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Rated: 13+ · Review · Cultural · #2043575
"Fury" is a 1936 film starring Spencer Tracey, an AMC "Essential."
Beachcatuesday is a lover of film noir. The AMC channel offered a viewing of this film during a promotion called the "Essentials. This is a 1936 film in black and white worth the watching. You should be able to access this film from on demand or an online source. Directed by Fritz Lang, a German film maker before the war--he came to the US and this was his first American cinema release, and edgy subject matter for the times.


You Tube trailer of "Fury"



Joe Wilson and Katherine Grant are two young people in love, unable to marry due to economic circumstances. The film opens with the two saying goodbye at the Chicago train station, trading mementos of their love and dedication--that's mementos, not momentos

Katherine (Sylvia Sidney) works at her job as a teacher in Washington, and receives regular letters from Joe which share good news. Joe gets an opportunity to buy into a filling station. After a year, Katherine receives a telegram that he's on the way to her, marriage license in hand. They plan to meet at 11:00 at a hot dog stand near her home.

He leaves the gas station in his brothers' care, and takes off in his convertible with his little dog "Rainbow". He camps out with his dog the second evening of travel, and problems erupt, as Katherine arrives at the combo filling station and soda jerk stand of the era. Drug stores don't have soda fountains in them anymore--but they were the place to hang out and be cool.


Incomplete draft



The story bends from romance to suspense.







"Looks bad, Rainbow," Joe tells his little dog as flames beat toward his jail cel
ll. The building engulfed in flames, Joe upstairs with no visible exit. "Rainbow," the little dog who accompanied all this time dies in the mob instigated fire. And Joe dies. Joe had to die in such a conflagration...didn't he?
Twenty-twp members of the mob are brought to trial. The prosecutor says, "In the past 49 years, 6,010 incidence of mob rule lead to lynching, burning, or cutting to death. Only 765 cases were everry brought to trial.

From my Twenty-first Century purch, I though lynchings were associated with the Old West. I was in error, and remind you this was filmed in 1936. Praise the Lord in Heaven that times have changed.

Revenge, justice, confessions of guilt, wry attitudes revolve and develop.

An old black and white movie that's essential to understanding how we got where we are.

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Printed from https://www.Writing.Com/view/2043575