure. Killer Reviews. Writers love and fear reader reviews at the same time, which is what makes them an interesting topic to explore. Payment: Contributors will receive 3–5 cents per word. Deadline: June 1, 2022.
Fieldnotes is a biannual print journal publishing new writing and artworks with a focus on practices that work between disciplines and against type. Genre: "We are seeking non-conforming submissions: ideas in transition, poetry in translation, collaborations and conversations, works between genres, between fiction and theory, between text and image, new poetic modes and things-in-progress." Payment: £100-£200. Deadline: June 1, 2022.
Consequence Forum. Genre: Flash nonfiction focused on the human consequences and realities of war and geopolitical violence. Length: 500–900 words. Payment: $25. Deadline: June 1, 2022.
Scorched Earth Press: Cars Against Humanity! Genre: Nonfiction pieces whose goal is to illuminate the many ways in which cars, and the infrastructure built to support them, constrict (human) life. "We want the essays in this volume to help readers understand the deadly automotive ecologies that have emerged around the world over the past century." Payment: $50. Deadline: June 1, 2022.
Olit. Restrictions: Strong preference for Orlando based writers/submissions about Orlando and surrounding areas. Genre: Fiction, Nonfiction, Poetry, Hybrid, Artwork, Photography. "Send us all kinds of stuff. We love the artfully weird." Payment: $10. Deadline: June 1, 2022.
Parabola. Genre: Original essays and translations, poetry, reviews. Payment: Not specified. Deadline: June 1, 2022. See themes.
Eternal Haunted Summer. Genre: Poetry, short fiction about Other-Than-Human Realms. Payment: $5. Deadline: June 1, 2022.
Massachusetts Review. Restrictions: Open to writers and poets who identify as D/deaf, disabled, chronically ill, mentally ill, and/or neurodiverse. Genre: Fiction, poetry, hybrid, nonfiction. Payment: $100. Deadline: June 1, 2022.
The Offing: Enumerate. Genre: "Enumerate is our department of cataloging, of naming, of listing. It features work that is hybrid - cross-genre, and work in all genres (fiction, CNF, flash, poetry) - as long as it uses the form of a list (which you may interpret widely). Any length, any subject, any medium (i.e. text, video, photo, music, etc.). The lists should add up to some kind of literary foray, exploration, meditation, commentary, collage." Payment: $25–$100. Deadline: June 1, 2022.
Cosmic Roots and Eldritch Shores. Genre: Speculative stories. Payment: 8 cents/word for original work. 2 cents/word for reprints. Deadline: June 1–2, 2022.
Pillow Talking (Podcast). Genre: First person, narrative/creative nonfiction stories of real-life bedroom conversations. Theme: Blue. Payment: $25AUD. Deadline: June 4, 2022.
Havok. Genre: Flash fiction on Theme of LAZINESS / DILIGENCE. Payment: $10 via PayPal for each story published in an Anthology. Deadline: June 5, 2022.
Mslexia. Restrictions: Open to women writers. Genre: Fiction and poetry on theme: cogs and spindles, locking and unlocking - and what lies inside. Stories must be no longer than 2,200 words (which translates to a 15-minute radio broadcast slot) and poems up to 40 lines (the maximum that can comfortably fit onto a single page of the magazine). There is no lower word or line limit. You may send up to four poems and/or up to two stories on any one theme. Payment: £25. Deadline: June 6, 2022.
Cossmass Infinities. Genre: Science fiction and fantasy short stories. Payment: $0.08/word for original fiction. Deadline: June 7, 2022.
Scum. Genre: Feminist-friendly work of any variety, but as a general rule your piece should be under 2000 words (50 lines for poetry, max. 3 poems) and able to be classified as "fiction", "culture", "memoir", "column", "poetry", and/or "review". Payment: $60 AUD. Deadline: June 7, 2022. Opens to submissions on June 1.
Coastal Shelf. Genre: Fiction, nonfiction, poetry. Payment: $20 - $30. Deadline: June 7, 2022. Opens to submissions on June 1.
Diet Milk Magazine: Gothic. Genre: Gothic fiction, poetry, and art (drawings, paintings, comics, collages). Payment: $0.01/word for fiction (minimum $40); $15/poem; $50/art piece. Deadline: June 8, 2022.
Bright Wall/Dark Room. Genre: Essays on film and TV that engage in some way with the term voyeur. Payment: $50 per essay. Deadline: June 8, 2022.
Antithesis. Genre: Poetry, research articles, art, and short fiction, creative nonfiction, and personal essays up to 3,500 words on the theme of Tender. Payment: $50 AUD. Deadline: June 12, 2022.
Fusion Fragment. Genre: Science fiction or SF-tinged literary fiction stories and novelettes ranging anywhere from 2,000 to 15,000 words. Payment: Both previously unpublished work and reprints pay 3.5 cents (CAD) per word, up to a maximum of $300 (CAD) per story. Deadline: June 12, 2022. Opens June 10.
Mary Celeste. Genre: Horror. "Mutiny? Piracy? Or one of the ocean's greatest ghost stories? That's up to you! We all know of the mystery surrounding the Mary Celeste's 1872 voyage, but how many of us can really guess what happened? For this first volume, we'd love to see your interpretations. Our advice: think outside the box. There's only so many places those crew members could have gone… or is there something we haven't considered?" Payment: $10. Deadline: June 13, 2022.
Extra Teeth. Genre: Short fiction and nonfiction between 800 and 4,000 words. "We look for short stories that stick with you, lingering in the memory long after reading, and essays that explore specific interests or issues from a new perspective. We offer a space for writers to be strange, bold and experimental, and to express their unique style however they see fit." Payment: £100. Deadline: June 14, 2022.
Farmer-ish. Genre: Nonfiction, CNF, poetry related to farming (including recipes). Payment: $25. Deadline: June 14, 2022. See themes.
Plainsongs. Genre: Poetry. Payment: $50. Deadline: June 15, 2022.
Muse Magazine. Genre: Nonfiction articles for children. Payment: Not specified. Deadline: June 15, 2022. See themes.
Baffling. Genre: Speculative flash fiction. Length: Under 1200 words. Payment: 8 cents/word. Deadline: June 15, 2022.
The Dire Dark. Genre: Fantasy Horror. Payment: $.01 for Reprints. $.02 for Originals. Deadline: June 15, 2022.
Home Sweet Horror. Genre: Haunted houses, cursed dwellings, terrors close to home. Payment: Royalties. Deadline: June 15, 2022.
Midnight Echo. Restrictions: Open to Australians. Genre: Horror fiction, poetry, and non-fiction on horror-related subjects. Payment: AU$0.05/word for fiction. Deadline: June 15, 2022.
Medusa Tales. Genre: Speculative stories (sci-fi, fantasy, and horror) of human transformation and immobilization. Payment: 1 cent/word, $10 for reprints. Deadline: June 15, 2022. Accepts reprints.
The Four Faced Liar. Genre: Fiction and creative non-fiction (up to 4000 words); flash fiction (up to 1000 words); poetry (up to 3 pages); visual art (1 piece); translations. Payment: €200 for a short story or CNF piece, €100 for a poem or piece of flash, and €100 for visual art, as well as a copy of the magazine for each contributor. Deadline: June 15, 2022.
Bell Press Books. Genre: Poetry. Payment: $15 CAD, Deadline: June 15, 2022.
Bell Press Books. Genre: Poetry, CNF, art, fiction on theme: Rituals. Payment: $15 CAD, Deadline: June 15, 2022.
Bell Press Books. Restrictions: Canadians only. Genre: Poetry, CNF, art, fiction on theme: Framework of the Human Body. Payment: $15 CAD, Deadline: June 15, 2022.
Bull City Press. Genre: Poetry, Fiction, Nonfiction Chapbooks. Payment: Royalties (?) Deadline: June 15, 2022.
Channel. Genre: Fiction, art, creative non-fiction, and poetry that engages with the natural world, and have a particular interest in work which encourages reflection on human interaction with plant and animal life, landscape and the self. Payment: €40/poem, and €50/page of prose up to €150. Deadline: June 15, 2022.
Fourteen Poems Genre: Poetry. "We want to represent all that's thrilling about the new wave of LGBT+ poets. If you're a poet, even if you've never been published before, we want to read your work. Every issue we publish 14 of the best queer poems we've found, and we want to include you! We publish 4 times a year, but take submissions all year round. To be considered, email up to 5 poems, preferably in a pdf format, with a small paragraph about yourself to hello@14poems.com. Payment: £25 for each poem published. Deadline: June 15, 2022.
Eye to the Telescope. Genre: Speculative poetry. Payment: $0.03/word, up to $25. Deadline: June 15, 2022. See theme.
Grain Literary Magazine is a Canadian publication. Genres: Individual poems, sequences, or suites up to a maximum of 6 pages, fiction, literary nonfiction. Payment: $50 per page up to $250. Deadline: June 15, 2022.
White Enso. Genre: Original, unpublished short fiction, essays, creative non-fiction and artwork that encapsulates the Japan experience. Payment: Between 1000 and 1500 yen (US$10-$15). Deadline: June 15, 2022.
Dracula Beyond Stoker Magazine. Genre: "Stories with Dracula himself as the main focus. His name is on the cover of the book, but he's not the star of the show. Let's change that." Some poetry accepted. Payment: "Compensation will be monetary plus contributor's copies." Deadline: June 15, 2022.
Kaleidoscoped. Genre: Poetry, prose, media. "We are particularly interested in experimental and hybrid work across all mediums: send us your fragments, your experiments, your photographs, your drawn, your multi, your undefinable, your sound, your memory, your written, your stuff of resistance." Payment: "Small sum." Deadline: June 15, 2022.
Archive of the Odd. Genre: Horror. Submissions must relate to the theme of monsters and also be non-traditional prose. Length: 500 to 8,000 words. Payment: $0.01/word for short stories chosen for the zine, and an even split of 50% of the royalties. Deadline: June 15, 2022.
Mythulu Magazine. Genre: Capture an adulthood dilemma so universal it transcends culture and time - -then explain it so a child can understand. Payment: $0.06/word or $15/page. Non-fiction pays $0.08/word. Creative works earn $0.04/word, with short stories capped at $75. Deadline: June 16, 2022.
The Bureau Dispatch. Genre: For 2022, we're in the market for 15 to 20 short stories between 500 to 1,500 words. We want your best work. We want fiction that is compelling and beautifully-crafted; narratives that leave the reader breathless and changed. The kind of story that, when all is said and done, elicits a resounding "sh*t, yeah!" We are open to all narratives, but are currently partial to ones that explore the theme of epistolary stories and/or found things. Payment: $50. Deadline: June 17, 2022.
Foyer. Genre: Nonfiction and art "exploring untold stories from people of mixed, third culture and second-generation cultural heritage" on the theme of "Connect." Payment: £75 - £100. Deadline: June 17, 2022.
Pillow Talking (Podcast). Genre: First person, narrative/creative nonfiction stories of real-life bedroom conversations. Theme: Suddenly, Strangers. Payment: $25AUD. Deadline: June 18, 2022.
Maine Review. Genre: Short fiction, poetry. Payment: Fiction and Nonfiction writers receive a $25 honorarium per published flash (1,000 words or fewer) and a $50 honorarium for work 1,001 words or more. Poets receive a $25 honorarium per published poem. Deadline: June 19, 2022. (Opens June 13)
The Cellar Door: Woodland Terrors. Genre: Horror/thriller stories that take place in or near the woods. Payment: $25. Deadline: June 20, 2022
Flash Fiction Online. Genre: Speculative (science fiction, fantasy, slipstream, and horror) and literary fiction. Payment: $80. Deadline: June 21, 2022. Accept reprints.
Dark Dispatch. Genre: Dark fantasy, sci-fi, horror, and crime short stories on theme: Outsiders. Payment: $25 - $75 depending on length. (up to 5,000 words.) Deadline: June 22, 2022.
Story Seed Vault. Genre: Fiction based on science. Up to 200 characters. Payment: Up to $3AUD per story. Deadline: June 24, 2022.
Black Ocean. Genre: Full-length poetry manuscripts, BIPOC poets only. Payment: Royalties. Deadline: June 24, 2022.
Monster. Genre: Original monster stories. Payment: 1 cent/word and royalties. Deadline: June 24, 2022.
Neon Hemlock. Genre: Speculative novellas by trans women writers and writers of color. Length: Up to 40,000 words. Payment: Royalties. Deadline: June 25, 2022.
The Puritan. Genres: Fiction, nonfiction, poetry. Payment: $100 per nonfiction piece, $50 fiction, $15 per poem. Deadline: June 25, 2022.
ongoing. Genre: Prose in any genre up to 1000 words based on musical prompt. Payment: 30CAD. Deadline: June 26, 2022.
I Wasn't Strong Like This When I Started Out: True Stories of Becoming a Nurse. Genre: Creative Nonfiction essays by and about nurses. "We're looking especially for pandemic-era stories, which examine the complex and essential role nurses of all kinds have played in providing care and guidance for patients and families, as well as the ways in which the pandemic has affected both individuals and the healthcare system." Payment: Unspecified. Deadline: June 27, 2022.
Rough Cut Press. Restrictions: Open to LGBTQIA writers. Genre: Experimental fiction, nonfiction, art poetry. 650 words max. Payment: $25. Deadline: June 27, 2022. See themes.
Metaphysical Times. Genre: Pagan and metaphysical topics, including spirituality, religion, divination, witchcraft, and more. Payment: $0.05 USD per word up to 1200 words after editing. Deadline: June 29, 2022.
Allegory. Genre: Science Fiction, Fantasy and Horror. Payment: $15. Deadline: June 30th, 2022.
Best Asian Speculative Fiction Anthology. Genre: Asian Speculative Fiction. Pieces should be set in an Asian country and must have Asian main characters. Payment: $5. Deadline: June 30th, 2022. Reprints only.
Ripe Literary Journal. Genre: Poetry. Payment: $5. Deadline: June 30th, 2022.
Poetry Birmingham Literary Journal. Genre: Poetry, art. Payment: £25 per page. Deadline: June 30th, 2022.
Quarter Press: Myths Fables, and Folklore. Genre: Stories, art, poetry, nonfiction on theme: Myths Fables, and Folklore. Payment: $5. Deadline: June 30th, 2022.
Cloud Lake Literary. Restrictions: Canadian writers. Genre: Fiction, art. creative nonfiction, poetry, and children's literature (up to and including YA). Payment: $50 CAD/per page to a maximum of $150. Visual Art Submission: $50 /per submission. Deadline: June 30, 2022.
Autonomous Press: Spoon Knife. Genre: Short fiction, short memoir, and poetry The theme for Spoon Knife 7 is transitions. Preference will be given to submissions that are in some way flavored with queerness and/or neuroqueerness. Payment: 1 cent per word. Deadline: June 30, 2022.
Downstate Story. Genre: Short stories. Payment: $50. Deadline: June 30, 2022. Snail mail only.
Dancing Star Press. Genre: Speculative fiction novellas. Payment: Royalties. Deadline: June 30, 2022.
Willowherb. Restrictions: Open to writers of color. Genre: Previously unpublished non-fiction, fiction and poetry on nature, place, and environment. Payment: £250 for prose, £100 for poetry. Deadline: June 30, 2022.
Lovecraft: An Compendium of Eldritch Humor. Genre: Dark speculative humor. "Dark Speculative fiction which combines humor and something from the Cthulhu Mythos." Payment: $0.04/word. Deadline: June 30th, 2022. Open until filled.
Green Writers Press. Genres: Poetry, fiction, short story collections, environmental essay collections, middle-grade, and YA/teen fiction, artwork, and photography. Green Writers Press is an independent, Vermont-based publishing company, is dedicated to spreading environmental awareness and social justice by publishing authors who promulgate messages of hope and renewal through place-based writing and environmental activism. Payment: Royalties. Deadline: June 30th, 2022.
Kernel. Genre: Short stories, poetry, and/or art that imagines the future. "We are invested in understanding how technology and technologists play an active role in doing so." Payment: $50 - $300. Deadline: June 30th, 2022.
Fairy Tale Review. Genre: Queer fairy tales written by queer writers. Poetry, art, drama, and prose. Payment: $50. Deadline: June 30th, 2022.
bath magic. Genre: Poetry. Payment: £20. Deadline: June 30, 2022.
Freeze Frame Fiction. Genre: Flash fiction. "Any genre, no content restrictions. We want your science fiction, fantasy, horror, mystery, drama, literary works, satire, bizarre fiction, or anything else you can come up with or mix. The more original, the better. The weirder, the better." Payment: $10. Deadline: June 30, 2022.
VALRAVN. Genre: "Wyrd fiction" short stories (3,000 to 10,000 words). Horror, Espionage/Thriller, Science Fiction, Fantasy. Payment: $0.10 per word. Deadline: June 30, 2022.
Type house. Restrictions: In honor of Pride Month, no-fee submissions are open for all LGBTQIA2+/Queer creators, not limited to those in the US. Genre: Prose, poetry, art. Payment: $25. Deadline: June 30, 2022.
Haven Speculative. Genre: Speculative fiction and poetry. Payment: 1 cent/word for fiction and $5 - $10 for poetry. Deadline: June 30, 2022.
Mythic. Genre: Science fiction, fantasy short stories. Length: 2,000–5,000 words. Payment: 1 cent/word for original fiction, $25 for reprints. Deadline: June 30, 2022.
The Hudson Review. Genre: Fiction, poetry, essays, book reviews; criticism of literature, art, theatre, dance, film, and music; and articles on contemporary cultural developments. Payment: Not specified. Deadline: June 30th, 2022. (Poetry only)
Dragon Soul Press: Beautiful Darkness. Genre: "In a world where so many dark things go bump in the night, terror awaits around every corner as these authors take horror stories to the next level." Word Count - 5,000–15,000. Payment: Royalties. Deadline: June 30th, 2022.
Chestnut Review. Genre: Poetry, flash fiction, short fiction, creative nonfiction, essays, visual media (art/photography). Payment: $120. Deadline: June 30th, 2022. Submit early in the month to avoid submission fee.
Cast of Wonders. Genre: YA Speculative fiction. Podcast. Payment: $.08/word for original fiction of any length (yes, including flash!). For reprints, a $100 flat rate for Short Fiction, and a $20 flat rate for Flash Fiction. Deadline: June 30th, 2022. Limited Demographic: Young Authors (aged 19 or under at end of June).
Soldiers of the Old Ones. Genre: Lovecraftian horror tales of the people who fight for, sacrifice for, and work toward the takeover of the world by the Old Ones. Payment: $25. Deadline: June 30th, 2022, or until filled.
Kids Are Hell. Genre: Horror on theme: Children. 4K - 10K word count. Payment: $5. Deadline: June 30, 2022.
Rites of Passage: An Anthology of Queer Pagan Fiction. Genre: Fiction. This anthology will explore the theme of coming of age as a queer pagan. Payment: $25-$75. Deadline: June 30, 2022.
Strange Sunrises: Tales from Distant Planets. Genre: Science fiction stories that take place on another planet. Payment: $30USD. Deadline: June 30, 2022.
Strange Aeon. Genre: Stories in a cosmic horror/Lovecraftian vein. Payment: $20 - $35. Deadline: June 30, 2022, or until filled.
The Quarterly. Genre: Poetry, fiction, art, analysis. "Works with fantastical elements: scary, happy, creepy, heartbreaking, bizarre, hilarious, whatever." Payment: $5, Deadline: June 30, 2022. See themes.
New Gothic Review. Genre: Dark, gothic fiction. Word count: 1,500–5,000 words. Payment: $65. Deadline: June 30, 2022.
Threadcount. Genre: Prose, poetry, fiction, nonfiction, and hybrid text. "We prefer writing that resists such classifications. Primarily we focus on hybrid works between prose poetry and flash fiction." Payment: $25. Deadline: June 30, 2022.
Chicken Soup for the Soul: Funny Stories. Genre: True stories. "Share your funny stories about something that happened to you in your life - in your relationship with a partner or spouse, a parent or child, a family member or friend, at work or at home - that made you and the people around you laugh out loud. Did you mean for it to be funny? Did the other person mean to make you laugh? Did a situation just get out of control? Did a misunderstanding turn into a comedy of errors?" Payment: $200. Deadline: June 30, 2022.
Air and Nothingness Press: The Librarian. Genre: Stories about one Librarian's adventures roving through the multiverse. Theme: "The Librarian travels the multiverse (along the timeline - passed through the future - and across planetary systems and universes) helping out people, societies, and those in need, with their questions, problems, and research (as librarians do). Looking for positive, hopeful stories with positive endings, and narratives that celebrate librarians." Ideal story lengths are between 1000–3000 words. Payment: $0.08/word. Deadline: June 30, 2022.
Mud Season Review. Genre: Short stories, art, poetry, CNF. Payment: $50. Deadline: June 30th, 2022.
Game Over Books is a small Black and Queer-owned and operated publisher run collaboratively by a group of writers and working artists. "Our goal is to bust down the gatekeepers of traditional publishing while printing high-quality books by diverse writers. We strive to make our editing and publishing process honest, transparent and inclusive." Genre: Poetry and/or prose (fiction, non-fiction, poetry, essays, hybrid, etc.) manuscripts. Payment: Royalties (?) Deadline: June 30th, 2022.
Dark Matter: Monstrous Futures. Genre: Dark sci-fi with an emphasis on exploring our connection with technology and one another through speculative concepts and backdrops. Word Limit: 2000–4000 words, no exceptions. Payment: 8 cents/word. Deadline: June 30, 2022.
Brigid's Gate: Dangerous Waters: Deadly Women of the Sea. Genre: Short stories, poetry, and drabbles. "Theme: We're looking for horror or dark fantasy stories, poems, and drabbles about malevolent mermaids, sinister sirens, scary selkies, spirits, and other deadly and dangerous women of the sea. Stories including the ocean or sea are the focus of the anthology, but we will consider stories involving rivers as well." Payment: Stories: $0.08 a word; Poems: $50 a poem; Drabbles: $50 a drabble. Deadline: June 30, 2022.
Gollancz (an imprint of Hachette). Genre: Science fiction, fantasy, horror novels. Payment: Royalties, advance. Deadline: June 30, 2022.
Kaleidotrope. Genre: Speculative fiction and poetry - science fiction, fantasy, and horror, but also compelling work that blurs the lines between these and falls outside of neat genre categories. Payment: For fiction, $0.01/word (1 cent a word) USD. For poetry, a flat rate of $5 USD per accepted piece. For artwork, a flat rate of $60 for cover art. Deadline: June 30, 2022.
And a few more…
Les Petites Morts: An Anthology of Erotic Horror Inspired by Fairy Tales, Mythology & Folklore. Opens July 1. Deadline: TBA
Substantially Unlimited. Restrictions: Open to writers who identify as part of the disability community. Genre: Prose, up to 15 pages. Theme: Stigma. Payment: $15. Deadline: July 1, 2022. Reprints accepted.
The Cafe Irreal. Genre: Magical realism. 2,000 words max. Payment: 1 cent/word. Deadline: July 1, 2022.
Totally Entwined: Cupid's Academy. Genre: Novellas, 30,000–50,000 words. Theme: Enemies to lovers. LGBTQ focus. Payment: Royalties. Deadline: July 1, 2022.
The Twin Bill. Genre: Fiction, CNF, poetry, art about baseball. Payment: $10. Deadline: July 1, 2022.
Thema: The Crumpled Yellow Paper. Genre: Fiction, poetry, and art on theme: The Crumpled Yellow Paper. Payment: $10-$25 for short fiction and artwork, $10 for poetry. Deadline: July 1, 2022. Accepts reprints.
Horror Oasis: Darklit Press: The Sacrament. Genre: Religious Horror. Payment: $0.01 per word for new stories and/or $25 for reprints. Deadline: July 1, 2022. Accepts reprints.
It Came From the Trailer Park: Volume 2. Genre: Horror. Theme: Horror Comedy / Creature Feature. Payment: Royalties. Deadline: July 1, 2022.
Eerie River. Genre: Folk Horror. Word count: 1500–7000 firm. Payment: ¢1 per word CAD. Deadline: Deadline: July 1, 2022.
Alien Magazine. Genre: All types of fiction, nonfiction, poetry and visual art. Payment: $20. Deadline: July 1, 2022.
Unsettling Reads: Still of Winter. Genre: Horror, fantasy, scifi stories, poems, art. "Stories that unsettle, unnerve, frighten, discomfit, challenge, and/or just generally entertain on theme of Winter." Payment: $20. Deadline: July 1, 2022.
Minola Review. Restrictions: Open to women and non-binary writers. Genre: Poetry. Payment: $25. Deadline: July 1, 2022
Writer's beware newsletter great resource to research spam
A New Home For the Writer Beware Blog
Author: Victoria Strauss
Categories: Writer Beware
Welcome to the new home of the Writer Beware blog!
After many years on the Blogger platform, we have finally transitioned to WordPress, which offers much greater flexibility in terms of design, control, and ease of use.
We also have a new, easy to remember web address: writerbeware.blog.
I've been dissatisfied with Blogger for a while now. I'm not a web developer, but I'm not helpless, either; I maintain the Writer Beware website on the SFWA site, and I built and maintain two additional websites, my own and another for an organization my husband is part of. But every time I thought about moving to a new platform, the size of the challenge just seemed too daunting. How would I transfer hundreds of posts, not to mention the thousands of comments and images that go with them? What about all the non-working inbound links the move would create? Links wouldn't be a problem if I just started fresh on a brand-new WordPress site - but then the blog would exist on two platforms, with two different web addresses. And what about WB's thousands of followers and subscribers?
The turning point came last summer, when the only email subscription widget supported by Blogger discontinued service. If people couldn't subscribe to the WB blog, there was just no reason to remain on Blogger. But the amount of time and research involved in moving made me want to lie down and go to sleep (you may know that Writer Beware is a volunteer effort: I do this in my off hours).
Enter the Automattic Special Projects Team, which helps noteworthy and/or interesting people and projects with development, design, hosting services, and more. In an amazing bit of synchronicity, they contacted me around the same time that my subscription service disappeared, with an offer to not only build a new WordPress website for the WB blog, but to port all posts, comments, and subscribers to the new site and re-direct all Blogger links. In other words…to do all of the stuff I'd been dreading - and create a better and more functional site than I could have on my own.
After many months of design consults and bug fixes, this is the result. Not just a clean new look and way more administrative control for me, but a better subscription service and a much more robust search function (another peeve I had with Blogger, whose search options suck). I'm deeply grateful to the Special Projects Team for their hard work, and for their support of Writer Beware.
The one thing I'm sad to lose is our old web address: accrispin.blogspot.com. It's a legacy (one of many) of the late Ann Crispin, Writer Beware's co-founder, and my dear friend. Ann started the blog in 2005, originally intending it to be her blog; but after she invited me to join her, it quickly became all Writer Beware, all the time. Looking back at those posts reminds me of how much fun Ann and I had in those early days, and how profoundly her energy, fearlessness, and dedication shaped what Writer Beware has become. We're leaving behind a URL, but Ann is still present in everything we do.
If you've come here from a link on social media, please have a look around our new home and tell me what you think! If you're a subscriber, this is the first newsletter that has landed in your Inbox since last summer. I hope you'll continue to subscribe - and for those of you who are new to Writer Beware, I hope you'll consider signing up via the form below this post.
Don't forget that the blog is just one component of the many-headed beast that is Writer Beware. There's also our website, which provides a wide range of information, cautions, and resources to help writers educate and protect themselves; our Facebook page, which links to items of writerly interest and provides a forum for discussion; my Twitter feed, where I regularly post updates, warnings, and industry news; and our email address, beware@sfwa.org, where you can contact us - in confidence - with reports, complaints, and questions.
Finally, a huge THANK YOU to all the writers, agents, editors, and others who've shared complaints and documentation over the years and helped us build our database; to all the people who send me tips and information; to everyone who spreads the word about Writer Beware (and writing scams in general); and to our fans, followers, and subscribers. We couldn't do it without you, and we are grateful for your support.
Onward!
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Winning writers list


