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Printed from https://www.Writing.Com/view/2214388
Rated: E · Poetry · Children's · #2214388
A mother telling the story of Bakunawa to her son, an entry for a contest.
"Here ye, here ye,
my son so lively,
let us put you to bed,
your mother is sleepy."

"Mommy, mommy!"
The boy was chirpy,
"I want another bedtime story!"

The mother looked happy,
as she thought of a story,
"Alright, my dear,"
the boy was merry,
"I'll tell a tale
that you'll fancy,"



"There once was a serpent,
who lived in the sea,
whatever monster he was,
the dragon looked scary.

No one dared to look his eyes,
no sultan would send his guys,
no guns, no sticks, nor spies,
when their men would just die.

Then came a mademoiselle,
A virgin, graceful damsel,
with eyes so sweet with honey lips
and gorgeous cheeks and plumpous hips.

A daughter of a sultan,
this girl was a bride,
to the hand of a man,
with courageous pride.

The girl met the dragon,
and the dragon fell in love.
Wanting to offer a ring,
to the sea, he dove.

Alas! There was no ring,
but the moon, the girl sings,
so then Bakunawa rose up,
to offer the girl something.

The dragon flew towards the sky,
up and about the moon so high,
then Bathala, God of Sky and Wind,
saw the moon get beat and dinged.

He cursed the dragon of Gluttony,
for he was a serpent snake so greedy.

Then the girl was sad and sorry,
for the dragon she loved with amity,
was cursed with a curse from hostility.

The girl knew not to be affected,
but she let the grass beneath,
get sunken and wet with grief,
from tears falling down her cheek.

The girl saw how much the dragon,
had a heart so yellow and golden.

The dragon was nowhere to be found
but rumors say he's still around
as the moon up in the sky gets dark
from an eclipse of the lunar mark.

Until this day, the tale is sung
from how eclipses had once begun."




And with that, the mother saw,
her son, a curled up sleeping ball.
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Printed from https://www.Writing.Com/view/2214388