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by Dragyn
Rated: 18+ · Book · Arts · #2172182
Art and Multimedia through the eyes of a Dragon
#945995 added November 21, 2018 at 9:32pm
Restrictions: None
Learning Chinese Storyboard
Video Game Storyboard for 104E


Create a storyboard (6 frames minimum) for a video game to teach a topic that you struggled with in K-12 schooling using the principles discussed by Gee. You may create one with your group, or create your own. Your storyboard may be on paper or digital.
Upload a photo to your blog along with a 250 word (or more) discussion on how the video game you designed addresses the principles (Empowering learners, Problem-based learning, Creating deep learning)


Once more, I know the image size here isn't optimal, so I also saved a bigger version   for easier viewing on Google Photos.

Regardless, Chinese wasn't exactly a topic I struggled with in K-12 schooling, but thinking back, I never really had a tough struggle with school... and since I'm teaching Chinese School now, I thought it appropriate if I do a storyboard for a game to learn Chinese, especially since I've had something like this brewing in my head for a while now.


Ideally, this would be a role-playing, action-adventure type of game. The player moves the mouse and that can help move the avatar (Manipulation). These six frames are the beginning of the game- after you choose and/or customize what you want to look like (Identity)- I ended up using a girl with a yellow dress and red hair for mine! The premise of the game is, you've moved into a new neighborhood and most people there speak Chinese. The first family you meet has a child about your age, and also of the same gender. That's where the storyboard begins. The "Wǒ jiào" option will lead to a screen where you get to choose your name.

As you progress through the game and meet new people, there will be more dialogue choices to choose from (Cycle of Expertise). Meeting new people will bring you back to screens like "Nǐ jiào shénme míngzì?" which will help reinforce interpersonal concepts like "What is your name?" and "My name is ___" (Skills under strategies). Correct answers will earn players XP that can level them up- new levels can unlock new places to explore within the game, in addition to harder questions and simulations. Some questions may have more than one correct answer, so depending on how the player answers, they can get bonus points to level up faster.
         For example, "Nín" is used as a more "respectful" type of "you"- while it's not always necessary to use it, many times, it is preferred when interacting with someone older and/or in a higher position of power. Therefore, if the player chooses "Nín" instead of "Ní" they could get an extra point to level up faster (well-ordered sequencing).

As seen in the storyboard, with every correct and/or incorrect answer, there is an explanation as to why the choice is the right/wrong one (information). There will also be directions or a narration at the top of the screen, which gives context as to what is going on in the game. The choices will lead to reactions from the other characters (Meaning as action)- like a confused face when you say "goodbye" upon just meeting someone.

Ultimately, this game is targeted towards a younger audience. It should help give the players a deeper understanding of the Chinese language and for pinyin.

© Copyright 2018 Dragyn (UN: flamebreather at Writing.Com). All rights reserved.
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Printed from https://www.writing.com/main/books/action/view/entry_id/945995