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RECENT ITEMS
BY ONLINE AUTHORS
by JoDe
Rated: E | Assignment | Other | #1601337
Illustrating the components of Freytag's Pyramid
Freytag’s Pyramid breakdown of

         Exposition

         Rising Action

         Climax

         Falling Action

         Resolution



Sunrise - Class 2 – FREYTAG’S PYRAMID

{Practice Exercise

(I’ve cut and pasted this synopsis from Wikipedia)

{The Hut in the Woods



         A wood-cutter told his wife to have his oldest daughter bring him his dinner in the woods. She lost her way and in the night found a house with a gray-haired man and a hen, a cock, and a brindled cow. She asked for shelter. The man asked the animals, the animals said "Duks", and the man agreed, and told her to cook supper. She cooked for him and herself, and asked for a bed. He directed her to an upper room, where she went to sleep. The old man followed her and opened a trapdoor that let her down into the cellar.

         The next day, the same thing happened with the second daughter.

         On the third day, the youngest ended up in the hut. She pet the animals, and when she had made supper for herself and the old man, also got barley for the birds and hay for the cow. She went upstairs to sleep, but at midnight, a sound like the house tearing apart woke her. Still, it stopped, and she went back to sleep. In the morning, she found herself in a palace with a king's son, enchanted with three attendants, to remain there until a woman kind not only to people but to animals. He summoned her parents to the wedding, and made her sisters servants to a charcoal burner, until they learned not to leave poor animals to suffer hunger.



Exposition

A wood-cutter told his wife to have his oldest daughter bring him his dinner in the woods.



Rising Action

         She lost her way and in the night found a house with a gray-haired man and a hen, a cock, and a brindled cow. She asked for shelter. The man asked the animals, the animals said "Duks", and the man agreed, and told her to cook supper. She cooked for him and herself, and asked for a bed. He directed her to an upper room, where she went to sleep. The old man followed her and opened a trapdoor that let her down into the cellar.

         The next day, the same thing happened with the second daughter.

         On the third day, the youngest ended up in the hut. She pet the animals, and when she had made supper for herself and the old man, also got barley for the birds and hay for the cow.



Climax

         She went upstairs to sleep, but at midnight, a sound like the house tearing apart woke her. Still, it stopped,



Falling Action

‘…and she went back to sleep. In the morning, she found herself in a palace with a king's son, enchanted with three attendants, to remain there until a woman kind not only to people but to animals.



Resolution

          He summoned her parents to the wedding, and made her sisters servants to a charcoal burner, until they learned not to leave poor animals to suffer hunger.





Original version of ’Grandma Goes Missing’



         Diane was already waiting at the door when her grandmother finally check her hat in the mirror, picked up her handbag and went to the door.  Once on the sidewalk, she reached up, slipping her small hand in her grandmother’s larger one. 

         They smiled at each other, and then began walking the four short blocks to S. Carrolton Ave.  Once there, they crossed the wide expanse, stepping carefully over the streetcar tracks.  Then they walked along Carrolton, towards St. Charles Ave. 

         New Orleans can be hot—even in March.  The air was heavy with humidity and the familiar scent of live oaks.  These trees that lined the street had caused the concrete to heave up over the years, making a bumpy path.  But they padded along steadily, picking their way along the broken sidewalk.

         She was getting more and more excited as they got closer to the library.  Diane loved the library and looked forward to this weekly adventure with great anticipation.  They were nearly there, when her grandmother stopped and frowned. 

         “I forgot.  I promised to pick something up for your grandfather across the street.  And they close early on Saturday’s.”

“But Grandma, the library closes early too.”  This wasn’t exactly in a whine, but pretty nearly.  Diane turned, “Can’t you take me to the library steps and then get whatever it is without me?”

         “Well, dear I don’t…,” Her grandmother began.

         She said, “I’ll be good.  I'm nearly grownup.”

         Her grandmother looked from her, to her wristwatch and back at Diane.  “All right.  I won’t be long at all.  You go right in, pick out your books and behave.”  She watched the little girl walk on alone.  “And remember to be quiet,” she called.


         Diane was thrilled.  She was going to her most favorite place—alone.  At least for a while, that is.  She climbed the steps sedately.  Libraries were to be treated with respect.  She opened the outer door and went in. 

         The most wonderful smell met her, and she breathed in the heady aroma—a blend of old papers, rich leather and furniture polish.
  She loved the library.}  She walked daintily passed Mrs. Beaudreaux, the librarian, and after a respectful nod she headed straight for the geography section.

         She wanted to run up the stairs, but was afraid her footsteps would echo, and that would be bad.  With the exception of the librarian, there didn’t seem to be anyone else around.  She entered the row that held the oversized books of maps.

         Diane pulled out one of the leather-bound volumes, carried it over and placed it on one of the long tables.  Then she climbed into a chair, and reverently starting turning pages.
  She loved looking at the colorful maps and let her imagination run free.

         Tick, tick, tick.  The place was quiet as a tomb, except for the loud ticking of the clock hanging over Mrs. Beaudreaux’s desk.  She went and took out a second volume and a third, each time returning to her place at the table.  She again lost herself in her dreams.  Diane folded her arms on the open book, and rested her head on her arms—just for a minute. 