Winning Writers Newsletter - December 2021
Inbox

The best free contests through January 31 |
Have trouble viewing this email? View the web version.
We found almost five dozen excellent free poetry and prose contests with deadlines between December 15-January 31. In this issue, we revisit an old favorite, T.S. Eliot's "The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock", illustrated by Julian Peters.
Open at Winning Writers, co-sponsored by Duotrope
WERGLE FLOMP HUMOR POETRY CONTEST - NO FEE
Free to enter, $3,500 in prizes, including a top award of $2,000. Judged by Jendi Reiter, assisted by Lauren Singer.
TOM HOWARD/JOHN H. REID FICTION & ESSAY CONTEST
$8,000 in prizes, including two top awards of $3,000 each. $20 entry fee. We are promoting Mina Manchester to be the final judge of this contest. Congratulations, Mina!
View past newsletters in our archives. Need assistance? Let us help. Join our 135,000 followers on Twitter. Advertise with us (buy your newsletter ads now, the price will increase from $150 to $175 on January 1).
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Last Call! Virginia Woolf Award for Short Fiction


First Prize: $2,500, publication in LitMag, and agency review
Finalists: Three finalists will receive $100 each
All finalists will be considered for possible agency review and publication.
Deadline: December 31
Contest Fee: $20. Entries must be unpublished short stories between 3,000 and 8,000 words. Submit through Submittable only. See the results of previous contests.
Contributors to LitMag include John Ashbery, Paul Auster, Elvis Bego, Harold Bloom, Jamel Brinkley, Blake Butler, Kelly Cherry, William H. Gass, Tony Kushner, Jhumpa Lahiri, Ange Mlinko, Kevin Moffett, Chinelo Okparanta, Sigrid Nunez, Charles Simic, Terese Svoboda, Justin Taylor, Corinna Vallianatos, Rosanna Warren, and more.
New! The Winning Writers Critique Service

For years people have asked us about getting critiques of their works. At last, we have a service for you!
Books and Manuscripts: $135
We have engaged contest judge and literary scholar Annie Mydla to provide expert private critiques of your books and manuscripts, published or unpublished, that have up to 200,000 words. Annie has read thousands of self-published books in her work as an assistant judge for our North Street Book Prize. She is also a published literary scholar whose works can be found in Avant Literary Journal, Joseph Conrad Today, and most recently in the international journal Świat I Słowo ("World and Word"). Learn more.
Poems, Stories, and Essays: $90
After a trial run in November, we are rolling out critiques of shorter works. We have set the price at $90 so we can prepare the kind of personalized critique that authors have found to be most helpful. Annie Myla and Lauren Singer are joining Tracy Koretsky so we can accommodate more orders. Learn more.
As always, we have set our pricing at or below that of leading competitors while aiming to provide superior service. We also guarantee your satisfaction. If our critique does not deliver value for you, you may request a prompt refund from adam@winningwriters.com.
Recent Honors and Publication Credits for Our Subscribers
Congratulations to Pamela Summers (featured poem: "This Time Last Year"), Hal Niedzviecki, Gary Greene (featured poem: "While I'm Sleeping"), Linda Neal (featured poem: "The New Amazon"), Rosanne Dingli (featured poem: "Flood Delusion"), Sally Bellerose, Joseph Stanton, Ruth Thompson, Rick Lupert, William Huhn, Dan Klefstad, Samantha Terrell, Eva Tortora, Joanie Holzer Schirm, and Kayleb Rae Candrilli.
Winning Writers Editor Jendi Reiter was interviewed for Trish Hopkinson's Tell Tell Poetry series in November. Watch the 30-minute video on Trish's writing opportunities blog.
Learn about our subscribers' achievements and see links to samples of their work.
Have news? Please email it to jendi@winningwriters.com.
Announcement
Ask Me Anything with ANNIE MYDLA, December 16, 12–2pm EST

Do you have questions about writing contests, journal submissions, promoting your work on social media, avoiding scams, locating resources for writers, or anything else on getting your work out there? From 12–2 pm Eastern US Time, Annie Myla, North Street Book Prize judge and moderator of r/literarycontests, the largest Reddit subreddit for submissions opportunities worldwide, will field questions on all topics, especially:
• Writing contests
• Journal submissions
• Mistakes to avoid while submitting your work
• Promoting your work on social media
• Partnering with other organizations to promote your work
• Avoiding scams
• The state of publishing/self-publishing today
• Locating the resources you need as a writer, poet, and/or self-publisher
There's no cost, so join us to ask questions, share your experiences in submissions and self-publishing, or just say hi!
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Atmosphere Press currently seeks great manuscripts, and they'll be the publisher you've always wanted: attentive, organized, on schedule, and professional. They use a model in which the author funds the initial publication of the book, but retains 100% rights, royalties, and artistic autonomy. From an exceptional editorial team through book design and into promotion, partnering with Atmosphere is the way to do your book right.
So, send your manuscript their way. Submissions are free and open to everyone and in all genres.
Ad: Last Call! Oprelle's 2021 Holiday "COMING HOME" Poetry Contest

Deadline: December 20
What does home look like to you? Is it an old farmhouse, a certain person, a childhood bedroom, a river you run to? Think about when you feel most rooted. Where in the world do you feel most at peace, most yourself? Write a poem that takes us there with you.
A home doesn't have to be a building with four walls. It can be a state of being. We want to know what exactly "home" means to you!
• First Prize: $200, a poem published on oprelle.com, certificate
• Second Prize: $100 and a certificate
• Third Prize: $50 and a certificate
The contest is open to anyone age 14 and up who writes poetry. Parents and guardians may submit on behalf of children who are 14–17. Each poem must have 1–20 lines (220 words maximum). Entry fee: $15 per poem. Submit up to two entries. Judge: Susan (Manchin) Dines. Learn more and submit via Submittable or by mail.
Ad: Last Call! Two Sylvias Press WILDER POETRY BOOK PRIZE for Women Over 50

Deadline: December 31
Attention Women Poets:
Two Sylvias Press is looking to publish Full-Length Poetry Manuscripts by Women Over 50
(Open to both established and emerging poets)
Prize: $1,000 and print book publication by Two Sylvias Press, 20 copies of the winning book, and a vintage art nouveau pendant
The Wilder Series Poetry Book Prize is open to women over 50 years of age (born on or before December 31, 1971). Women submitting manuscripts may be poets with one or more previously published chapbooks/books or poets without any prior chapbook/book publications. (We use an inclusive definition of "woman" and "female" and we welcome trans women, genderqueer women, and non-binary people who are significantly female-identified.) All manuscripts will be considered for publication. See the complete contest guidelines.
Learn more about the prize and Two Sylvias Press. Previous winners & manuscripts chosen for the Wilder Poetry Book Prize include Michelle Bitting, Gail Martin, Kelly Cressio-Moeller, Erica Bodwell, Adrian Blevins, Dana Roeser, Molly Tenenbaum, and Carmen Gillespie.
Simultaneous submissions are allowed.
NOTE: Our mission at Two Sylvias Press is to support poets. Your manuscript will NOT be disqualified if it was submitted incorrectly. We will not penalize you for trying and making a mistake. If we have a question or concern about your manuscript format, we will contact you and allow you to resubmit. Please know that we are on your side. Thank you for trusting us with your work.
Ad: Discovery Poetry Contest
The Joan Leiman Jacobson Poetry Prizes
Deadline: January 11, 2022, 5 pm Eastern US Standard Time
For over 60 years 92Y's Discovery Contest has launched the careers of major poets like John Ashbery, Lucille Clifton, Mark Strand, Larry Levis, Mary Jo Bang, Solmaz Sharif, and Diana Khoi Nguyen, to name but a few. Will you be next?
The contest is open to poets who have not published a full-length poetry collection. Submit one entry of up to 10 pages of poems. At least two of the poems must be one page or shorter. Include a cover letter and a $15 entry fee.
Four winners receive a reading at 92Y, publication in The Paris Review Daily, a two-night residency at the ACE Hotel, and $500 each. Winners will be contacted by telephone in April 2022; all contest entrants will be emailed the names of the winners shortly thereafter.
The 2022 preliminary judges are Sumita Chakraborty and Timothy Donnelly. The final judges are Victoria Chang, Brian Teare, and Philip B. Williams.
Read selections by last year's winners: Kenzie Allen, Ina Cariño, Mag Gabbert, and Alexandra Zukerman.
To apply, please follow the complete guidelines and submit them here.
This contest is endowed by Joan L. and Dr. Julius H. Jacobson, II.
Ad: Last Call! Lilith Magazine Annual Fiction Contest (no fee)

