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Printed from https://www.writing.com/main/view_item/item_id/1752597-Dont-Go-In-The-Water
Rated: 13+ · Novel · Thriller/Suspense · #1752597
Part 1 of 3 to a story about an ancient underwater killer coming back and killing people.

Deep within the ocean blue, an earthquake shakes the ground. Lost for one-hundred-forty million years, a killer rises. It is death-black in color, and a massive length of three school buses, and a head the size of a car, it is the most fearsome and deadly predator ever to live on the planet.
Liopleurodon waited in silence for its prey to swim toward it. It sensed its prey, like the shark it was hunting.
The shark was a great white, well over thirty feet, and was oblivious to the dark shape rising beneath it.
This great white felt a great pain in the stomach, and then was swallowed whole by the colossal creature that was Liopleurodon. The head was severed at the gills, and the tail was severed and sank to the bottom of the sea. Being relatively close to shore, the head washed up onto land. It was found in Argentina by a boy no older than three, and he got the shock of his life when he saw the head of the great white.
“MOMMY!” he yelled, and then ran back to his house, about four feet away. His mother looked and called the authorities.
Although the police didn’t know what the heck could have done this to a great white (besides an orca; they have never seen one around here) they closed down the beaches for further investigation. They sent out a submarine pilot to check out the cove.
The pilot’s name was Harold Booty. He had lived around here for thirty years, and was trained for the military, and then he gathered a fascination for submarines.
He wanted to see what the heck would have done this crazy thing to a shark, especially a shark this big, and got in his submarine and went into deep water.
Harold looked around carefully, expecting something unusual, but never found anything. He saw fish about ten feet long, smaller fish, smaller fish, even smaller fish, and supposed there must be plankton around because he recognized several fish that fed on plankton.
Then he saw it.
At first it looked like a whale, it was definitely over seventy feet; then he thought it was a giant shark. But the answer was none of the above; it was Liopluerodon.
It swam past Harold gently, and then with a single swipe of its head, it broke open the glass of the submarine.
Harold held his breath, unable to cry for help or scream. The jaws searched for him, and he ran the submarine away.
He headed straight for the surface and got a breath of air, and then he lost the submarine beneath him, and he was about a mile from shore.
He started to swim, and the Liopleurodon followed, wanting a light snack. Harold looked behind him, and the back of the Liopleurodon breached the surface. It was one-hundred feet behind him, and he was now half of a mile from shore.
He felt a slight tug, and his foot was gone. He screamed, “HELP! IT’S A MONSTER!” And then he was dragged under.
He realized the water had turned red, and to his horror it was his own blood. He looked down, and saw the monstrosity reach higher on his body, and then he needed to breathe again.
He looked up, and it was hopeless.
The last thing Harold Booty saw in his life was the sun shining on the surface, and him being pulled down even further, all the time being chewed on by a Liopleurodon, and with a gentle crunch of his back, his life gently oozed away.

The police found the remains of Harold Booty (if you could call them remains; it was just a boot with the severed foot still in it) they officially declared the beach permanently closed, even though the monster had moved on. It was going to a new feeding grounds, were it could establish itself ruler, just as it would have done a very long time ago. It was the bull, and the horns were coming. Its ‘horns’ were its teeth, almost a foot long, and put in a car-sized mouth, this definitely meant trouble to anyone unfortunate enough to be in the water.
The death of Harold Booty and the great white head found on the beach by the little boy made national news. “A monster!” some had said. “A killer!” others said. But a Nevada-born paleontologist who lived in Chile said, “Look at the teeth marks! It can be nothing other than Liopleurodon!” The American ‘s name was Roger Clements, and he was smart.
The Liopleurodon marched its way up to Mexico, where there just happened to be a beach.
Its instincts powered up for hunger, and its nose sensed prey. It was a dead-on sign that said, EAT NOW.
Its speed picked up, and it focused its attention on a fat man, about forty years old. It grabbed him by the legs. But before he could eat him, he saw more food around.
The fat man got the ride of his life. He was pulled and went somewhere around thirty miles per hour. A teenager saw the fat man coming towards him and said, “Don’t hit me you-“
The Liopleurodon grabbed him, and red blood trailed after the creature. The teen was dead within five seconds.
The fat man still was not dead, and he was hanging on by his feet, locked onto the mouth of the Liopleurodon. He saw another man, a woman and a raft make its way into the mouth, and he was soon coated in blood.
The attacker soon lost interest, and the fat man let go. He started to swim back to shore, and he made a vow never to go into the water again.
The news for Mexico was that three people had been killed by an unseen object, making the total of victims in the world up to four. Roger Clements said again, “That’s a Liopleurodon!” but again no one listened.

The greatest carnivore that ever lived on the planet now made its way to California. It realized that wherever there was food, there might be more predators.
So when it reached the shores of San Diego, it was very wary. It didn’t know he was the last Liopleurodon ever to live, so he was oblivious to the fact the only predators here were great whites and other sharks.
So the people of San Diego didn’t know that a super-predator was on the loose.
A tourist by the name of Don Simmers had never been in water in his whole life, as he lived in a desert in Arizona, so he gently approached the water.
He went out a little further, and the Liopleurodon swallowed him and a woman next to him in one gigantic gulp.
The lifeguard saw this and ordered everyone out of the water. A man by the name of Jack, whose last name is unknown, caught a picture of the Liopleurodon coming straight for him.
He dropped the camera into the water, and held his breath, and jumped beneath it, but didn’t dodge it; his body was crushed by the immense weight of the creature.
And who should find the picture later on by none other than Roger Clements.

Part 2 coming soon..
© Copyright 2011 Randall Evans (nonames at Writing.Com). All rights reserved.
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Printed from https://www.writing.com/main/view_item/item_id/1752597-Dont-Go-In-The-Water