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Rated: 13+ · Book · Inspirational · #1986033
I’d rather write than talk. Stationery sections are more of a magnet than yarn.
Do you have a blog on this site or elsewhere? Have you thought about blogging and done research about it, only to become discouraged and abandon the whole idea? I almost didn’t start this blog.

In researching blogs, all the articles Google provided at first insisted that a blog needed to have a specific focus and to be updated regularly. I don’t know enough about any one area to support more than 10 posts. Fortunately one article mentioned “hobby” blogs that needed no focus, no paid hosting service, no search-engine optimization, and no affiliate marketing. I had no idea what the las two were and once I looked into them, I had no interest in either.

Have you started a topic-focused blog in the past, only to abandon it after pubishing a few posts? I have several abandoned blogs out there and maybe some of my posts here may find a home in either the weight loss one or the one about Carmelilte spirituality.

Apparently all niche-bloggers start out as hobby bloggers. I don’t plan to have a limited topic focus but I do hope to write posts that give something to you that makes reading them at least worth skimming through. I don’t want to blog “about” me; I want to share my interests, discoveries and maybe a few useful insights.
August 20, 2019 at 11:03pm
August 20, 2019 at 11:03pm
#964499
How often have you heard or read: “It may be true for you but it’s not true for me”? This mantra of Relativism states that there is no objective universal truth. This is a self-contradictory statement, (a topic for another post).
Few if any relativists are truly consistent in how they apply their beliefs. To do so, a relativist would have to apply this nontruth in every sphere of life. There would be no universal standards and everything would be permissible. Therefore we wouldn’t need the following professions, practices or institutions.
1 - Police: Anyone would have the right to do whatever they want to do to anyone else.
2 - School exams: Any answer the student provided is just as correct or valid as the teacher’s opinion about what the answer ought to be.
3 - Inspectors in any field: The car owner’s opinion is as valid as anyone else’s about whether his or her vehicle is safe to drive or fit to be sold.
4 - Historians: Beyond a few generations back, I could claim the Holocaust never happened and say to you who disagreed with me: “Don’t impose your history on me!”
5 - Lawyers: There would be no prohibition on, or penalty for, lying and cheating.
6 - Nutritionists: No one’s opinion would trump another’s about whether or not drinking milk will help your bones. Especially in this industry, what was true yesterday is false today and may be true again tomorrow.
7 - Prisons: A rapist could validly claim: “Rape may not be right for you but it’s right for me.”
8 - Unions: Employers could treat their employees as they see fit because there would be no labour standards.
9 - Insurance: There would be no point to buying insurance because the company could use any reason it considered valid not to honour your claim.
10 - Editors: The author’s use of grammar and his or her perception of the facts would be the only necessary criteria for publication.
In preparing to write this, I came across this saying: “Get the facts or the facts will get you. Beliefs have consequences.
What examples can you think of, apart from religion, where ideas have consequences?

Monique from Ottawa, Canada
No matter what, WRITE!
August 16, 2019 at 5:03pm
August 16, 2019 at 5:03pm
#964300
It could be the height of hubris to think this article would benefit ten out of 100 readers but let’s pretend it will. If I were to make twenty tiny tweaks in an attempt to “perfect” it, maybe it would help one or two more people. That would be great but what if I didn’t post it at all because I couldn’t make it as good as I thought it needed to be? How many people would benefit?
I struggle less with perfectionism than I used to, partly because I recognized how it was paralyzing my creativity and productivity. I realized that I could not please everyone, least of all myself. There is a thin grey area between perfectionism and excellence and a thicker grey area between excellence and “good enough”. There is nothing that I do that needs to be perfect in the way that a flight checklist or surgery needs to be. Now that I am retired, there are far fewer tasks where even excellence is really required. That may change depending on what projects or activities I take on.
How does one define what constitutes “perfection” for any project or task? Who gets to set out these criteria when perfection is an illusion to begin with? To what extent is perfectionism an excuse to procrastinate working on a project or avoiding it altogether?
In his video “Perfection is the enemy of done”, Adam Stein makes three important points
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IbE0Jkhkg1s
*Bullet*Work to completion, not perfection
*Bullet*Develop the habit of being a “finisher”
*Bullet*The “perfect project” never completed is no better than the project never started

Miranda Marquit describes the problems of perfectionism and provides practical tips for reducing our tendencies towards it.
https://due.com/blog/stop-worrying-perfection-get-things-done/

I have decided that when it comes to blogging, I will prefer posting to perfection. I will put more effort into my other writing for the contests on this site than I will for this blog. I will strive for excellence in my writing for contests and work to completion in creating content for this blog, letting “good enough” be enough.