Deadline extended to January 15, 2022
Calling all gifted fiction writers! Lilith Magazine - Independent, Jewish & frankly feminist - seeks quality short fiction full of heart, soul, and chutzpah, 3,000 words or under, for our Annual Fiction Contest. The first prize is $250 and publication. We especially like working with both feminist and Jewish content and are eager to read submissions from writers of color and emerging writers of any age.
Please submit to info@Lilith.org with "Fiction Contest" and your name in the subject line and full contact information on your manuscript.
No fee to enter. Please mention you saw our ad in the Winning Writers newsletter.
Ad: Rattle Chapbook Prize

Deadline: January 15, 2022
The annual Rattle Chapbook Prize gives poets something truly special. Every year, three winners will each receive $5,000 cash, 500 contributor copies, and distribution to Rattle's ~8,000 subscribers. In a world where a successful full-length poetry book might sell 1,000 copies, the winning book will reach an audience eight times as large on its release day alone - an audience that includes many other literary magazines, presses, and well-known poets. This will be a chapbook to launch a career.
And maybe the best part is this: The $25 entry fee is just a standard subscription to Rattle, which includes four issues of the magazine and the winning chapbook, even if it isn't yours. Rattle is one of the most-read literary journals in the world - find out why just by entering! For more information, visit our website.
We congratulate our three winners from our 2021 contest:
• Gil Arzola, The Death of a Migrant Worker (September 2021)
• Amanda Newell, I Will Pass Even to Acheron (December 2021)
• Elizabeth Ambrose Johnston, Imago, Dei (March 2022)
Please enjoy a poem from Amanda Newell's winning chapbook, just published this month:
Stoic
When I see how swollen and purple it is
and how the skin, like a film of dried glue,
stretches over the bones
of his foot - so clearly now not a foot,
curled as it is like a parenthesis,
already half-afterthought - I wonder if it would be
less painful if it crumbled
onto his white sheets like rain-soaked wood
since it's just one limb
and no longer, he says, any good to him.
Ad: The DISQUIET Literary Prize

Deadline: January 24, 2022
Submit now to the DISQUIET Literary Prize! This contest is for writing in fiction, nonfiction, or poetry by a writer who has not yet published more than one book with a major press. The first prize winners in each genre will be published:
• the fiction winner in Granta.com
• the nonfiction winner in Ninthletter.com
• the poetry winner in The Common
One grand prize winner will receive a full scholarship including tuition, lodging, and a $1,000 travel stipend to Lisbon in 2022 (June 26-July 8). Genre winners will receive a $500 cash prize in addition to publication. Reading fee: $15.
Read the full contest guidelines and enter at Submittable.
Ad: 2022 William Saroyan International Prize for Writing
Entries must be received by January 31, 2022
Submissions are now being accepted for the 10th William Saroyan International Prize for Writing. Two prizes of $5,000 each are given for works of fiction and nonfiction. The awards, co-sponsored by Stanford Libraries and the William Saroyan Foundation, are intended to encourage new or emerging writers and honor the Saroyan legacy of originality, vitality, and stylistic innovation.
Submit five copies of your work published between January 1, 2020, and December 31, 2021, with a $50 entry fee by January 31, 2022. Writers who have published four or more books are ineligible. Visit the Saroyan Prize website for complete eligibility and submission details.
Congratulations to our 2020 Fiction Winner Nana Kwame Adjei-Brenyah for Friday Black, and our 2020 Nonfiction Winner Jennifer Croft for Homesick. View our complete list of 2020 winners and finalists.
Ad: On The Premises Short Story Contest (no fee)
Deadline: Friday, March 4, 2022, 11:59 pm Eastern US Standard Time
Last time we checked, 77% of web-based fiction magazines pay their fiction writers nothing.
So did 60% of print-only fiction magazines!
If you'd like to try getting paid for your fiction, why not consider us? Since 2006, On The Premises magazine, has aimed to promote newer and/or relatively unknown writers who can write creative, compelling stories told in effective, uncluttered, and evocative prose. We've never charged a reading fee or publication fee, and we pay between $75 and $250 for short stories that fit each issue's broad story premise. We publish stories in nearly every genre (literary/realist, mystery, light/dark fantasy, light/hard sci-fi, slipstream) aimed at readers older than 12 (no children's fiction).
The premise of our 39th contest is "Arrival". For this contest, write a well-crafted story between 1,000 and 5,000 words long in which… IN THE FIRST SENTENCE… one or more characters arrive at a location and find something unexpected. Remember, this action has to happen in the story's first sentence!
Any genre except children's fiction, exploitative sex, or over-the-top gross-out horror is fine. We will not accept parodies of another author's specific fictional characters or world(s). We will accept serious literary drama, crazy farces, and any variation of science fiction and fantasy you can imagine. Read our past issues and see!
You can find details and instructions for submitting your story here. To be informed when new contests are launched, subscribe to our free, short, monthly newsletter.
"On The Premises" magazine is recognized in Duotrope, Writer's Market, Ralan.com, the Short Story and Novel Writers guidebooks, and other short story marketing resources.
Ad: Three Funerals for My Father by Jolie Phuong Hoang

From the author of Anchorless, winner of the 2020 North Street Book Prize for Literary Fiction
What would you risk to save your children?
Jolie Hoang grew up as one of ten children, part of a loving, prosperous Vietnamese family. All that changed when the communists took over in 1975; the family lived in constant fear of being sent to the dreaded "new economic zone". Desperate to ensure the family's safety and to provide a future for his children, Jolie's father arranged three separate escapes. The first was a failure that cost most of their fortune, but the second was successful - six of his children reached Indonesia and ultimately settled in Canada. He and his youngest daughter drowned during the disastrous third attempt.
Jolie Hoang's escape and the aftermath, which included nine days on a boat and 14 months in an Indonesian refugee camp before coming to Canada, was left out of Anchorless because her father wasn't there. However, in Three Funerals for My Father, she shares the harrowing story.
Alternately told from the author's perspective and that of her father's ghost, Three Funerals for My Father is a poignant story of love, grief, and resilience that spans three countries and fifty years. It is an intimate story of one family, a testament to the collective experience of the "boat people" who escaped communist Vietnam, and a plea on behalf of the millions of refugees currently seeking asylum across the globe.
"This is a story of familial love in its purest and finest form…a modern classic…should be required reading in any secondary school."
 - Alexander McGlashan, 5-star Goodreads review
Buy now from Tidewater Press, Amazon, and other fine booksellers worldwide.
Ad: Jendi Reiter's Two Natures: "Engaging and Real"

Recent 5-star reviews on Amazon are praising Jendi Reiter's debut novel Two Natures as "engaging and real" and "a very satisfying read [that] goes to the roots of human nature". Winner of the Rainbow Award for Best Gay Contemporary Fiction, Two Natures is the spiritual coming-of-age story of an NYC fashion photographer during the 1990s AIDS crisis.
Read an excerpt from the novel.
Buy it now at Saddle Road Press.
Spotlight Contests (no fee)
Some contests are best suited to writers at the early stages of their careers. Others are better for writers with numerous prizes and publications to their credit. Here is this month's selection of Spotlight Contests for your consideration:
Emerging Writers
Ezra Jack Keats Children's Book Award. The University of Southern Mississippi will award $5,000 in the New Writer and New Illustrator categories for published picture books that portray the universal qualities of childhood, a strong and supportive family, and the multicultural nature of our world. Books must have been first published in North America and the English language. Authors may be of any nationality. Winners must attend a ceremony at the University of Southern Mississippi to receive the award. No self-published titles. Only original stories qualify for the New Writer award; no folktales or retellings. The publisher must send 11 copies of the book for consideration to the various addresses specified on the sponsor's website. Due December 31.
Intermediate Writers
Neil Postman Award for Metaphor. Rattle will award $2,000 for the best use of metaphor in a poem published in the journal. Submissions are accepted year-round. Send up to 4 unpublished poems, of any length. Wait for a decision on your first entry before submitting more. All poems published in Rattle in a given year are automatically considered for this award. No separate application process. Due December 31 (rolling deadline).
Advanced Writers
Four Quartets Prize. The Poetry Society of America will award $21,000 for a unified and complete sequence of poems, 14 pages minimum, published in the US in a print or online journal, chapbook, or book during the current year. Self-published works are ineligible. Poet, publisher, or agent may send an entry form, four copies of the sequence of poems, and four copies of a paragraph-length statement describing its aims. Due December 31.
See more Spotlight Contests for emerging, intermediate, and advanced writers within The Best Free Literary Contests database.
Calls for Submissions
Winning Writers finds open submission calls and free contests in a variety of sources, including Erika Dreifus' Practicing Writer newsletter, FundsforWriters, Trish Hopkinson's blog, Erica Verrilli's blog, Authors Publish, Lambda Literary, Lit Mag News Roundup, Poets & Writers, The Writer, Duotrope, Submittable, and literary journals' newsletters and announcements.
• Clock house
(poetry, fiction, essays, drama - December 15)
• OpenDoor Magazine: "Alternatives" Issue
(poetry, stories, articles, artwork, or songs on this theme - December 15)
• Poetry Magazine: "Egophony" Issue
(poetry by non-native English speakers - December 16)
• letter
(women's first-person accounts including letters, prose poems, and journal entries - December 31)
• The Best New True Crime Stories: Crimes of the Famous and Infamous
(narrative journalism about celebrity crimes - January 1)
• Rain Fiction Pod: "Curiosity Killed the Cat"
(stories about an exciting discovery gone wrong - January 4)
• Abandoned Mine
(accessible poetry that makes an emotional impact - January 15)
• Flowers & Vortexes
(poetry and artwork - April 4)
PSA: The Gift of Literacy
Preliteracy, the largest adult literacy and basic education membership organization in the US, believes that a safer, stronger, and more sustainable society starts with an educated adult population. For more than 60 years, Preliteracy has been working across the globe to change lives and communities through the power of literacy.
"In the last year, I couldn't spell green," says Henry, an adult student. "If I saw a word like perfect I'd just pass it up. In the last eight months, I haven't had to ask for as much help. Reading changes lives. It makes you more responsible for your life. Not reading can hurt you."
Share the gift of literacy today.
Award-Winning Poems
THE KINDREDS
by Meredith Stricker
Winner of the 2020 Tupelo Press Dorset Prize
Postmark Deadline: December 31
This prestigious award for a full-length manuscript gives a $3,000 cash prize, publication, and a week-long residency at MASS MoCA, a modern art museum in North Adams, MA, valued at $1,500. Stricker's re-wilding won the 2020 contest. This philosophical poem-sequence suggests that humans' family members include animals, plants, and so-called inanimate natural features such as rocks and rivers. "if a corporation is a person does it wake up/in dread like a person sometimes does", she queries half in jest, concluding that "if trees/have no soul/then neither/do we".
HOW TO IDENTIFY YOURSELF WITH A WOUND (2012)
by KB
Winner of the 2021 Saguaro Poetry Prize
Entries must be received by December 31
This poetry chapbook prize from Kallisto Gaia Press gives $1,200 and publication. In the title poem of their winning collection, the speaker recreates the memory of a playground fight with a frenemy who called them a homophobic slur, holding the painful sensations alongside a broader view of the oppressions that stressed both participants: "I saw her/biting into my arm, wishing that justice would come spilling out."
MOZART IN THE XXI CENTURY
by Leonora Simonovis
Winner of the 2021 Colorado Prize for Poetry
Postmark Deadline: January 14
This long-running award from Colorado State University gives $2,500 and publication for a full-length collection. Simonovis' debut collection Study of the Raft won the most recent contest. This poem recounts the tragic heroism of a young Venezuelan man who was tortured by the Maduro regime for playing his violin at a protest.
from HOSPITAL PAMPHLET
by Paul Hlava Ceballos
Winner of the 2021 Donald Hall Prize for Poetry
Entries must be received between January 1-February 28
This competitive award for a full-length poetry manuscript is sponsored by AWP and includes $5,500 and publication by the University of Pittsburgh Press. Ceballos won the most recent contest with his collection banana [ ], an expansion of his chapbook about the brutal exploitation of South American workers and land by the Del Monte fruit company. In this visionary selection from his long poem "Hospital Pamphlet", an organ transplant technician muses about the lives that exist inside other lives, as past and future are superimposed on each other.
"The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock", illustrated by Julian Peters (part one)
Here begins the complete 24-page comic-book adaptation of "The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock" by T.S. Eliot, illustrated by Julian Peters. We will reprint all 24 pages over the next several newsletters.
Need a last-minute holiday gift? Order Poems to See By, a handsome book of 24 classic poems with illustrations by Mr. Peters.



To be continued in our January 15 newsletter
The Last Word
Why Witchcraft?
As I've made a safer life for myself, and opened up to the experience of embodiment, divinity no longer seems remote and capricious. Witchcraft teaches me to attune to the presence of benevolent consciousnesses and accessible spiritual gifts in every aspect of the physical world. Self begins to feel more porous and continuous with the earth's cycles of death and renewal - a great comfort during this pandemic.
Read more
Jendi Reiter is the editor of Winning Writers.
Follow Jendi on Twitter at @JendiReiter.
© 2001–2021 Winning Writers. All rights reserved except for fair use.
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Sample Cover Letter and Bio
Your cover letter should have all your major sites listed;
Mine looks like this
John(Jake) Cosmos Aller
Novelist, poet, retired U.S. Diplomat
PSC 450, Box 63
APO AP 96206
Tel: 703–436–1402
Email: authorjakecosmosaller@gmail.com
Web: Https://theworldaccordingtocosmos.com
Twitter: jakecaller, allerjc2
Followed by standard verbiage including bio
I am submitting the following poems for your chapbook open reading period.
Acknowledgment:
These poems were written for the April Poetry month this year. They were based on prompts supplied by NaPoWrMo, Poetry Superhighway, Local Gems, and Writers Digest, and posted on All poetry, Writing.com, Fan Story, Poetry Superhighway, Poetry Soup, and Writers 'Digest, and on my blog, Https://theworldaccordingtocosmos.com, but not otherwise submitted or published. I have compiled my poems written for the last five April Poetry contests so this is just part of a broader collection of poems. I am submitting 12 poems out of the two hundred poems written during the challenge.
Index
Warming Up to the Day Writers Digest prompt
Re-born Dream Girl Local Gem prompt
No More April Fool's Day! Writers 'Digest prompt
Insomnia Blues Writing.com Dew Drop In prompt Sleep - 
Second Chances? Writer's Digest prompt
A Solivagant's Journey To Distant Times NaNoWriMo Prompt
Alone Glosa NaPoWriMo
Power of Love Sidewalk Poem Writing com prompt
The Smells of Korean food Writers Digest prompt
Something Fixable Local Gems prompt
You can't fix stupid something unfixable local gems
Sam Adams Goes Down the Rabbit Hole, NaNoPoMo Prompt
I have been writing poetry and short stories for decades and have published my poetry and fiction in over 25 literary journals. My poetry can best be described as "neo-beatnik" as growing up in Berkeley I was heavily influenced by the beatnik writers. I also just launched my web page, "the World According to Cosmos" which features my writing and political and other observations. The URL is https://theworldaccordingtocosmos.com
I have completed five SF novels, - Giant Nazi Spiders, the Great Divorce, Jurassic Cruise, Ft. Ashland, and Timeless Love Stories. I have completed ten volumes of poetry (over 3,000 poems) and one volume of short stories. Over 35 35 literary journals and sites have published my work, and complete publication credits are available upon request.
During my foreign service career, I served in ten countries (Korea, Thailand, India, the Eastern Caribbean (lived in Barbados but covered Antigua, Barbados, Dominica, Grenada, St Kitts, St Lucia, and St Vincent), and Spain. I grew up in Berkeley, California, and have lived all over the U.S. and overseas. I currently spend half the year in Korea and half the year in the United States.
Regards,
Jake Cosmos Aller
Bio Follows:
John ("Jake") Cosmos Aller is a novelist, poet, and retired U.S. Foreign Service officer with the U.S. State Department. Before joining the U.S. State Department, Jake taught overseas for eight years, and served in the Peace Corps He grew up in Berkeley. His poetry blog can be found at https://theworldaccordingtocosmos.com
Publication credits - when is something considered published or not?
There are three things to consider. Starting you need to get published widely. The open poetry forums sometimes count and sometimes don't. once you have been published on the free to enter sites unpaid sites you can move up to trying the paid literary sites. But remember that many literary sites consider any publication online to be published, so you have to be selected what you post. I usually only post things I have already posted or have published and reserve about half of my writing as "unpublished). Read the submission guidelines and look at their latest issue if you can, and submit widely. It is a numbers game.
95% rejection rate is the norm, rule of ten
But 90 % rejection rate is the norm for everyone. Just the name of the game.
Of 100 people who want to write a novel, 10 will finish that novel. Of those who finish it, 10 percent will get published through a traditional publisher, and maybe 30 percent self-publish. In any event, only 5 of the original hundred will be published. Of those who get published only 10% will make any money (most will lose money, particularly the self-publishing people) In other words of the thousands of people who attempt to get published, only a hand full will make money full-time and any of the others make living selling webinars, etc teaching our "their secrets" that they don't want you to know and promising that any can publish on Kindle for free. i.e. the Self-publishing school. That may be so, but unless you have a team behind you - a publishing company and self-publishing services (editorial services are essential. you won't make any money at it. These seminars cost hundreds of dollars. I made the mistake of taking a couple of these courses and found that it was mostly things I already knew. Hint: the Do It Yourself MFA program folks.
Scams
There are lots of contests out, many are legit but many are scams. Things to look for are excessive fees or excessive awards or offers of self-service publication. Check them out at the winning writer's list below or writers beware. When in doubt don't submit. I have been burned before.
Many of these sites will publish you but then sell you the book. The more legitimate places will send you the link to your site and give you a free subscriber's only e-copy. In the end, they are there to make money. A few will pay you. So far I have made 300 dollars.
There are lots of sites that claim they can teach you the secrets of becoming a published writer and that is so easy to make money at it. The sad reality is this the rule of ten still applies.
Edit Edit Edit
Do a through a self-edit as you can - Grammarly works, Pro-writer, Edit, or read out loud are the minimum. Join some writing groups - FB has some good ones, Linkidlin is for serious published writers only it seems - they are intimidating to approach. Writing com Poet's Place is great as are their daily challenges. Fan story can be good. Poetry soup as well.
How to read rejection notices
And now the last piece of unsolicited advice. Rejection notices come in three flavors - a form letter that says it was not for us, sorry. A nicer letter that invites you to re-submit. And occasionally a horrid in-your-face email rejection. And the last one with detailed critiques.
If you get the second or last one submit it. They are telling you that they do want to read more of your stuff, but don't re-submit -send them new stuff and wait a month or so I always thank them for considering my work. If you get the "evil gram " save it could become useful if you become famous. Stephen King saved most of them as did the Harry Potter author. Never respond to the evil grams other than a generic thank you for reading my work. The worst ones are the evil ones followed by a solicitation to use their services. BIG SCAM ALERT Run away!
A few places have liked my work. Scarlet Leaf, Scars, and Two Drops of Ink are great sites that have published my work.
There are several others out there but that's enough for now. Please feel free to let me know if you find out other useful sites.
Other useful sites
Winning Writers has a list of legit free contests as well as places to avoid
The following is the to-avoid list
We suggest you avoid the following contests and organizations. Many appear to be disguised vanity publishers, whose goal is to sell you expensive personalized products and attract you to conferences. Others may charge you membership or service fees for which the benefits are questionable, or which can be obtained elsewhere for free. Still, others claim the right to publish your entry whether or not you win a prize. Winning prizes from these organizations will add little to your resume, and may even make you look amateurish to publishers and other poets.

