*Magnify*
<<     January     ►
SMTWTFS
   
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
Archive RSS
SPONSORED LINKS
Creative fun in
the palm of your hand.
Printed from https://www.Writing.Com/view/890221
Rated: 13+ · Book · Writing · #890221
A library featuring commonly committed errors of the English language.
#367751 added February 15, 2007 at 12:56pm
Restrictions: None
Loose vs. Lose
Loose is most commonly used as an adjective. In a general sense, it means free, unrestrained, or relaxed. Lose, on the other hand, is exclusively a verb. If you lose something, then that means it’s no longer in your control, or it means that you have suffered defeat (so, in a sense, you are no longer in control of the game or battle). However, loose can be a verb as well, essentially referring to the act of making something loose – the adjective, that is.

Examples:

*Bullet* Daunte Culpepper just fumbled. It’s a loose football.
*Bullet* You’d lose your head if it wasn’t attached to your body.
*Bullet* A dangerous criminal is loose! He escaped from the penitentiary last night!
*Bullet* The Packers just recovered Culpepper’s fumble. Now the Vikings will lose the game for sure.
*Bullet* I like loose-fitting pants. They’re much more comfortable.
© Copyright 2007 Davy Kraken (UN: kraken at Writing.Com). All rights reserved.
Davy Kraken has granted Writing.Com, its affiliates and its syndicates non-exclusive rights to display this work.
Log in to Leave Feedback
Username:
Password:
Not a Member?
Signup right now, for free!
All accounts include:
*Bullet* FREE Email @Writing.Com!
*Bullet* FREE Portfolio Services!
Printed from https://www.Writing.Com/view/890221