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Printed from https://www.writing.com/main/books/action/view/entry_id/959748
Rated: 13+ · Book · Food/Cooking · #2190227
My Recipe Book, constantly being added to
#959748 added November 11, 2020 at 9:20pm
Restrictions: None
Roasted Fresh Corn on the Cob
I have no hostility to nature, but a child's love to it. I expand and live in the warm day like corn and melons.
         — Ralph Waldo Emerson

Scientists believe people living in central Mexico developed corn at least 7000 years ago. It was started from a wild grass called teosinte. It looked very different from our corn today. The kernels were small and were not placed close together like kernels on the husked ear of modern corn. Also known as maize Indians throughout North and South America, eventually depended upon this crop for much of their food.

From Mexico maize spread north into the Southwestern United States and south down the coast to Peru. About 1000 years ago, as Indian people migrated north to the eastern woodlands of present day North America, they brought corn with them.

When Europeans like Columbus made contact with people living in North and South America, corn was a major part of the diet of most native people. When Columbus "discovered" America, he also discovered corn. But up to this time, people living in Europe did not know about corn.

The first Thanksgiving was held in 1621. While sweet potatoes, cranberry sauce and pumpkin pie were not on the menu, Indian corn certainly would have been.

EQUIPMENT

Outdoor grille
Small piece of burlap
water spray bottle

INGREDIENTS

1/2 dozen ears of corn, partially husked

DIRECTIONS

Remove only outer layers of corn husk, leaving inner layers. Cut top of silk off. Soak in salt water for 20 minutes. Place ears on the grille under piece of burlap that has been watered down. Turn frequently and spray burlap with water bottle to keep it moist. Cooking time over a hot fire is approx. 30 minutes.

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