10KCASH Contest
America Library of Poetry
The Amherst Society
Appellee Publishing
The Brightest Arena (Words Aglow)
Cader Publishing
Circle of Poets
Eber & Wein
Famous Poets Society (aka Christian Poets Guild)
Forward Poetry
Free editorial Literary Contest
Greenspring Publishing
Iliad Press (an imprint of Cader Publishing)
Iliad Literary Awards Program
International Library of Photography (aka Picture.com)
International Library of Poetry
International Poetry Digest
International Poetry Hall of Fame
International Society of Poets
JMW Publishing Company
League of American Poets (poetryamerica.com)
The National Amateur Poetry Competition (Eber & Wein)
The National Archives
National Library of Poetry
Noble House (an affiliate of Watermark Press)
Paramount Group
Picture.com (aka International Library of Photography)
Poetry Institute of Africa
Poetry Institute of Canada
Poetry Laureates
Poetry Nation
Poetry Press
Poetry Press Publishing (songwritingopportunities.com)
Poetry Publications International (The Poet's Yearbook; The Top 100 Poems of [Year])
Poetry Revival Contest
Poetry Unlimited
The Poets' Guild
PoetsOnly.com
The Poets' Workshop (www.poets.com and World Poetry Movement)
PublishMyPoetry.net
Sparrowgrass Poetry Forum
Stamford Research
TA.TI. Edizioni
United Press
Watermark Press
White Oak Press (aka Poetry America)
World Poetry Movement
Z Publishing
I'd add Poetry International to the list - that appears to be a scam.
The most common pitch is to make poets buy their anthologies as a condition of publication. Publishers in this category include Famous Poets Society, Sparrowgrass Poetry Forum, The Amherst Society, The Poets' Guild, Poetry Press, Poetry Unlimited, The National Archives, and JMW Publishing. Others try to sell you services, such as manuscript editing or agency representation.
Vanity contests are characterized by low standards and are willing to publish most of the submissions they receive (typically half or more). They primarily market their publications to the contestants themselves, often at high prices. Few copies are sold to independent buyers or libraries. A vanity contest is not necessarily a "scam". It may disclose its terms and selection procedures fully and accurately. Nevertheless, all of the contests above are a waste of your time. There are plenty of better ones to submit to, selective contests that want to promote good work to a wider audience.
Some of the contests that target schools, such as Polar Expressions Publishing, Young Writers of Canada, and Creative Communication/Poetic Power, make us uncomfortable. These contests exercise a modest degree of selectivity, accepting 25–80% of entries. While this is better than publishing virtually all entries, we prefer more rigorous contests that reserve praise and publicity for truly outstanding work. We're concerned that excessive praise for average work may confuse writers about the meaning of excellence and weaken their drive to improve.
Watch out for online critique forums and social networking sites that offer what appear to be free contests, but make unreasonable claims to your intellectual property rights in the fine print. Some online contests require you to post an entire book-length manuscript for reader votes; this may prevent you from shopping the manuscript elsewhere if it does not win the contest because it would already be considered "published". Other contests assert the right to publish all entries without notice or compensation, which is not a good deal for writers and not a normal practice among reputable contests. Also be wary of contests that assert derivative rights over all winning or submitted entries, such as the right to make and distribute audio/video versions or translations. Reputable contests may ask writers for a license to reproduce their work in other media, but it should always be clear that the writer retains creative control over the end product and the right to terminate the license.
Writers considering self-publishing should read BookBaby's article on spotting self-publishing scams. Be wary of service providers that make extravagant promises of profits or book sales; operate under several different business names; or inflate their price tag with unnecessary additional services instead of offering à la carte options. Similar to the online forums mentioned above, some of these self-publishing companies will sponsor "free" contests that are lead-generation devices for aggressive marketing campaigns, or worse. Copyright your manuscript before submitting, it to reduce the risk of piracy.
The Poets Literary Agency - Avoid
We feel this site is a bad deal for poets because it misrepresents how the poetry publishing market works. Reputable publishing houses use contests and open submission periods to find new poets. The use of agents is very rare. The trade shows and mass mailings that Poets Literary Agency mentions may be valuable for commercial nonfiction but are not a normal publicity channel for poetry. Moreover, their critique fee (reported to be $74 as of October 2006) is suspiciously high, especially when it's not obvious that the staff has any literary (as opposed to marketing) credentials.
Phishing Schemes
Scammers have been targeting writers with fake invitations to conferences, purporting to be sponsored by major publishers such as Macmillan. The speaking engagement "contract" tricks writers into sending money or disclosing personal data. Read more about these scams and how to avoid them in this 2022 article by Kevin Larimer for Poets & Writers.
High-Priced Book Promotion Services
Poets and other small press authors should be on the lookout for marketing schemes that charge high fees for book publicity services of dubious value. Winning Writers newsletter editor Jendi Reiter, author of the poetry collection A Talent for Sadness (Turning Point Books, 2003), recently received a mass-mailed sales pitch from Airleaf Publishing & Book Selling. Headed "A National Campaign for A Talent for Sadness!", the letter purported to be a "special invitation" to participate in a national publicity campaign, including television commercials, full-color glossy newspaper inserts, interviews on local radio shows, and telemarketing calls encouraging bookstores to stock her book. All for the rock-bottom price of…$6,996.
While overpriced publicity services are nothing new, we felt this personalized letter crossed an ethical line by creating a false appearance of selectivity. "We recently discovered A Talent for Sadness and we believe it has the potential to be a national bestseller. Your book comes highly recommended and is precisely the kind of book we have had the most success selling." Well, gee. We'd like to think so, but poetry books that aren't written by pop stars or ex-presidents rarely achieve that level of commercial success. The total mismatch between these extravagant promises and the type of book being promoted makes us very suspicious of Airleaf's claim that "we have invited a very select group of authors and are accepting just the first 25." More likely they generated a letter like this for everyone on their mailing list who had a book out.
Even leaving aside the dishonesty, we feel services like these are generally not a good investment. It's better to do your targeted research on the bookstores, local radio and TV stations, and performance spaces that would be most appropriate for promoting your book, instead of wasting money on mass-mailing to markets that aren't appropriate for you. For far less money than Airleaf is charging, you can hire an assistant to help you schedule readings and network with booksellers if you don't have time to do everything yourself. Pick up a copy of Carolyn Howard-Johnson's The Frugal Book Promoter for some creative ideas.
Zimbo Books
We received a promotional email from this company in October 2008 for the Zimbo Books Fiction Competition 2008:
Zimbo Books is pleased to announce the Zimbo Books Fiction Competition 2008 commemorating the launch of Zimbo Books. This exciting competition as described in the competition rules has 2 major benefits:
* A prize pool of USD 100,000 with the first prize of $80,000.
The next four runners-up get $5,000 each.
* One year's subscription for all Authors to sell their books online via Zimbo Books (value $45).
The closing date of Registration for the Competition is 21 April 2009. The registration fee is USD 85 per entry. Authors can enter more than one book.
Such big dollar amounts for a literary contest should be the first tip-off that something is amiss. Add in the fact that the entry fee is unusually high, and the sponsor has no literary track record, and this starts to look like a contest to avoid, even if no deception is involved. I was also concerned that the sponsor never responded to my email asking for more details about the rules.
We asked our Australian affiliate, John H. Reid, for feedback on this Australia-based publisher and their contest terms. John observed that even if it's a genuine contest, "it has a 99.9% chance of failure. This type of PDF marketing has been tried before and has failed every time.
"Lulu and quite a few other USA publishers have a PDF or download marketing division, but it's mostly window dressing. Only one in a thousand sales are PDF downloads. And once bitten, twice shy. A reader who does this once is unlikely to return. The disadvantages are too great.
"And the whole idea of a contest with a whopping big prize and a whopping big entry fee has been tried before many times. All have failed dismally. At $85 they would be extremely lucky to get 100 entries. But even if they received 1,000 they are still in the red."
John also found this suspicious clause buried in their multi-page rules: "In the event, an insufficient number of entries are received, Zimbo Books reserves the right to cancel the Competition and shall be under no obligation to award the prizes, but will refund $40 of the [$85] Registration Fee to the author's Zimbo account." Thus, the whole enterprise could well be a scam to generate non-refundable entry fees.
The lessons: Read the fine print, and if a prize seems too big to be real, it probably is.
Character Building Counts Book Awards
The name and URL of the "CBC Book Awards" appear designed to create confusion between this contest and the much more reputable and prestigious CBC Literary Awards from the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation. The Character-Building Counts Book Awards charge an above-average entry fee of $85, with no cash prize. Instead, winners are promised such nebulous benefits as "potential increased sales and income" and a "professional press release sent to thousands of TV, radio, and print media outlets". Moreover, the site contains no information about the judges or the sponsoring organization, and the link to past winners does not work. For a contest that supposedly rewards books with "character-building messages", the organizers are curiously lacking in transparency.
Check their site out for their list of free legit contests -it is updated frequently.
And writers beware is also a great site to go to for scam research. When in doubt do a thorough search, google, and check winning writers and writers beware.
And if you get unsolicited offers to publish, that is almost always a scam. Once you start submitting the fraudsters will pounce like sharks when they smell fresh blood.
MODPO
MOD PO is a free coursea course on modern poetry. It is open all year round but the symposium version is offered in the fall.
Dear jake aller & all MoD Po people everywhere:
To those ModPo'ers who have joined us recently: I urge you to explore all the materials and guides you can find by clicking "Resources" on the left-side menu of any ModPo page - and also to contact us at modpo@writing.upenn.edu if you have any questions about the course or about navigating our site.

As you know, we begin our annual 10-week run together through the syllabus on September 3, 2022. The course is open and available all year but this upcoming ten-week session we call our "symposium mode." Plan to join us even if by then you will have been through the course on your own or joined for previous symposia.

Today I want to tell you about two things:
1. We've added Frost's "Birches" to ModPoPLUS. This includes a rare 1936 recording of Frost performing the poem. And it includes a new "on location" video in which Laynie Browne and I, along with Stephen Metcalf (host of the Slate Culture Gabfest), walk through a birch forest in the Catskills while discussing this poem. Expert audio was managed by Chris Martin, while, walking backward, Zach Carduner handled the camera with our new fabulous "steady-cam" harness. Watch the results! See the links below.
2. A group of devoted ModPo citizens has formed another SloPo discussion group. They have been reading and talking about long poems, most recently Wallace Stevens's "serial" poem titled "An Ordinary Evening in New Haven." They are about to begin discussing John Ashbery's "Self-Portrait in a Convex Mirror." John Fadely from this group tells me this: "We'll meet weekly on Zoom for 1 to 1.5 hours per session on Saturday mornings (Eastern time)." If you are interested in joining this group, or if you are merely interested in finding out more, go HERE.
Consistently yours,
 - Al Filreis
**
from ModPoPLUS:
FROST'S "BIRCHES"
5.1 read Robert Frost's "Birches": LINK TO TEXT
5.2 listen to Frost recite "Birches": LINK TO AUDIO
5.3 watch "on location" discussion of "Birches": LINK TO VIDEO [OFFSITE COPY]
Go to course
Other useful sites and resources

All poetry
www.allpoetry.com
Another large site costs $5 a month but the free option is okay. If you choose the free option every time you post you have to review other works. And can become fans of their work. I have over 500 followers. I also link my web page on my poetry submissions which so far they have allowed.
And you can post your posts on your blog. Note some professionals might consider this to be a bit of a scam as they don't turn anyone back except for promoting racism etc. more of a social media site than a poetry publication site but still lots of people post there and get something out of it.
They do have a self-publishing option which I have not done yet.
Poetry soup
www. Poetrysoup.com
similar to all poetry but seems more professional. You can post up to ten per day. You have to choose which form your poem is but their descriptions are pretty good. I usually opt for free verse or haiku. But they have lots of choices and lots of examples.
Poetry magnum opus
Similar to poetry soup - seems more professional and I am moving towards using their services more.
Other sites I submit to from time to time include:
Cosmosfunnel 3 items per session
Hello Poetry individual postings
Moontown Facebook page individual postings
Poem Hunter individual postings
Poetry Nook individual postings
Poetry Super highway Facebook page individual postings
Facebook
Various Facebook groups including individual postings
My groups
Family
State department
Berkeley High school zoom
Berkeley High school

Contemporary Poets
Calls for submission
Writers Unite
Poetic license bureau
Worldwide poetry
Love poetry and thoughts
Verse virtual
Writer's ignite
Artistic poetry
The poet's corner
Sunrise poetry garden
Structural poetry
Poetry within life
Poetry
Passion of poetry
Poetry out loud
Poetry family
Poetry for the soul
Writers café
For Facebook postings don't post more than 20 sites at a time otherwise you might get a spam alert notice.
The general rule of thumb here and on these other sites is to post each poem or story separately and no more than ten per day. Fan story limits you to two per 24-hour period. And they charge you per posting but you can earn fan story credits by reviewing items. I usually review between five to ten per session then enter one or two contests and then post something I just posted on writing com or have had published.
April Poetry Madness
NaPoWriMo, Poetry superhighway, individual postings, and writing com all participate in the annual April poetry madness competition. You can see my 2022 entries on my blog.

Poetry Superhighway contests
Poetry Superhighway does a weekly open mike zoom call-in, an annual poetry contest, and once a yea
r poetry chapbook exchange. You can see my chapbook here
A good rule of thumb is you should post things the same day every week. You should update your blog once a week, copy the blog entry to medium, substack, Wattpad, and writing com afterward, and post five to ten items daily on each of the sites you decide to post to. For me, I post daily at writing com and fan story, and once a week to All poetry, poetry soup, and every other week to the other sites. Another rule of thumb is only to post items you have already posted in your blog, on your sites, or have been published because you need to reserve at least half of your work as "unpublished". In other words, cross-posts everywhere. It is expected. Finally, join Facebook writing clubs and link to writing communities. Those are great places to get feedback and exposure. Add a link to each submission if it is allowed. Some groups don't allow links, others only once a week, and others are okay with it.