         When she lifted her head again, the shadows had stretched into long streaks across the table and it somehow seemed even quieter.  Diane looked around.  There was no sign of her grandma, or anyone else.  And all of a sudden, she felt kind of lonely. 

         She wasn’t scared…exactly.  She was just getting worried about her grandmother—that’s all.  Grandma should have gotten here by now.  She didn’t know why, but her breathing had changed to a little pant.  And her heart was tattooing inside her chest. 

         After a minute, the pounding slowed and her breathing returned to normal.  She slowly stood up, and looked around.  Still alone, she gathered up the books in her arms and returned them to their shelves carefully, as if that would make her grandma appear magically.  But it didn’t.

         Deep in thought, she descended the stairs wearing a frown.  How had this happened?  She had been so happy when she first arrived.  Now she wasn’t at all sure what she should do.
Go out in search of her grandmother?  Ask Mrs. Beaudreaux if she’d seen her—or maybe summon the police?

         How was she going to explain to them—her grandpa, her mom and dad, her brother—that she’d lost Grandma?  The pounding in chest was starting up again.  She plopped down on the bottom step and was just about to cry, when Grandma came through the doors into the entry hall.


         Diane rushed over and hugged her.  Everything was going to be fine now.





Grandma Goes Missing – Revised Version




         When Diane was a little girl, her most favorite place in the entire world, with the exception of sitting next to her grandpa on the sofa and watching TV, was the public library.  And going to the library on Saturday afternoons was just as sacred a ritual as attending mass on Sunday morning. 

         This week her trip was to be even more special, for her grandmother had told her that she was to go into the library alone.  Grandma had assured her she wouldn’t really be alone.  After all, the librarian, Mrs. Beaudreaux, would be there.  But her grandma had an errand that needed doing in a shop just across the street.  And Diane didn’t really need her ‘in’ the library.  Grandma like mysteries, while she loved geography books with maps and pictures of faraway places.  They only met at the desk as they were checking out Grandma’s books.

         New Orleans can be hot—even in March. The air was heavy with humidity and the familiar scent of live oaks. These trees that lined the street had caused the concrete to heave up over the years, making a bumpy path. But they padded along steadily, picking their way along the broken sidewalk.


         Diane was elated as they walked, hand in hand, the four short blocks up to S. Carrolton Ave., crossed the first pair of car lanes, the wide expanse of the median—stepping carefully over the streetcar tracks in the center—and the second lanes of cars.  Then they made they along the far side of Carrolton, moving towards St. Charles Ave., where the library sat on the corner.

         Her grandmother stopped at the foot of the library steps, squatted and looked into Diane’s eyes.  “I’m just going to be over there at the shoe repair place to pick up a pair of your grandfather’s shoes.  I shouldn’t be but a few minutes.  I know you’ll be a good girl.” She gave Diane an encouraging little push towards the steps, adding, “and remember to be quiet.” 

         Diane bounded up the steps, and turned around to watch her grandma make her way back across the street again, be fore she spun around and pulled the massive oak door open and entered.

         The most wonderful smell met her, and she breathed in the heady aroma—a blend of old papers, rich leather and furniture polish. She loved the library. She walked daintily passed Mrs. Beaudreaux, the librarian, and after a respectful nod she headed straight for the geography section.

         She wanted to run up the stairs, but was afraid her footsteps would echo, and that would be bad. With the exception of the librarian, there didn’t seem to be anyone else around. She entered the row that held the oversized books of maps.

         Diane pulled out one of the leather-bound volumes, carried it over and placed it on one of the long tables. Then she climbed into a chair, and reverently starting turning pages. She loved looking at the colorful maps and let her imagination run free.

         Tick, tick, tick. The place was quiet as a tomb, except for the loud ticking of the clock hanging over Mrs. Beaudreaux’s desk. She went and took out a second volume and a third, each time returning to her place at the table. She again lost herself in her dreams. Diane folded her arms on the open book, and rested her head on her arms—just for a minute.

         When she lifted her head again, the shadows had stretched into long streaks across the table and it somehow seemed even quieter. Diane looked around. There was no sign of her grandma, or anyone else. And all of a sudden, she felt kind of lonely.

         She wasn’t scared…exactly. She was just getting worried about her grandmother—that’s all. Grandma should have gotten here by now. She didn’t know why, but her breathing had changed to a little pant. And her heart was tattooing inside her chest.

         After a minute, the pounding slowed and her breathing returned to normal. She slowly stood up, and looked around. Still alone, she gathered up the books in her arms and returned them to their shelves carefully, as if that would make her grandma appear magically. But it didn’t.

         Deep in thought, she descended the stairs wearing a frown. How had this happened? She had been so happy when she first arrived. Now she wasn’t at all sure what she should do. Go out in search of her grandmother? Ask Mrs. Beaudreaux if she’d seen her—or maybe summon the police?

         How was she going to explain to them—her grandpa, her mom and dad, her brother—that she’d lost Grandma? The pounding in chest was starting up again. She plopped down on the bottom step and was just about to cry, when Grandma came through the doors into the entry hall.

         Diane rushed over and hugged her. Everything was going to be fine now.

© Copyright 2009 JoDe (UN: jode at Writing.Com). All rights reserved.
JoDe has granted Writing.Com, its affiliates and syndicates non-exclusive rights to display this work.
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