Monique from Ottawa, Canada
No matter what, WRITE!
August 14, 2019 at 1:33am
August 14, 2019 at 1:33am
#964176
Do you ever wonder if there’s any point to saying or writing anything when there are so many voices competing for attention and most people’s attention span is woefully small? When Melissa Bowers mentioned a bad case of writer’s block in her post “Is There Room for Triviality in a World Like This?”, I had a feeling it wasn’t the usual case of having no ideas about what to write. She had plenty of ideas; she just didn’t think they were important enough to write about or to be read.

Is There Room for Triviality in a World Like This? By Melissa Bowers
https://melissabowers.com/room-for-triviality-in-world-like-this/

Even though I don’t watch news, I catch enough to know how overwhelming it is to absorb all the horror, despair and negativity. To talk or write about anything that is bothering me seems like having a petty pity party. Even if I were to say or write something positive, our souls are so crammed with information, it’s rational to assume that no one else has mental room to attend to anything you write. Not to mention that most of us are seriously sleep-deprived which decreases our mental as well as our physical abilities.

Some people have no trouble believing that others would be interested in what they have to say. Others, like me, are more likely to wonder who would bother paying attention to anything I have to say. Which category do you fall into?

Monique from Ottawa, Canada
No matter what, WRITE!
August 9, 2019 at 5:27pm
August 9, 2019 at 5:27pm
#963982
From The Golden Rules of Blogging (& When to Break Them) by Robin Houghton (Copyright 2015)
For each of the 28 “rules”, he lists, he also provides:
- Where the rule comes from
- When you should break it
- At least one brief and very perceptive expert comment
- A “Blogger’s Story” which includes a link to his/her blog

This is available on Amazon as a print book. I borrowed it from my local library. I’m way too new at blogging to be into affiliate marketing so I get no benefit to providing this link beyond the pleasure of maybe helping you.
https://www.amazon.ca/Golden-Rules-Blogging-Robin-Houghton/dp/1440339570/ref=sr_...

I especially liked how there were two views provided for each rule. It helped me to sort out what I want and don’t want to have in my blogging experience. I am not interested in gaining millions of readers or thousands of dollars. I don’t want to feel like a failure as a blogger because I don’t post every day and don’t bother with images.

Success is relative. What a successful blog is to others will be different than what it means to me. What constitutes a successful blog to me is going to be very different several years from now than it is today. My favourite quote from the book was: “Write out of a desire to record and share experiences and ideas.” If I am doing that at least weekly, then my blog is successful.

If you have a blog, you plan to start one soon or you are playing around with the idea, what does or would “success” for your blog mean for you?

Monique from Ottawa, Canada
No matter what, WRITE!
August 6, 2019 at 4:23pm
August 6, 2019 at 4:23pm
#963817
Before you started blogging, did you wonder whether it was worth the effort? Did you Google “blogging” only to find advice for promoting your brand and marketing your product? Maybe you got lucky and found an article that mentioned “hobby blogging” or “personal blogging”. Did this give you hope you could have a blog which did NOT have to be a narrowly focused, money-making, all-consuming venture.

The best reason for bloggin is that it gives you a reason to write every day. Not that you would post every day, but I want to have a backlog of posts ready to go when life gets in the way or I run out of ideas.

Here is a list of benefits of blogging that I came up with from reading the articles below along with several others.
*Bullet* It gives you a platform to share your ideas and discoveries.
*Bullet* You can share what interests you.
*Bullet* It gives you a place to showcase your writing
*Bullet* You can connect with people who share your interests.
*Bullet* Writing regularly improves your writing
*Bullet* You’ll learn new things from research you’ll need to Which of these most encourages you to start a blog if you haven’t already done so or to expand on one that you may have abandoned?

In this article, Joshua Becker shares 15 ways blogging can impact your life. I especially like the quote and image at the beginning of his post.
15 Reasons I think you should blog
https://www.becomingminimalist.com/15-reasons-i-think-you-should-blog/

This transcript from an episode of the ProBlogger podcast answers a listener’s question about whether it is important to have a personal blog. This list of reasons could lean toward a niche blog in your future. If you’re interested in delving more deeply into the blogging process, it may be worth subscribing to the podcast.
15 Reasons why you should consider having a personal blog
https://problogger.com/podcast/15-reasons-why-you-should-consider-having-a-perso...

Monique from Ottawa, Canada
No matter what, WRITE!

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