Final Site Lit Mag Review
3 Ways to Get Started: Lit Mag Advice for Newbies, From a Newbie
Writer new to submitting shares insights and experience
Becky Tuch
May 26
Welcome to our weekly column offering perspectives on lit mag publishing, with contributions from readers, writers, and editors all over the world.
________________________________________
By Lily Anderson
"[Author Name]'s work can be found in…"
Author bios from sites like this to the backs of novels are often full of listed publications, which, when I read them, can contribute to a suffocating web of self-doubt. This industry can be overwhelming, and the "you've gotta start somewhere!" mantra is wildly unhelpful when you have no idea where to start. Where can my work be found? Where do I want it to be found? I have short fiction, poems, and essays to share, but where do I even begin?
As a young writer fresh out of undergrad with no MFA lined up, I quickly began crafting my web of insecurity. I had work I wanted to see published, work I thought was good, but had no idea how to do so. The poorly crafted Instagram posts seen by four people weren't seeming to cut it.
Most of the podcasts I listened to and things I read provided advice on the writing process, navigating agents, and getting your book sold, but when it came to publishing short fiction, poetry, and submitting to contests, I found very little.
How was I supposed to share my short fiction, build a network, and (hopefully) get paid with absolutely no connections?
Lit mags, in all their glory, ended up serving as my entrance to the world of published writing. Perhaps more importantly, though, the countless submissions, the seemingly endless rejections, and the handful of acceptances have all contributed to building my confidence as a young writer.
Over the past eight months, I have spent about an hour a week researching literary magazines and submitting pieces of my writing. The three tips below illustrate a process I have found to be efficient and beneficial in building your publication list as a young writer. In a way, I am addressing this article to myself eight months ago - it is chock-full of the things I wish I had known right away.
1. INDIE MAGS, BABY!
As many of us do, I often find myself romanticizing the idea of being a real writer, whatever that means, more than I should. This was particularly counter-productive when I first started submitting to literary magazines, as time carved out for sending out my work was spent daydreaming about the inevitable, glorious acceptance email from The New Yorker I was waiting on.
Spoiler alert - still haven't heard back from them.
This is not to say you shouldn't submit to the large, established publications you love and daydream about. You still should! However, don't be like me and rule out smaller, independent magazines just because they don't fit your aesthetic, daydreamed direction. I wanted my resumé to contain only the flashiest of flashy publications, but I soon realized the magic in many, many indie mags.
There are many pros to submitting to smaller publications. In my experience, the response time is often faster, and the editors engage with your work kindly and constructively. I have found them to not only accept, but encourage unpublished and young writers. The anxiety-inducing "her writing appears in" has yet to be a barrier! There is such a wide variety of magazines, from genre-specific ones (fantasy, romance, horror, etc.) to those that publish anything and everything.
I utilize Duotrope to find these magical independent gems. For $5 a month, you have access to quite an impressive database full of magazines accepting submissions. Duotrope's filtering abilities make it very simple - you can weed publications out by their payment status if they accept simultaneous submissions, what genres they like, and oh so many more. I typically utilize three or four filters when I am searching and go through the massive list alphabetically. After over one hundred submissions, I have barely scratched the "E"s.
2. CONTESTS (through lit mags)!
Many literary magazines run contests in conjunction with their typical publications. They exist for everything from a poem to short stories to an essay, and there is often some serious money involved. I have personally enjoyed submitting flash fiction. Some are general and have very loose requirements, while others have specific, often ridiculously zany, prompts. I have seen everything from a 10-word story to a poem about a pendulum.
While it is unlikely you will already have something written that fits the wackier requirements, these prompts can be great creative constraints. Plus, you can always submit what you write to other publications if you are rejected.
I would be remiss if I didn't mention the fantastic blogger Erica Verrillo of "Curiosity Never Killed the Writer," who links free contests, magazines accepting submissions, and many more resources in her posts. She does this in an accessible, organized manner that I look forward to every single month.
3. SPREADSHEET IT!
Staying organized throughout this process is crucial. Months often pass between the time you submitted your piece and when you hear back from the magazine. If you are accepted, add another few months for it to be published. If you are submitting to roughly twenty magazines a month, it can become quite challenging to stay on top of everything without some sort of system.
The spreadsheet I use - a basic Microsoft Excel document - helps me stay on top of things. I note the date, magazine name, piece, and whether or not I should return to it later for every single submission. When I am accepted or rejected, I mark that down, too.
My spreadsheet also helps me notify magazines when a piece I submitted has been accepted elsewhere. Most publications require you to indicate if your piece is a simultaneous submission, or if you are submitting it elsewhere. Sending a quick email to withdraw your piece, or removing it yourself if the magazine has some form of submissions portal, is a kindness (and a mandate, in many cases), that I have been told makes editors' lives much easier. The great people who staff the magazines I submit to have certainly appreciated when I do this. Once, when I told a magazine my piece had been accepted elsewhere they emailed and asked for more of my writing, and ended up accepting something else. You never know.
The world of literary magazines can be ridiculously intimidating, but the payoffs (financial, emotional, and professional) make every little action taken worth it.
Like most things in life, having people to talk to, share contests and cool magazines with, and share creative work has been such a blessing in this crazy world of publication. I am active on a Discord server called "the word garden," which I encourage absolutely everyone who enjoys writing to join. Publication resources, contests, challenges, and just about anything writing-related are discussed and nurtured there.
Wonderful magazines and communities like "the word garden" hold my hand as I come closer and closer to feeling like a real author. The ever daunting author bio still induces a bit of anxiety in me. But, utilizing the advice I laid out here, I no longer have a blank space after "her work can be found in…"
It can be so easy, at least for me, to stew in my creativity and fixate on the idea that nobody may ever read my words. Independent lit mags have yanked me away from that web of insecurity.

Four additional great resources,

I copy my blog postings to blog lovin, medium, substack, and writing.com. Medium, substack, and Wattpad have a paid version where you receive 1 dollar for every time anyone reads your work but unfortunately only works in the U.S. and you have to pay 50 dollars per year to activate it.

________________________________________
Literary Mama is another great market resource
CONTESTS

________________________________________
1729 Book Prize in Prose - novels, novellas, story collections, memoirs, auto/biographies, essay collections - 7/15
42 Miles Press - poetry manuscripts - 6/15
Bellevue Literary Review - poem, short story, essays about health, healing, illness, the body, and the mind - 7/15
Blue Mountain Arts Poetry Contest - poetry - 6/30
Cincinnati Review Robert and Adele Schiff Awards - poetry, literary nonfiction, fiction - 7/15
Finishing Line Press Women's Chapbook Competition - poetry - 9/15
Housatonic Book Awards - fiction, nonfiction, poetry, and young adult/middle grade published in 2021–6/13.
Literary Taxidermy Writing Competition - short stories, poetry - 7/11
Los Angeles Review Literary Awards - poetry, short story, essay - 6/30
Narrative Prize for new and emerging writers - short story, novel excerpt, poetry, one-act play, graphic story, literary nonfiction - 6/15
Narrative Spring 2022 Story Contest - fiction, essays, memoirs, photo essays, graphic stories, literary nonfiction - 7/31
Narrative Poetry Contest - poetry - 7/15
Rattle Poetry Prize - poetry - 7/15
________________________________________
ANTHOLOGIES
________________________________________
Bell Press Books - nonfiction, poetry about Rituals or Framework of the Human Body - 6/15
Brigids Gate Press Dangerous Waters Anthology - stories, poems, and drabbles about malevolent mermaids, sinister sirens, scary selkies, spirits, and other deadly and dangerous women of the sea - 6/30
"Standing Up" - An Anthology in Support of Ukraine - true nonfiction stories, poetry - 6/15
Toxic Workplaces Anthology - Women's Writing Workshop - Nonfiction - 12/1
________________________________________
UPCOMING DEADLINES
Chicken Soup for the Soul - various topics and deadlines in June and July
Creative Nonfiction - currently seeking true stories by (or about) nurses - 6/27
Creative Nonfiction - also currently seeking short nonfiction for Sunday Short Read - 8/1
HerStry Traveling Women Series - personal essay - 7/1
Isele Magazine - fiction, nonfiction, poetry, photography, visual art, and hybrid works that explore the freedom, euphoria, and serenity in the queer existence - 6/30
Fairy Tale Review - queer fairy-tale poetry and prose written by writers who self-identify as LGBTQIA+ - 6/30
❤️ Farmerish - creative nonfiction, personal essays, expository essays, instructional, farmer profiles, recipes, book reviews, poetry - 6/14
The Maine Review - nonfiction, fiction, poetry - 7/31
McNeese Review - poetry, fiction, nonfiction - 8/31
❤️ Mom Egg Review - Poetry, Fiction, Creative Prose, Hybrid, Visual Art - 7/15
Mud Season Review - poetry, creative nonfiction, fiction, art - 6/30
Roxane Gay's The Audacity Emerging Writers Series - literary essay, memoir - open until 24 essays accepted
Threadcount - prose, poetry, fiction, nonfiction, and hybrid text - 6/30
Whale Road Review - poetry, short prose - 6/30
________________________________________
ROLLING SUBMISSIONS
32 Poems - Poetry, Reviews
The Acentos Review - Poetry, Fiction, Nonfiction, Translation, Cross-Genre, Art
After The Art - Essays on Art
Afternoon Visitor - Poetry, Visual Poetry, Hybrid, Visual Art
AGNI - Poetry and Prose
Agony Opera - Fiction, Flash Fiction, Poetry, Hybrid
Always Crashing - Poetry, Fiction, Collage, Video, Audio, Hybrid, Other
The American Journal of Poetry - Poetry - $5 fee
Animal Literary Magazine - Nonfiction, Fiction, Poetry, Art
Another New Calligraphy - Books, Music
Anti-Heroin Chic - Poetry, Fiction, Nonfiction, Art
Apartment Poetry - Poetry
Assay - Critical Nonfiction
The Aunt Flo Project - Poetry, Fiction, Nonfiction, and Flash About Menstruation
Auroras and Blossoms - Poetry, Flash Fiction, Essays, Short Stories, Paintings, Drawings, Photography
Balloons Literary Journal - Poetry, Fiction, Art, Photography
Baobab Press - Nonfiction, Fiction, Poetry, Graphic Narrative, Children's Books
Birdcoat Quarterly - Poetry, Nonfiction / Fee: $3
Biscuit Root Drive - Poetry, Fiction, Nonfiction, Art
BlazeVOX [books] - Poetry, Fiction, Nonfiction, Literary Criticism
Bosphorus Review of Books - Fiction, Nonfiction, Poetry, Book Reviews
Braided Way - Nonfiction, Fiction, Poetry, Photography
Brittle Paper - Fiction, Poetry, Creative Nonfiction, Book reviews, Essays, Literary Commentaries, Fun Listicles,
The Carolina Quarterly - Poetry, Fiction, Nonfiction, Art
Cicada Magazine - Poetry, Fiction, Nonfiction
❤️ Chicago Parent - Nonfiction
The Coachella Review - Blog, Poetry, Fiction, Nonfiction, Drama
The Concrete Desert Review - Children's Poetry and Stories, Art
Cooper Dillon Books - Poetry
Counterpath Press - Queries
Creative Nonfiction - Pitches for writing about writing
Damaged Goods Press - Poetry, Essays, and Hybrid Writing from Queer and Trans Writers
The Decadent Review - Criticism, Reviews, Essays
Deep Vellum Publishing - Poetry, Fiction, Nonfiction, Translations
Disorder Press - Poetry, Fiction, Nonfiction
Divergents Magazine - Poetry, Nonfiction, Photography, Art from the Neuro-Divergent Community
Expanded Field - Poetry, Fiction, Nonfiction, Comics, Experiments
The Fictional Cafe - Fiction, Poetry, Art
Flash Fiction Online - Fantasy, Horror, Science Fiction, Mainstream, Literary, Horror, Seasonal, Other
The Forge - Fiction, Nonfiction
Golden Walkman - Poetry, Fiction, Nonfiction, Critical Essays, Music
Greying Ghost Press- Pamphlet and Art Zine Submissions - Nonfiction, Art
Hindsight - Nonfiction, Pandemic-related
HerKind Collective - Articles, Essays
HerStry - Nonfiction
❤️ Her View From Home - Nonfiction
❤️ Hip Mama - Articles, Art
The Kalahari Review - Poetry, Fiction, Nonfiction, Personal Essay, Photography, Visual Art - etc. that explores modern Africa and Africans, including from the Diaspora
Kiddiepunk - Zines and Books
Kernpunkt - Books, Novellas
Lavender Review - Poetry, Art
Lily Poetry Review - Poetry
The Literary Bohemian - Poetry, Postcard Prose (❤50 words), Visual Poetry / Prose
LitMag - Fiction, Poetry, Nonfiction
Litmus Press - Proposals for Translations
Malahat Review - Poetry, Short Fiction, and Creative Nonfiction
Mediterranean Poetry - Poetry/Prose inspired in some way or the other by the Mediterranean world
Minola - Poetry, Fiction, Nonfiction
The Missouri Review - Poetry, Fiction, Nonfiction
❤️ MOPS Blogs - Nonfiction
The Moth - Short Fiction, Poetry
❤️ Motherly - Essays, Videos
❤️ Motherwell - Weekly Columns
❤️ Mutha Magazine - Nonfiction
Mystery Weekly - Fiction
Narrative - fiction, poetry, personal essays, humor, sketches, memoirs, literary biographies, commentary
Narratively - Nonfiction, Photography
New Readers Magazine - Fiction, Poetry, Articles, Art
Northwest Review - Art, Translation, Poetry, Nonfiction, Fiction - $3 fee
Outpost 19 - Fiction, Nonfiction, Hybrid
PANK - Poetry, Fiction, Nonfiction, Hybrid
Peacock Journal - Poetry, Fiction, Nonfiction, Art, Translation, Music
Pillow Talking - creative nonfiction stories of real-life bedroom conversations
Pithead Chapel - Art, Fiction, Nonfiction, Poetry
Ploughshares - Fiction, Nonfiction
Poor Yorick - Digital Video Shorts, Photo Essays, Art, Fiction, Nonfiction, Poetry
Pretty Owl Poetry - Poetry, Visual Art
❤️ Raising Mothers - BIWOC and Non-Binary Parents of Color - Nonfiction, Fiction, Poetry, Interviews, Book Reviews, Graphic Narrative
The Revolution Relaunch - Poetry, Fiction, Nonfiction, Art
Shift: A Journal of Literary Oddities - Fiction, Nonfiction, Poetry, Oddities
Sky Island Journal - Poetry, Fiction, Nonfiction
Smokelong - Flash Fiction, Art, Blog
Spuyten Duyvil - Poetry, Nonfiction, Fiction
Storm Cellar - Art, Nonfiction, Flash, Poetry
The Sun Magazine - personal essays, fiction, and poetry
The Sunlight Press - Nonfiction, Fiction, Poetry, Reviews, Craft, Photography
Surfaces - Poetry, Fiction, Nonfiction, Theory, Art, Text Collage
Sweet Lit - Poetry, Graphic Nonfiction
Throwback Books - Novelettes
Tupelo Press - Nonfiction
Typishly - Poetry, Fiction, Flash Fiction - $5 fee
Under the Gum Tree - Nonfiction, Art
Vegetarian Alcohol Press - Poetry, Nonfiction, Fiction, Drama
Vessel - Poetry, Nonfiction, Fiction
❤️ Verily– Nonfiction
Wildness - Poetry, Fiction, Nonfiction
Willow Springs - Nonfiction - $3 fee
WordMothers - Guest Posts
The Woven Tale Press - Art, Poetry, Fiction, Nonfiction
Writer's Digest - Nonfiction, Profiles, Memoir, Writing Advice, Children/Middle Grade/Young Adult
❤️ Yummy Mummy Club - Nonfiction
Zin Daily - Art, Poetry, Nonfiction, Fiction
That's it for the free advice. Hit me up if you have any concerns or wish to add to the list of useful sites.
The best free contests through January 31 |
Have trouble viewing this email? View the web version.
We found almost five dozen excellent free poetry and prose contests with deadlines between December 15-January 31. In this issue, we revisit an old favorite, T.S. Eliot's "The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock", illustrated by Julian Peters.
Open at Winning Writers, co-sponsored by Duotrope
WERGLE FLOMP HUMOR POETRY CONTEST - NO FEE
Free to enter, $3,500 in prizes, including a top award of $2,000. Judged by Jendi Reiter, assisted by Lauren Singer.
TOM HOWARD/JOHN H. REID FICTION & ESSAY CONTEST
$8,000 in prizes, including two top awards of $3,000 each. $20 entry fee. We are promoting Mina Manchester to be the final judge of this contest. Congratulations, Mina!
View past newsletters in our archives. Need assistance? Let us help. Join our 135,000 followers on Twitter. Advertise with us (buy your newsletter ads now, the price will increase from $150 to $175 on January 1).
Featured Sponsor
Last Call! Virginia Woolf Award for Short Fiction


First Prize: $2,500, publication in LitMag, and agency review
Finalists: Three finalists will receive $100 each
All finalists will be considered for possible agency review and publication.
Deadline: December 31
Contest Fee: $20. Entries must be unpublished short stories between 3,000 and 8,000 words. Submit through Submittable only. See the results of previous contests.
Contributors to LitMag include John Ashbery, Paul Auster, Elvis Bego, Harold Bloom, Jamel Brinkley, Blake Butler, Kelly Cherry, William H. Gass, Tony Kushner, Jhumpa Lahiri, Ange Mlinko, Kevin Moffett, Chinelo Okparanta, Sigrid Nunez, Charles Simic, Terese Svoboda, Justin Taylor, Corinna Vallianatos, Rosanna Warren, and more.
New! The Winning Writers Critique Service

For years people have asked us about getting critiques of their works. At last, we have a service for you!
Books and Manuscripts: $135
We have engaged contest judge and literary scholar Annie Mydla to provide expert private critiques of your books and manuscripts, published or unpublished, that have up to 200,000 words. Annie has read thousands of self-published books in her work as an assistant judge for our North Street Book Prize. She is also a published literary scholar whose works can be found in Avant Literary Journal, Joseph Conrad Today, and most recently in the international journal Świat I Słowo ("World and Word"). Learn more.
Poems, Stories, and Essays: $90
After a trial run in November, we are rolling out critiques of shorter works. We have set the price at $90 so we can prepare the kind of personalized critique that authors have found to be most helpful. Annie Myla and Lauren Singer are joining Tracy Koretsky so we can accommodate more orders. Learn more.
As always, we have set our pricing at or below that of leading competitors while aiming to provide superior service. We also guarantee your satisfaction. If our critique does not deliver value for you, you may request a prompt refund from adam@winningwriters.com.
Recent Honors and Publication Credits for Our Subscribers
Congratulations to Pamela Summers (featured poem: "This Time Last Year"), Hal Niedzviecki, Gary Greene (featured poem: "While I'm Sleeping"), Linda Neal (featured poem: "The New Amazon"), Rosanne Dingli (featured poem: "Flood Delusion"), Sally Bellerose, Joseph Stanton, Ruth Thompson, Rick Lupert, William Huhn, Dan Klefstad, Samantha Terrell, Eva Tortora, Joanie Holzer Schirm, and Kayleb Rae Candrilli.
Winning Writers Editor Jendi Reiter was interviewed for Trish Hopkinson's Tell Tell Poetry series in November. Watch the 30-minute video on Trish's writing opportunities blog.
Learn about our subscribers' achievements and see links to samples of their work.
Have news? Please email it to jendi@winningwriters.com.
Announcement
Ask Me Anything with ANNIE MYDLA, December 16, 12–2pm EST

Do you have questions about writing contests, journal submissions, promoting your work on social media, avoiding scams, locating resources for writers, or anything else on getting your work out there? From 12–2 pm Eastern US Time, Annie Myla, North Street Book Prize judge and moderator of r/literarycontests, the largest Reddit subreddit for submissions opportunities worldwide, will field questions on all topics, especially:
• Writing contests
• Journal submissions
• Mistakes to avoid while submitting your work
• Promoting your work on social media
• Partnering with other organizations to promote your work
• Avoiding scams
• The state of publishing/self-publishing today
• Locating the resources you need as a writer, poet, and/or self-publisher
There's no cost, so join us to ask questions, share your experiences in submissions and self-publishing, or just say hi!
Ad: HowToDoItFrugally with Carolyn Howard-Johnson

The frugal ticket for writing, editing, and marketing your books

"Nothing demonstrates professionalism like a well-edited submission. Follow Carolyn Howard-Johnson's clear, step-by-step editing approach for putting your best book forward and you'll submit like a pro." - Gregory A. Kompes, conference coordinator, Las Vegas Writer's Conference
"The Frugal Book Promoter. I love it. Most authors don't have deep pockets for publicity, promotion, and marketing; this is the kind of information we need! The chapter on the perks available on Amazon is a perfect example of the kind of practical advice offered - the kind that took me months to discover." - Rolf Gompertz, author, veteran publicist for NBC, and 30-year UCLA Extension instructor in marketing
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Ad: Submit Your Book Manuscript to Atmosphere Press

Atmosphere authors have sold thousands of books across five continents, received starred or featured reviews with Publisher's Weekly, Kirkus, and Booklist, and have even appeared on a giant billboard in Times Square. The atmosphere has had books with 1,000+ first-month sales in four different genres, and their Author Connect program unites their authors with each other like no other press. And they're just getting started.
Atmosphere Press currently seeks great manuscripts, and they'll be the publisher you've always wanted: attentive, organized, on schedule, and professional. They use a model in which the author funds the initial publication of the book, but retains 100% rights, royalties, and artistic autonomy. From an exceptional editorial team through book design and into promotion, partnering with Atmosphere is the way to do your book right.
So, send your manuscript their way. Submissions are free and open to everyone and in all genres.
Ad: Last Call! Oprelle's 2021 Holiday "COMING HOME" Poetry Contest

Deadline: December 20
What does home look like to you? Is it an old farmhouse, a certain person, a childhood bedroom, a river you run to? Think about when you feel most rooted. Where in the world do you feel most at peace, most yourself? Write a poem that takes us there with you.
A home doesn't have to be a building with four walls. It can be a state of being. We want to know what exactly "home" means to you!
• First Prize: $200, a poem published on oprelle.com, certificate
• Second Prize: $100 and a certificate
• Third Prize: $50 and a certificate
The contest is open to anyone age 14 and up who writes poetry. Parents and guardians may submit on behalf of children who are 14–17. Each poem must have 1–20 lines (220 words maximum). Entry fee: $15 per poem. Submit up to two entries. Judge: Susan (Manchin) Dines. Learn more and submit via Submittable or by mail.
Ad: Last Call! Two Sylvias Press WILDER POETRY BOOK PRIZE for Women Over 50

Deadline: December 31
Attention Women Poets:
Two Sylvias Press is looking to publish Full-Length Poetry Manuscripts by Women Over 50
(Open to both established and emerging poets)
Prize: $1,000 and print book publication by Two Sylvias Press, 20 copies of the winning book, and a vintage art nouveau pendant
The Wilder Series Poetry Book Prize is open to women over 50 years of age (born on or before December 31, 1971). Women submitting manuscripts may be poets with one or more previously published chapbooks/books or poets without any prior chapbook/book publications. (We use an inclusive definition of "woman" and "female" and we welcome trans women, genderqueer women, and non-binary people who are significantly female-identified.) All manuscripts will be considered for publication. See the complete contest guidelines.
Learn more about the prize and Two Sylvias Press. Previous winners & manuscripts chosen for the Wilder Poetry Book Prize include Michelle Bitting, Gail Martin, Kelly Cressio-Moeller, Erica Bodwell, Adrian Blevins, Dana Roeser, Molly Tenenbaum, and Carmen Gillespie.
Simultaneous submissions are allowed.
NOTE: Our mission at Two Sylvias Press is to support poets. Your manuscript will NOT be disqualified if it was submitted incorrectly. We will not penalize you for trying and making a mistake. If we have a question or concern about your manuscript format, we will contact you and allow you to resubmit. Please know that we are on your side. Thank you for trusting us with your work.
Ad: Discovery Poetry Contest
The Joan Leiman Jacobson Poetry Prizes
Deadline: January 11, 2022, 5 pm Eastern US Standard Time
For over 60 years 92Y's Discovery Contest has launched the careers of major poets like John Ashbery, Lucille Clifton, Mark Strand, Larry Levis, Mary Jo Bang, Solmaz Sharif, and Diana Khoi Nguyen, to name but a few. Will you be next?
The contest is open to poets who have not published a full-length poetry collection. Submit one entry of up to 10 pages of poems. At least two of the poems must be one page or shorter. Include a cover letter and a $15 entry fee.
Four winners receive a reading at 92Y, publication in The Paris Review Daily, a two-night residency at the ACE Hotel, and $500 each. Winners will be contacted by telephone in April 2022; all contest entrants will be emailed the names of the winners shortly thereafter.
The 2022 preliminary judges are Sumita Chakraborty and Timothy Donnelly. The final judges are Victoria Chang, Brian Teare, and Philip B. Williams.
Read selections by last year's winners: Kenzie Allen, Ina Cariño, Mag Gabbert, and Alexandra Zukerman.
To apply, please follow the complete guidelines and submit them here.
This contest is endowed by Joan L. and Dr. Julius H. Jacobson, II.
Ad: Last Call! Lilith Magazine Annual Fiction Contest (no fee)

Deadline extended to January 15, 2022
Calling all gifted fiction writers! Lilith Magazine - Independent, Jewish & frankly feminist - seeks quality short fiction full of heart, soul, and chutzpah, 3,000 words or under, for our Annual Fiction Contest. The first prize is $250 and publication. We especially like working with both feminist and Jewish content and are eager to read submissions from writers of color and emerging writers of any age.
Please submit to info@Lilith.org with "Fiction Contest" and your name in the subject line and full contact information on your manuscript.
No fee to enter. Please mention you saw our ad in the Winning Writers newsletter.
Ad: Rattle Chapbook Prize

Deadline: January 15, 2022
The annual Rattle Chapbook Prize gives poets something truly special. Every year, three winners will each receive $5,000 cash, 500 contributor copies, and distribution to Rattle's ~8,000 subscribers. In a world where a successful full-length poetry book might sell 1,000 copies, the winning book will reach an audience eight times as large on its release day alone - an audience that includes many other literary magazines, presses, and well-known poets. This will be a chapbook to launch a career.
And maybe the best part is this: The $25 entry fee is just a standard subscription to Rattle, which includes four issues of the magazine and the winning chapbook, even if it isn't yours. Rattle is one of the most-read literary journals in the world - find out why just by entering! For more information, visit our website.
We congratulate our three winners from our 2021 contest:
• Gil Arzola, The Death of a Migrant Worker (September 2021)
• Amanda Newell, I Will Pass Even to Acheron (December 2021)
• Elizabeth Ambrose Johnston, Imago, Dei (March 2022)
Please enjoy a poem from Amanda Newell's winning chapbook, just published this month:
Stoic
When I see how swollen and purple it is
and how the skin, like a film of dried glue,
stretches over the bones
of his foot - so clearly now not a foot,
curled as it is like a parenthesis,
already half-afterthought - I wonder if it would be
less painful if it crumbled
onto his white sheets like rain-soaked wood
since it's just one limb
and no longer, he says, any good to him.
Ad: The DISQUIET Literary Prize

Deadline: January 24, 2022
Submit now to the DISQUIET Literary Prize! This contest is for writing in fiction, nonfiction, or poetry by a writer who has not yet published more than one book with a major press. The first prize winners in each genre will be published:
• the fiction winner in Granta.com
• the nonfiction winner in Ninthletter.com
• the poetry winner in The Common
One grand prize winner will receive a full scholarship including tuition, lodging, and a $1,000 travel stipend to Lisbon in 2022 (June 26-July 8). Genre winners will receive a $500 cash prize in addition to publication. Reading fee: $15.
Read the full contest guidelines and enter at Submittable.
Ad: 2022 William Saroyan International Prize for Writing
Entries must be received by January 31, 2022
Submissions are now being accepted for the 10th William Saroyan International Prize for Writing. Two prizes of $5,000 each are given for works of fiction and nonfiction. The awards, co-sponsored by Stanford Libraries and the William Saroyan Foundation, are intended to encourage new or emerging writers and honor the Saroyan legacy of originality, vitality, and stylistic innovation.
Submit five copies of your work published between January 1, 2020, and December 31, 2021, with a $50 entry fee by January 31, 2022. Writers who have published four or more books are ineligible. Visit the Saroyan Prize website for complete eligibility and submission details.
Congratulations to our 2020 Fiction Winner Nana Kwame Adjei-Brenyah for Friday Black, and our 2020 Nonfiction Winner Jennifer Croft for Homesick. View our complete list of 2020 winners and finalists.
Ad: On The Premises Short Story Contest (no fee)
Deadline: Friday, March 4, 2022, 11:59 pm Eastern US Standard Time
Last time we checked, 77% of web-based fiction magazines pay their fiction writers nothing.
So did 60% of print-only fiction magazines!
If you'd like to try getting paid for your fiction, why not consider us? Since 2006, On The Premises magazine, has aimed to promote newer and/or relatively unknown writers who can write creative, compelling stories told in effective, uncluttered, and evocative prose. We've never charged a reading fee or publication fee, and we pay between $75 and $250 for short stories that fit each issue's broad story premise. We publish stories in nearly every genre (literary/realist, mystery, light/dark fantasy, light/hard sci-fi, slipstream) aimed at readers older than 12 (no children's fiction).
The premise of our 39th contest is "Arrival". For this contest, write a well-crafted story between 1,000 and 5,000 words long in which… IN THE FIRST SENTENCE… one or more characters arrive at a location and find something unexpected. Remember, this action has to happen in the story's first sentence!
Any genre except children's fiction, exploitative sex, or over-the-top gross-out horror is fine. We will not accept parodies of another author's specific fictional characters or world(s). We will accept serious literary drama, crazy farces, and any variation of science fiction and fantasy you can imagine. Read our past issues and see!
You can find details and instructions for submitting your story here. To be informed when new contests are launched, subscribe to our free, short, monthly newsletter.
"On The Premises" magazine is recognized in Duotrope, Writer's Market, Ralan.com, the Short Story and Novel Writers guidebooks, and other short story marketing resources.
Ad: Three Funerals for My Father by Jolie Phuong Hoang

From the author of Anchorless, winner of the 2020 North Street Book Prize for Literary Fiction
What would you risk to save your children?
Jolie Hoang grew up as one of ten children, part of a loving, prosperous Vietnamese family. All that changed when the communists took over in 1975; the family lived in constant fear of being sent to the dreaded "new economic zone". Desperate to ensure the family's safety and to provide a future for his children, Jolie's father arranged three separate escapes. The first was a failure that cost most of their fortune, but the second was successful - six of his children reached Indonesia and ultimately settled in Canada. He and his youngest daughter drowned during the disastrous third attempt.
Jolie Hoang's escape and the aftermath, which included nine days on a boat and 14 months in an Indonesian refugee camp before coming to Canada, was left out of Anchorless because her father wasn't there. However, in Three Funerals for My Father, she shares the harrowing story.
Alternately told from the author's perspective and that of her father's ghost, Three Funerals for My Father is a poignant story of love, grief, and resilience that spans three countries and fifty years. It is an intimate story of one family, a testament to the collective experience of the "boat people" who escaped communist Vietnam, and a plea on behalf of the millions of refugees currently seeking asylum across the globe.
"This is a story of familial love in its purest and finest form…a modern classic…should be required reading in any secondary school."
 - Alexander McGlashan, 5-star Goodreads review
Buy now from Tidewater Press, Amazon, and other fine booksellers worldwide.
Ad: Jendi Reiter's Two Natures: "Engaging and Real"

Recent 5-star reviews on Amazon are praising Jendi Reiter's debut novel Two Natures as "engaging and real" and "a very satisfying read [that] goes to the roots of human nature". Winner of the Rainbow Award for Best Gay Contemporary Fiction, Two Natures is the spiritual coming-of-age story of an NYC fashion photographer during the 1990s AIDS crisis.
Read an excerpt from the novel.
Buy it now at Saddle Road Press.
Spotlight Contests (no fee)
Some contests are best suited to writers at the early stages of their careers. Others are better for writers with numerous prizes and publications to their credit. Here is this month's selection of Spotlight Contests for your consideration:
Emerging Writers
Ezra Jack Keats Children's Book Award. The University of Southern Mississippi will award $5,000 in the New Writer and New Illustrator categories for published picture books that portray the universal qualities of childhood, a strong and supportive family, and the multicultural nature of our world. Books must have been first published in North America and the English language. Authors may be of any nationality. Winners must attend a ceremony at the University of Southern Mississippi to receive the award. No self-published titles. Only original stories qualify for the New Writer award; no folktales or retellings. The publisher must send 11 copies of the book for consideration to the various addresses specified on the sponsor's website. Due December 31.
Intermediate Writers
Neil Postman Award for Metaphor. Rattle will award $2,000 for the best use of metaphor in a poem published in the journal. Submissions are accepted year-round. Send up to 4 unpublished poems, of any length. Wait for a decision on your first entry before submitting more. All poems published in Rattle in a given year are automatically considered for this award. No separate application process. Due December 31 (rolling deadline).
Advanced Writers
Four Quartets Prize. The Poetry Society of America will award $21,000 for a unified and complete sequence of poems, 14 pages minimum, published in the US in a print or online journal, chapbook, or book during the current year. Self-published works are ineligible. Poet, publisher, or agent may send an entry form, four copies of the sequence of poems, and four copies of a paragraph-length statement describing its aims. Due December 31.
See more Spotlight Contests for emerging, intermediate, and advanced writers within The Best Free Literary Contests database.
Calls for Submissions
Winning Writers finds open submission calls and free contests in a variety of sources, including Erika Dreifus' Practicing Writer newsletter, FundsforWriters, Trish Hopkinson's blog, Erica Verrilli's blog, Authors Publish, Lambda Literary, Lit Mag News Roundup, Poets & Writers, The Writer, Duotrope, Submittable, and literary journals' newsletters and announcements.
• Clock house
(poetry, fiction, essays, drama - December 15)
• OpenDoor Magazine: "Alternatives" Issue
(poetry, stories, articles, artwork, or songs on this theme - December 15)
• Poetry Magazine: "Egophony" Issue
(poetry by non-native English speakers - December 16)
• letter
(women's first-person accounts including letters, prose poems, and journal entries - December 31)
• The Best New True Crime Stories: Crimes of the Famous and Infamous
(narrative journalism about celebrity crimes - January 1)
• Rain Fiction Pod: "Curiosity Killed the Cat"
(stories about an exciting discovery gone wrong - January 4)
• Abandoned Mine
(accessible poetry that makes an emotional impact - January 15)
• Flowers & Vortexes
(poetry and artwork - April 4)
PSA: The Gift of Literacy
Preliteracy, the largest adult literacy and basic education membership organization in the US, believes that a safer, stronger, and more sustainable society starts with an educated adult population. For more than 60 years, Preliteracy has been working across the globe to change lives and communities through the power of literacy.
"In the last year, I couldn't spell green," says Henry, an adult student. "If I saw a word like perfect I'd just pass it up. In the last eight months, I haven't had to ask for as much help. Reading changes lives. It makes you more responsible for your life. Not reading can hurt you."
Share the gift of literacy today.
Award-Winning Poems
THE KINDREDS
by Meredith Stricker
Winner of the 2020 Tupelo Press Dorset Prize
Postmark Deadline: December 31
This prestigious award for a full-length manuscript gives a $3,000 cash prize, publication, and a week-long residency at MASS MoCA, a modern art museum in North Adams, MA, valued at $1,500. Stricker's re-wilding won the 2020 contest. This philosophical poem-sequence suggests that humans' family members include animals, plants, and so-called inanimate natural features such as rocks and rivers. "if a corporation is a person does it wake up/in dread like a person sometimes does", she queries half in jest, concluding that "if trees/have no soul/then neither/do we".
HOW TO IDENTIFY YOURSELF WITH A WOUND (2012)
by KB
Winner of the 2021 Saguaro Poetry Prize
Entries must be received by December 31
This poetry chapbook prize from Kallisto Gaia Press gives $1,200 and publication. In the title poem of their winning collection, the speaker recreates the memory of a playground fight with a frenemy who called them a homophobic slur, holding the painful sensations alongside a broader view of the oppressions that stressed both participants: "I saw her/biting into my arm, wishing that justice would come spilling out."
MOZART IN THE XXI CENTURY
by Leonora Simonovis
Winner of the 2021 Colorado Prize for Poetry
Postmark Deadline: January 14
This long-running award from Colorado State University gives $2,500 and publication for a full-length collection. Simonovis' debut collection Study of the Raft won the most recent contest. This poem recounts the tragic heroism of a young Venezuelan man who was tortured by the Maduro regime for playing his violin at a protest.
from HOSPITAL PAMPHLET
by Paul Hlava Ceballos
Winner of the 2021 Donald Hall Prize for Poetry
Entries must be received between January 1-February 28
This competitive award for a full-length poetry manuscript is sponsored by AWP and includes $5,500 and publication by the University of Pittsburgh Press. Ceballos won the most recent contest with his collection banana [ ], an expansion of his chapbook about the brutal exploitation of South American workers and land by the Del Monte fruit company. In this visionary selection from his long poem "Hospital Pamphlet", an organ transplant technician muses about the lives that exist inside other lives, as past and future are superimposed on each other.
"The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock", illustrated by Julian Peters (part one)
Here begins the complete 24-page comic-book adaptation of "The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock" by T.S. Eliot, illustrated by Julian Peters. We will reprint all 24 pages over the next several newsletters.
Need a last-minute holiday gift? Order Poems to See By, a handsome book of 24 classic poems with illustrations by Mr. Peters.



To be continued in our January 15 newsletter
The Last Word
Why Witchcraft?
As I've made a safer life for myself, and opened up to the experience of embodiment, divinity no longer seems remote and capricious. Witchcraft teaches me to attune to the presence of benevolent consciousnesses and accessible spiritual gifts in every aspect of the physical world. Self begins to feel more porous and continuous with the earth's cycles of death and renewal - a great comfort during this pandemic.
Read more
Jendi Reiter is the editor of Winning Writers.
Follow Jendi on Twitter at @JendiReiter.
© 2001–2021 Winning Writers. All rights reserved except for fair use.
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Sample Cover Letter and Bio
Your cover letter should have all your major sites listed;
Mine looks like this
John(Jake) Cosmos Aller
Novelist, poet, retired U.S. Diplomat
PSC 450, Box 63
APO AP 96206
Tel: 703–436–1402
Email: authorjakecosmosaller@gmail.com
Web: Https://theworldaccordingtocosmos.com
Twitter: jakecaller, allerjc2
Followed by standard verbiage including bio
I am submitting the following poems for your chapbook open reading period.
Acknowledgment:
These poems were written for the April Poetry month this year. They were based on prompts supplied by NaPoWrMo, Poetry Superhighway, Local Gems, and Writers Digest, and posted on All poetry, Writing.com, Fan Story, Poetry Superhighway, Poetry Soup, and Writers 'Digest, and on my blog, Https://theworldaccordingtocosmos.com, but not otherwise submitted or published. I have compiled my poems written for the last five April Poetry contests so this is just part of a broader collection of poems. I am submitting 12 poems out of the two hundred poems written during the challenge.
Index
Warming Up to the Day Writers Digest prompt
Re-born Dream Girl Local Gem prompt
No More April Fool's Day! Writers 'Digest prompt
Insomnia Blues Writing.com Dew Drop In prompt Sleep - 
Second Chances? Writer's Digest prompt
A Solivagant's Journey To Distant Times NaNoWriMo Prompt
Alone Glosa NaPoWriMo
Power of Love Sidewalk Poem Writing com prompt
The Smells of Korean food Writers Digest prompt
Something Fixable Local Gems prompt
You can't fix stupid something unfixable local gems
Sam Adams Goes Down the Rabbit Hole, NaNoPoMo Prompt
I have been writing poetry and short stories for decades and have published my poetry and fiction in over 25 literary journals. My poetry can best be described as "neo-beatnik" as growing up in Berkeley I was heavily influenced by the beatnik writers. I also just launched my web page, "the World According to Cosmos" which features my writing and political and other observations. The URL is https://theworldaccordingtocosmos.com
I have completed five SF novels, - Giant Nazi Spiders, the Great Divorce, Jurassic Cruise, Ft. Ashland, and Timeless Love Stories. I have completed ten volumes of poetry (over 3,000 poems) and one volume of short stories. Over 35 35 literary journals and sites have published my work, and complete publication credits are available upon request.
During my foreign service career, I served in ten countries (Korea, Thailand, India, the Eastern Caribbean (lived in Barbados but covered Antigua, Barbados, Dominica, Grenada, St Kitts, St Lucia, and St Vincent), and Spain. I grew up in Berkeley, California, and have lived all over the U.S. and overseas. I currently spend half the year in Korea and half the year in the United States.
Regards,
Jake Cosmos Aller
Bio Follows:
John ("Jake") Cosmos Aller is a novelist, poet, and retired U.S. Foreign Service officer with the U.S. State Department. Before joining the U.S. State Department, Jake taught overseas for eight years, and served in the Peace Corps He grew up in Berkeley. His poetry blog can be found at https://theworldaccordingtocosmos.com
Publication credits - when is something considered published or not?
There are three things to consider. Starting you need to get published widely. The open poetry forums sometimes count and sometimes don't. once you have been published on the free to enter sites unpaid sites you can move up to trying the paid literary sites. But remember that many literary sites consider any publication online to be published, so you have to be selected what you post. I usually only post things I have already posted or have published and reserve about half of my writing as "unpublished). Read the submission guidelines and look at their latest issue if you can, and submit widely. It is a numbers game.
95% rejection rate is the norm, rule of ten
But 90 % rejection rate is the norm for everyone. Just the name of the game.
Of 100 people who want to write a novel, 10 will finish that novel. Of those who finish it, 10 percent will get published through a traditional publisher, and maybe 30 percent self-publish. In any event, only 5 of the original hundred will be published. Of those who get published only 10% will make any money (most will lose money, particularly the self-publishing people) In other words of the thousands of people who attempt to get published, only a hand full will make money full-time and any of the others make living selling webinars, etc teaching our "their secrets" that they don't want you to know and promising that any can publish on Kindle for free. i.e. the Self-publishing school. That may be so, but unless you have a team behind you - a publishing company and self-publishing services (editorial services are essential. you won't make any money at it. These seminars cost hundreds of dollars. I made the mistake of taking a couple of these courses and found that it was mostly things I already knew. Hint: the Do It Yourself MFA program folks.
Scams
There are lots of contests out, many are legit but many are scams. Things to look for are excessive fees or excessive awards or offers of self-service publication. Check them out at the winning writer's list below or writers beware. When in doubt don't submit. I have been burned before.
Many of these sites will publish you but then sell you the book. The more legitimate places will send you the link to your site and give you a free subscriber's only e-copy. In the end, they are there to make money. A few will pay you. So far I have made 300 dollars.
There are lots of sites that claim they can teach you the secrets of becoming a published writer and that is so easy to make money at it. The sad reality is this the rule of ten still applies.
Edit Edit Edit
Do a through a self-edit as you can - Grammarly works, Pro-writer, Edit, or read out loud are the minimum. Join some writing groups - FB has some good ones, Linkidlin is for serious published writers only it seems - they are intimidating to approach. Writing com Poet's Place is great as are their daily challenges. Fan story can be good. Poetry soup as well.
How to read rejection notices
And now the last piece of unsolicited advice. Rejection notices come in three flavors - a form letter that says it was not for us, sorry. A nicer letter that invites you to re-submit. And occasionally a horrid in-your-face email rejection. And the last one with detailed critiques.
If you get the second or last one submit it. They are telling you that they do want to read more of your stuff, but don't re-submit -send them new stuff and wait a month or so I always thank them for considering my work. If you get the "evil gram " save it could become useful if you become famous. Stephen King saved most of them as did the Harry Potter author. Never respond to the evil grams other than a generic thank you for reading my work. The worst ones are the evil ones followed by a solicitation to use their services. BIG SCAM ALERT Run away!
A few places have liked my work. Scarlet Leaf, Scars, and Two Drops of Ink are great sites that have published my work.
There are several others out there but that's enough for now. Please feel free to let me know if you find out other useful sites.
Other useful sites
Winning Writers has a list of legit free contests as well as places to avoid
The following is the to-avoid list
We suggest you avoid the following contests and organizations. Many appear to be disguised vanity publishers, whose goal is to sell you expensive personalized products and attract you to conferences. Others may charge you membership or service fees for which the benefits are questionable, or which can be obtained elsewhere for free. Still, others claim the right to publish your entry whether or not you win a prize. Winning prizes from these organizations will add little to your resume, and may even make you look amateurish to publishers and other poets.

10KCASH Contest
America Library of Poetry
The Amherst Society
Appellee Publishing
The Brightest Arena (Words Aglow)
Cader Publishing
Circle of Poets
Eber & Wein
Famous Poets Society (aka Christian Poets Guild)
Forward Poetry
Free editorial Literary Contest
Greenspring Publishing
Iliad Press (an imprint of Cader Publishing)
Iliad Literary Awards Program
International Library of Photography (aka Picture.com)
International Library of Poetry
International Poetry Digest
International Poetry Hall of Fame
International Society of Poets
JMW Publishing Company
League of American Poets (poetryamerica.com)
The National Amateur Poetry Competition (Eber & Wein)
The National Archives
National Library of Poetry
Noble House (an affiliate of Watermark Press)
Paramount Group
Picture.com (aka International Library of Photography)
Poetry Institute of Africa
Poetry Institute of Canada
Poetry Laureates
Poetry Nation
Poetry Press
Poetry Press Publishing (songwritingopportunities.com)
Poetry Publications International (The Poet's Yearbook; The Top 100 Poems of [Year])
Poetry Revival Contest
Poetry Unlimited
The Poets' Guild
PoetsOnly.com
The Poets' Workshop (www.poets.com and World Poetry Movement)
PublishMyPoetry.net
Sparrowgrass Poetry Forum
Stamford Research
TA.TI. Edizioni
United Press
Watermark Press
White Oak Press (aka Poetry America)
World Poetry Movement
Z Publishing
I'd add Poetry International to the list - that appears to be a scam.
The most common pitch is to make poets buy their anthologies as a condition of publication. Publishers in this category include Famous Poets Society, Sparrowgrass Poetry Forum, The Amherst Society, The Poets' Guild, Poetry Press, Poetry Unlimited, The National Archives, and JMW Publishing. Others try to sell you services, such as manuscript editing or agency representation.
Vanity contests are characterized by low standards and are willing to publish most of the submissions they receive (typically half or more). They primarily market their publications to the contestants themselves, often at high prices. Few copies are sold to independent buyers or libraries. A vanity contest is not necessarily a "scam". It may disclose its terms and selection procedures fully and accurately. Nevertheless, all of the contests above are a waste of your time. There are plenty of better ones to submit to, selective contests that want to promote good work to a wider audience.
Some of the contests that target schools, such as Polar Expressions Publishing, Young Writers of Canada, and Creative Communication/Poetic Power, make us uncomfortable. These contests exercise a modest degree of selectivity, accepting 25–80% of entries. While this is better than publishing virtually all entries, we prefer more rigorous contests that reserve praise and publicity for truly outstanding work. We're concerned that excessive praise for average work may confuse writers about the meaning of excellence and weaken their drive to improve.
Watch out for online critique forums and social networking sites that offer what appear to be free contests, but make unreasonable claims to your intellectual property rights in the fine print. Some online contests require you to post an entire book-length manuscript for reader votes; this may prevent you from shopping the manuscript elsewhere if it does not win the contest because it would already be considered "published". Other contests assert the right to publish all entries without notice or compensation, which is not a good deal for writers and not a normal practice among reputable contests. Also be wary of contests that assert derivative rights over all winning or submitted entries, such as the right to make and distribute audio/video versions or translations. Reputable contests may ask writers for a license to reproduce their work in other media, but it should always be clear that the writer retains creative control over the end product and the right to terminate the license.
Writers considering self-publishing should read BookBaby's article on spotting self-publishing scams. Be wary of service providers that make extravagant promises of profits or book sales; operate under several different business names; or inflate their price tag with unnecessary additional services instead of offering à la carte options. Similar to the online forums mentioned above, some of these self-publishing companies will sponsor "free" contests that are lead-generation devices for aggressive marketing campaigns, or worse. Copyright your manuscript before submitting, it to reduce the risk of piracy.
The Poets Literary Agency - Avoid
We feel this site is a bad deal for poets because it misrepresents how the poetry publishing market works. Reputable publishing houses use contests and open submission periods to find new poets. The use of agents is very rare. The trade shows and mass mailings that Poets Literary Agency mentions may be valuable for commercial nonfiction but are not a normal publicity channel for poetry. Moreover, their critique fee (reported to be $74 as of October 2006) is suspiciously high, especially when it's not obvious that the staff has any literary (as opposed to marketing) credentials.
Phishing Schemes
Scammers have been targeting writers with fake invitations to conferences, purporting to be sponsored by major publishers such as Macmillan. The speaking engagement "contract" tricks writers into sending money or disclosing personal data. Read more about these scams and how to avoid them in this 2022 article by Kevin Larimer for Poets & Writers.
High-Priced Book Promotion Services
Poets and other small press authors should be on the lookout for marketing schemes that charge high fees for book publicity services of dubious value. Winning Writers newsletter editor Jendi Reiter, author of the poetry collection A Talent for Sadness (Turning Point Books, 2003), recently received a mass-mailed sales pitch from Airleaf Publishing & Book Selling. Headed "A National Campaign for A Talent for Sadness!", the letter purported to be a "special invitation" to participate in a national publicity campaign, including television commercials, full-color glossy newspaper inserts, interviews on local radio shows, and telemarketing calls encouraging bookstores to stock her book. All for the rock-bottom price of…$6,996.
While overpriced publicity services are nothing new, we felt this personalized letter crossed an ethical line by creating a false appearance of selectivity. "We recently discovered A Talent for Sadness and we believe it has the potential to be a national bestseller. Your book comes highly recommended and is precisely the kind of book we have had the most success selling." Well, gee. We'd like to think so, but poetry books that aren't written by pop stars or ex-presidents rarely achieve that level of commercial success. The total mismatch between these extravagant promises and the type of book being promoted makes us very suspicious of Airleaf's claim that "we have invited a very select group of authors and are accepting just the first 25." More likely they generated a letter like this for everyone on their mailing list who had a book out.
Even leaving aside the dishonesty, we feel services like these are generally not a good investment. It's better to do your targeted research on the bookstores, local radio and TV stations, and performance spaces that would be most appropriate for promoting your book, instead of wasting money on mass-mailing to markets that aren't appropriate for you. For far less money than Airleaf is charging, you can hire an assistant to help you schedule readings and network with booksellers if you don't have time to do everything yourself. Pick up a copy of Carolyn Howard-Johnson's The Frugal Book Promoter for some creative ideas.
Zimbo Books
We received a promotional email from this company in October 2008 for the Zimbo Books Fiction Competition 2008:
Zimbo Books is pleased to announce the Zimbo Books Fiction Competition 2008 commemorating the launch of Zimbo Books. This exciting competition as described in the competition rules has 2 major benefits:
* A prize pool of USD 100,000 with the first prize of $80,000.
The next four runners-up get $5,000 each.
* One year's subscription for all Authors to sell their books online via Zimbo Books (value $45).
The closing date of Registration for the Competition is 21 April 2009. The registration fee is USD 85 per entry. Authors can enter more than one book.
Such big dollar amounts for a literary contest should be the first tip-off that something is amiss. Add in the fact that the entry fee is unusually high, and the sponsor has no literary track record, and this starts to look like a contest to avoid, even if no deception is involved. I was also concerned that the sponsor never responded to my email asking for more details about the rules.
We asked our Australian affiliate, John H. Reid, for feedback on this Australia-based publisher and their contest terms. John observed that even if it's a genuine contest, "it has a 99.9% chance of failure. This type of PDF marketing has been tried before and has failed every time.
"Lulu and quite a few other USA publishers have a PDF or download marketing division, but it's mostly window dressing. Only one in a thousand sales are PDF downloads. And once bitten, twice shy. A reader who does this once is unlikely to return. The disadvantages are too great.
"And the whole idea of a contest with a whopping big prize and a whopping big entry fee has been tried before many times. All have failed dismally. At $85 they would be extremely lucky to get 100 entries. But even if they received 1,000 they are still in the red."
John also found this suspicious clause buried in their multi-page rules: "In the event, an insufficient number of entries are received, Zimbo Books reserves the right to cancel the Competition and shall be under no obligation to award the prizes, but will refund $40 of the [$85] Registration Fee to the author's Zimbo account." Thus, the whole enterprise could well be a scam to generate non-refundable entry fees.
The lessons: Read the fine print, and if a prize seems too big to be real, it probably is.
Character Building Counts Book Awards
The name and URL of the "CBC Book Awards" appear designed to create confusion between this contest and the much more reputable and prestigious CBC Literary Awards from the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation. The Character-Building Counts Book Awards charge an above-average entry fee of $85, with no cash prize. Instead, winners are promised such nebulous benefits as "potential increased sales and income" and a "professional press release sent to thousands of TV, radio, and print media outlets". Moreover, the site contains no information about the judges or the sponsoring organization, and the link to past winners does not work. For a contest that supposedly rewards books with "character-building messages", the organizers are curiously lacking in transparency.
Check their site out for their list of free legit contests -it is updated frequently.
And writers beware is also a great site to go to for scam research. When in doubt do a thorough search, google, and check winning writers and writers beware.
And if you get unsolicited offers to publish, that is almost always a scam. Once you start submitting the fraudsters will pounce like sharks when they smell fresh blood.
MODPO
MOD PO is a free coursea course on modern poetry. It is open all year round but the symposium version is offered in the fall.
Dear jake aller & all MoD Po people everywhere:
To those ModPo'ers who have joined us recently: I urge you to explore all the materials and guides you can find by clicking "Resources" on the left-side menu of any ModPo page - and also to contact us at modpo@writing.upenn.edu if you have any questions about the course or about navigating our site.

As you know, we begin our annual 10-week run together through the syllabus on September 3, 2022. The course is open and available all year but this upcoming ten-week session we call our "symposium mode." Plan to join us even if by then you will have been through the course on your own or joined for previous symposia.

Today I want to tell you about two things:
1. We've added Frost's "Birches" to ModPoPLUS. This includes a rare 1936 recording of Frost performing the poem. And it includes a new "on location" video in which Laynie Browne and I, along with Stephen Metcalf (host of the Slate Culture Gabfest), walk through a birch forest in the Catskills while discussing this poem. Expert audio was managed by Chris Martin, while, walking backward, Zach Carduner handled the camera with our new fabulous "steady-cam" harness. Watch the results! See the links below.
2. A group of devoted ModPo citizens has formed another SloPo discussion group. They have been reading and talking about long poems, most recently Wallace Stevens's "serial" poem titled "An Ordinary Evening in New Haven." They are about to begin discussing John Ashbery's "Self-Portrait in a Convex Mirror." John Fadely from this group tells me this: "We'll meet weekly on Zoom for 1 to 1.5 hours per session on Saturday mornings (Eastern time)." If you are interested in joining this group, or if you are merely interested in finding out more, go HERE.
Consistently yours,
 - Al Filreis
**
from ModPoPLUS:
FROST'S "BIRCHES"
5.1 read Robert Frost's "Birches": LINK TO TEXT
5.2 listen to Frost recite "Birches": LINK TO AUDIO
5.3 watch "on location" discussion of "Birches": LINK TO VIDEO [OFFSITE COPY]
Go to course
Other useful sites and resources

All poetry
www.allpoetry.com
Another large site costs $5 a month but the free option is okay. If you choose the free option every time you post you have to review other works. And can become fans of their work. I have over 500 followers. I also link my web page on my poetry submissions which so far they have allowed.
And you can post your posts on your blog. Note some professionals might consider this to be a bit of a scam as they don't turn anyone back except for promoting racism etc. more of a social media site than a poetry publication site but still lots of people post there and get something out of it.
They do have a self-publishing option which I have not done yet.
Poetry soup
www. Poetrysoup.com
similar to all poetry but seems more professional. You can post up to ten per day. You have to choose which form your poem is but their descriptions are pretty good. I usually opt for free verse or haiku. But they have lots of choices and lots of examples.
Poetry magnum opus
Similar to poetry soup - seems more professional and I am moving towards using their services more.
Other sites I submit to from time to time include:
Cosmosfunnel 3 items per session
Hello Poetry individual postings
Moontown Facebook page individual postings
Poem Hunter individual postings
Poetry Nook individual postings
Poetry Super highway Facebook page individual postings
Facebook
Various Facebook groups including individual postings
My groups
Family
State department
Berkeley High school zoom
Berkeley High school

Contemporary Poets
Calls for submission
Writers Unite
Poetic license bureau
Worldwide poetry
Love poetry and thoughts
Verse virtual
Writer's ignite
Artistic poetry
The poet's corner
Sunrise poetry garden
Structural poetry
Poetry within life
Poetry
Passion of poetry
Poetry out loud
Poetry family
Poetry for the soul
Writers café
For Facebook postings don't post more than 20 sites at a time otherwise you might get a spam alert notice.
The general rule of thumb here and on these other sites is to post each poem or story separately and no more than ten per day. Fan story limits you to two per 24-hour period. And they charge you per posting but you can earn fan story credits by reviewing items. I usually review between five to ten per session then enter one or two contests and then post something I just posted on writing com or have had published.
April Poetry Madness
NaPoWriMo, Poetry superhighway, individual postings, and writing com all participate in the annual April poetry madness competition. You can see my 2022 entries on my blog.

Poetry Superhighway contests
Poetry Superhighway does a weekly open mike zoom call-in, an annual poetry contest, and once a year poetry chapbook exchange. You can see my chapbook here
A good rule of thumb is you should post things the same day every week. You should update your blog once a week, copy the blog entry to medium, substack, Wattpad, and writing com afterward, and post five to ten items daily on each of the sites you decide to post to. For me, I post daily at writing com and fan story, and once a week to All poetry, poetry soup, and every other week to the other sites. Another rule of thumb is only to post items you have already posted in your blog, on your sites, or have been published because you need to reserve at least half of your work as "unpublished". In other words, cross-posts everywhere. It is expected. Finally, join Facebook writing clubs and link to writing communities. Those are great places to get feedback and exposure. Add a link to each submission if it is allowed. Some groups don't allow links, others only once a week, and others are okay with it.
Final Site Lit Mag Review
3 Ways to Get Started: Lit Mag Advice for Newbies, From a Newbie
Writer new to submitting shares insights and experience
Becky Tuch
May 26
Welcome to our weekly column offering perspectives on lit mag publishing, with contributions from readers, writers, and editors all over the world.
________________________________________
By Lily Anderson
"[Author Name]'s work can be found in…"
Author bios from sites like this to the backs of novels are often full of listed publications, which, when I read them, can contribute to a suffocating web of self-doubt. This industry can be overwhelming, and the "you've gotta start somewhere!" mantra is wildly unhelpful when you have no idea where to start. Where can my work be found? Where do I want it to be found? I have short fiction, poems, and essays to share, but where do I even begin?
As a young writer fresh out of undergrad with no MFA lined up, I quickly began crafting my web of insecurity. I had work I wanted to see published, work I thought was good, but had no idea how to do so. The poorly crafted Instagram posts seen by four people weren't seeming to cut it.
Most of the podcasts I listened to and things I read provided advice on the writing process, navigating agents, and getting your book sold, but when it came to publishing short fiction, poetry, and submitting to contests, I found very little.
How was I supposed to share my short fiction, build a network, and (hopefully) get paid with absolutely no connections?
Lit mags, in all their glory, ended up serving as my entrance to the world of published writing. Perhaps more importantly, though, the countless submissions, the seemingly endless rejections, and the handful of acceptances have all contributed to building my confidence as a young writer.
Over the past eight months, I have spent about an hour a week researching literary magazines and submitting pieces of my writing. The three tips below illustrate a process I have found to be efficient and beneficial in building your publication list as a young writer. In a way, I am addressing this article to myself eight months ago - it is chock-full of the things I wish I had known right away.
1. INDIE MAGS, BABY!
As many of us do, I often find myself romanticizing the idea of being a real writer, whatever that means, more than I should. This was particularly counter-productive when I first started submitting to literary magazines, as time carved out for sending out my work was spent daydreaming about the inevitable, glorious acceptance email from The New Yorker I was waiting on.
Spoiler alert - still haven't heard back from them.
This is not to say you shouldn't submit to the large, established publications you love and daydream about. You still should! However, don't be like me and rule out smaller, independent magazines just because they don't fit your aesthetic, daydreamed direction. I wanted my resumé to contain only the flashiest of flashy publications, but I soon realized the magic in many, many indie mags.
There are many pros to submitting to smaller publications. In my experience, the response time is often faster, and the editors engage with your work kindly and constructively. I have found them to not only accept, but encourage unpublished and young writers. The anxiety-inducing "her writing appears in" has yet to be a barrier! There is such a wide variety of magazines, from genre-specific ones (fantasy, romance, horror, etc.) to those that publish anything and everything.
I utilize Duotrope to find these magical independent gems. For $5 a month, you have access to quite an impressive database full of magazines accepting submissions. Duotrope's filtering abilities make it very simple - you can weed publications out by their payment status if they accept simultaneous submissions, what genres they like, and oh so many more. I typically utilize three or four filters when I am searching and go through the massive list alphabetically. After over one hundred submissions, I have barely scratched the "E"s.
2. CONTESTS (through lit mags)!
Many literary magazines run contests in conjunction with their typical publications. They exist for everything from a poem to short stories to an essay, and there is often some serious money involved. I have personally enjoyed submitting flash fiction. Some are general and have very loose requirements, while others have specific, often ridiculously zany, prompts. I have seen everything from a 10-word story to a poem about a pendulum.
While it is unlikely you will already have something written that fits the wackier requirements, these prompts can be great creative constraints. Plus, you can always submit what you write to other publications if you are rejected.
I would be remiss if I didn't mention the fantastic blogger Erica Verrillo of "Curiosity Never Killed the Writer," who links free contests, magazines accepting submissions, and many more resources in her posts. She does this in an accessible, organized manner that I look forward to every single month.
3. SPREADSHEET IT!
Staying organized throughout this process is crucial. Months often pass between the time you submitted your piece and when you hear back from the magazine. If you are accepted, add another few months for it to be published. If you are submitting to roughly twenty magazines a month, it can become quite challenging to stay on top of everything without some sort of system.
The spreadsheet I use - a basic Microsoft Excel document - helps me stay on top of things. I note the date, magazine name, piece, and whether or not I should return to it later for every single submission. When I am accepted or rejected, I mark that down, too.
My spreadsheet also helps me notify magazines when a piece I submitted has been accepted elsewhere. Most publications require you to indicate if your piece is a simultaneous submission, or if you are submitting it elsewhere. Sending a quick email to withdraw your piece, or removing it yourself if the magazine has some form of submissions portal, is a kindness (and a mandate, in many cases), that I have been told makes editors' lives much easier. The great people who staff the magazines I submit to have certainly appreciated when I do this. Once, when I told a magazine my piece had been accepted elsewhere they emailed and asked for more of my writing, and ended up accepting something else. You never know.
The world of literary magazines can be ridiculously intimidating, but the payoffs (financial, emotional, and professional) make every little action taken worth it.
Like most things in life, having people to talk to, share contests and cool magazines with, and share creative work has been such a blessing in this crazy world of publication. I am active on a Discord server called "the word garden," which I encourage absolutely everyone who enjoys writing to join. Publication resources, contests, challenges, and just about anything writing-related are discussed and nurtured there.
Wonderful magazines and communities like "the word garden" hold my hand as I come closer and closer to feeling like a real author. The ever daunting author bio still induces a bit of anxiety in me. But, utilizing the advice I laid out here, I no longer have a blank space after "her work can be found in…"
It can be so easy, at least for me, to stew in my creativity and fixate on the idea that nobody may ever read my words. Independent lit mags have yanked me away from that web of insecurity.
Four additional great resources,
I copy my blog postings to blog lovin, medium, substack, and writing.com. Medium, substack, and Wattpad have a paid version where you receive 1 dollar for every time anyone reads your work but unfortunately only works in the U.S. and you have to pay 50 dollars per year to activate it.
________________________________________
Literary Mama is another great market resource
CONTESTS
________________________________________
1729 Book Prize in Prose - novels, novellas, story collections, memoirs, auto/biographies, essay collections - 7/15
42 Miles Press - poetry manuscripts - 6/15
Bellevue Literary Review - poem, short story, essays about health, healing, illness, the body, and the mind - 7/15
Blue Mountain Arts Poetry Contest - poetry - 6/30
Cincinnati Review Robert and Adele Schiff Awards - poetry, literary nonfiction, fiction - 7/15
Finishing Line Press Women's Chapbook Competition - poetry - 9/15
Housatonic Book Awards - fiction, nonfiction, poetry, and young adult/middle grade published in 2021–6/13.
Literary Taxidermy Writing Competition - short stories, poetry - 7/11
Los Angeles Review Literary Awards - poetry, short story, essay - 6/30
Narrative Prize for new and emerging writers - short story, novel excerpt, poetry, one-act play, graphic story, literary nonfiction - 6/15
Narrative Spring 2022 Story Contest - fiction, essays, memoirs, photo essays, graphic stories, literary nonfiction - 7/31
Narrative Poetry Contest - poetry - 7/15
Rattle Poetry Prize - poetry - 7/15
________________________________________
ANTHOLOGIES
________________________________________
Bell Press Books - nonfiction, poetry about Rituals or Framework of the Human Body - 6/15
Brigids Gate Press Dangerous Waters Anthology - stories, poems, and drabbles about malevolent mermaids, sinister sirens, scary selkies, spirits, and other deadly and dangerous women of the sea - 6/30
"Standing Up" - An Anthology in Support of Ukraine - true nonfiction stories, poetry - 6/15
Toxic Workplaces Anthology - Women's Writing Workshop - Nonfiction - 12/1
________________________________________
UPCOMING DEADLINES
Chicken Soup for the Soul - various topics and deadlines in June and July
Creative Nonfiction - currently seeking true stories by (or about) nurses - 6/27
Creative Nonfiction - also currently seeking short nonfiction for Sunday Short Read - 8/1
HerStry Traveling Women Series - personal essay - 7/1
Isele Magazine - fiction, nonfiction, poetry, photography, visual art, and hybrid works that explore the freedom, euphoria, and serenity in the queer existence - 6/30
Fairy Tale Review - queer fairy-tale poetry and prose written by writers who self-identify as LGBTQIA+ - 6/30
❤️ Farmerish - creative nonfiction, personal essays, expository essays, instructional, farmer profiles, recipes, book reviews, poetry - 6/14
The Maine Review - nonfiction, fiction, poetry - 7/31
McNeese Review - poetry, fiction, nonfiction - 8/31
❤️ Mom Egg Review - Poetry, Fiction, Creative Prose, Hybrid, Visual Art - 7/15
Mud Season Review - poetry, creative nonfiction, fiction, art - 6/30
Roxane Gay's The Audacity Emerging Writers Series - literary essay, memoir - open until 24 essays accepted
Threadcount - prose, poetry, fiction, nonfiction, and hybrid text - 6/30
Whale Road Review - poetry, short prose - 6/30
________________________________________
ROLLING SUBMISSIONS
32 Poems - Poetry, Reviews
The Acentos Review - Poetry, Fiction, Nonfiction, Translation, Cross-Genre, Art
After The Art - Essays on Art
Afternoon Visitor - Poetry, Visual Poetry, Hybrid, Visual Art
AGNI - Poetry and Prose
Agony Opera - Fiction, Flash Fiction, Poetry, Hybrid
Always Crashing - Poetry, Fiction, Collage, Video, Audio, Hybrid, Other
The American Journal of Poetry - Poetry - $5 fee
Animal Literary Magazine - Nonfiction, Fiction, Poetry, Art
Another New Calligraphy - Books, Music
Anti-Heroin Chic - Poetry, Fiction, Nonfiction, Art
Apartment Poetry - Poetry
Assay - Critical Nonfiction
The Aunt Flo Project - Poetry, Fiction, Nonfiction, and Flash About Menstruation
Auroras and Blossoms - Poetry, Flash Fiction, Essays, Short Stories, Paintings, Drawings, Photography
Balloons Literary Journal - Poetry, Fiction, Art, Photography
Baobab Press - Nonfiction, Fiction, Poetry, Graphic Narrative, Children's Books
Birdcoat Quarterly - Poetry, Nonfiction / Fee: $3
Biscuit Root Drive - Poetry, Fiction, Nonfiction, Art
BlazeVOX [books] - Poetry, Fiction, Nonfiction, Literary Criticism
Bosphorus Review of Books - Fiction, Nonfiction, Poetry, Book Reviews
Braided Way - Nonfiction, Fiction, Poetry, Photography
Brittle Paper - Fiction, Poetry, Creative Nonfiction, Book reviews, Essays, Literary Commentaries, Fun Listicles,
The Carolina Quarterly - Poetry, Fiction, Nonfiction, Art
Cicada Magazine - Poetry, Fiction, Nonfiction
❤️ Chicago Parent - Nonfiction
The Coachella Review - Blog, Poetry, Fiction, Nonfiction, Drama
The Concrete Desert Review - Children's Poetry and Stories, Art
Cooper Dillon Books - Poetry
Counterpath Press - Queries
Creative Nonfiction - Pitches for writing about writing
Damaged Goods Press - Poetry, Essays, and Hybrid Writing from Queer and Trans Writers
The Decadent Review - Criticism, Reviews, Essays
Deep Vellum Publishing - Poetry, Fiction, Nonfiction, Translations
Disorder Press - Poetry, Fiction, Nonfiction
Divergents Magazine - Poetry, Nonfiction, Photography, Art from the Neuro-Divergent Community
Expanded Field - Poetry, Fiction, Nonfiction, Comics, Experiments
The Fictional Cafe - Fiction, Poetry, Art
Flash Fiction Online - Fantasy, Horror, Science Fiction, Mainstream, Literary, Horror, Seasonal, Other
The Forge - Fiction, Nonfiction
Golden Walkman - Poetry, Fiction, Nonfiction, Critical Essays, Music
Greying Ghost Press- Pamphlet and Art Zine Submissions - Nonfiction, Art
Hindsight - Nonfiction, Pandemic-related
HerKind Collective - Articles, Essays
HerStry - Nonfiction
❤️ Her View From Home - Nonfiction
❤️ Hip Mama - Articles, Art
The Kalahari Review - Poetry, Fiction, Nonfiction, Personal Essay, Photography, Visual Art - etc. that explores modern Africa and Africans, including from the Diaspora
Kiddiepunk - Zines and Books
Kernpunkt - Books, Novellas
Lavender Review - Poetry, Art
Lily Poetry Review - Poetry
The Literary Bohemian - Poetry, Postcard Prose (❤50 words), Visual Poetry / Prose
LitMag - Fiction, Poetry, Nonfiction
Litmus Press - Proposals for Translations
Malahat Review - Poetry, Short Fiction, and Creative Nonfiction
Mediterranean Poetry - Poetry/Prose inspired in some way or the other by the Mediterranean world
Minola - Poetry, Fiction, Nonfiction
The Missouri Review - Poetry, Fiction, Nonfiction
❤️ MOPS Blogs - Nonfiction
The Moth - Short Fiction, Poetry
❤️ Motherly - Essays, Videos
❤️ Motherwell - Weekly Columns
❤️ Mutha Magazine - Nonfiction
Mystery Weekly - Fiction
Narrative - fiction, poetry, personal essays, humor, sketches, memoirs, literary biographies, commentary
Narratively - Nonfiction, Photography
New Readers Magazine - Fiction, Poetry, Articles, Art
Northwest Review - Art, Translation, Poetry, Nonfiction, Fiction - $3 fee
Outpost 19 - Fiction, Nonfiction, Hybrid
PANK - Poetry, Fiction, Nonfiction, Hybrid
Peacock Journal - Poetry, Fiction, Nonfiction, Art, Translation, Music
Pillow Talking - creative nonfiction stories of real-life bedroom conversations
Pithead Chapel - Art, Fiction, Nonfiction, Poetry
Ploughshares - Fiction, Nonfiction
Poor Yorick - Digital Video Shorts, Photo Essays, Art, Fiction, Nonfiction, Poetry
Pretty Owl Poetry - Poetry, Visual Art
❤️ Raising Mothers - BIWOC and Non-Binary Parents of Color - Nonfiction, Fiction, Poetry, Interviews, Book Reviews, Graphic Narrative
The Revolution Relaunch - Poetry, Fiction, Nonfiction, Art
Shift: A Journal of Literary Oddities - Fiction, Nonfiction, Poetry, Oddities
Sky Island Journal - Poetry, Fiction, Nonfiction
Smokelong - Flash Fiction, Art, Blog
Spuyten Duyvil - Poetry, Nonfiction, Fiction
Storm Cellar - Art, Nonfiction, Flash, Poetry
The Sun Magazine - personal essays, fiction, and poetry
The Sunlight Press - Nonfiction, Fiction, Poetry, Reviews, Craft, Photography
Surfaces - Poetry, Fiction, Nonfiction, Theory, Art, Text Collage
Sweet Lit - Poetry, Graphic Nonfiction
Throwback Books - Novelettes
Tupelo Press - Nonfiction
Typishly - Poetry, Fiction, Flash Fiction - $5 fee
Under the Gum Tree - Nonfiction, Art
Vegetarian Alcohol Press - Poetry, Nonfiction, Fiction, Drama
Vessel - Poetry, Nonfiction, Fiction
❤️ Verily– Nonfiction
Wildness - Poetry, Fiction, Nonfiction
Willow Springs - Nonfiction - $3 fee
WordMothers - Guest Posts
The Woven Tale Press - Art, Poetry, Fiction, Nonfiction
Writer's Digest - Nonfiction, Profiles, Memoir, Writing Advice, Children/Middle Grade/Young Adult
❤️ Yummy Mummy Club - Nonfiction
Zin Daily - Art, Poetry, Nonfiction, Fiction
That's it for the free advice. Hit me up if you have any concerns or wish to add to the list of useful sites.
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